The Lon-1 Protease Is Required by Borrelia burgdorferi To Infect the Mammalian Host Molecular Pathogenesis

Borrelia burgdorferi encodes a functional homolog of canonical Lon protease termed Lon-2. In addition, B. burgdorferi encodes a second Lon homolog called Lon-1. Recent studies suggest that Lon-1 may function differently from the prototypical Lon protease. However, the function of Lon-1 in B. burgdorferi biology remains virtually unknown. Particularly, the contribution of Lon-1 to B. burgdorferi fitness and infection remains hitherto unexplored. Herein, we show that Lon-1 plays a critical role for the infection of B. burgdorferi in a mammalian host. We found that lon-1 was highly expressed during animal infection, implying an important function of this protein in bacterial infection. We further generated a lon-1 deletion mutant and an isogenic complemented strain. Relative to that of the wild-type strain, the infectivity of the mutant was severely attenuated in a murine infection model. Our data also showed that the mutant displayed growth defects in regular BSK-II medium. Furthermore, bacterial resistance to osmotic stress was markedly reduced when lon-1 was inactivated. When exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, survival of the lon-1 mutant was impaired. In addition, production of several virulence factors, such as BosR, RpoS, and OspC, was elevated in the mutant. These phenotypes were restored when the lon-1 mutation was complemented. Finally, we created a lon-1(S714A) mutant and found that this mutant failed to infect mice, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of Lon-1 ...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Molecular Pathogenesis Source Type: research

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Borrelia bavariensis is one of the agents of Lyme Borreliosis (or Lyme disease) in Eurasia. The genome of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species complex, that includes B. bavariensis, is known to be very com...
Source: BMC Genomics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
(Virginia Tech) Renowned tick immunobiologist Utpal Pal wants to adapt the rabies vaccination platform to produce antibodies that can protect against Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. The intention is to apply this work to other tick-borne diseases in the future.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
The objective of the study was to determine the infection prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme disease, in the province's ticks and the seroprevalence in its dogs. It was found that 97.8% (n = 368) of ticks submitted were Ixodes scapularis, a species capable of transmitting Borrelia burgdorferi; 10.3% of these ticks [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.6% to 17.0%] were infected. Provincial canine seroprevalence for the 199 submitted samples was estimated at 3.0% (95% CI: 1.0% to 5.1%). PMID: 33012828 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Canadian Veterinary Journal - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Can Vet J Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Lyme disease is rare, but must be kept in mind when investigating the etiology of chorioretinitis and retinal vasculitis. The patient reported here is, to our knowledge, the second case reported in literature that shows atypical clinic for Lyme disease with unilateral chorioretinitis without Erythema chronicum migrans (ECM). PMID: 32998513 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Eur J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Ahead of Print.
Source: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The bacterial genus, Borrelia, is comprised of vector-borne spirochete species that infect and are transmitted from multiple host species. Some Borrelia species cause highly-prevalent diseases in humans and domestic animals. Evolutionary, ecological, and molecular research on many Borrelia species have resulted in tremendous progress toward understanding the biology and natural history of these species. Yet, many outstanding questions, such as how Borrelia populations will be impacted by climate and land-use change, will require an interdisciplinary approach. The evolutionary ecology research framework in...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Infection with tick borne Borrelia Burgdorferi (Lyme disease) can without treatment rarely develop into a chronic phase. Secondary Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (sNPH) based on chronic infection with Borrelia ...
Source: BMC Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case report Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Cats can be infected with both Bbsl and Lisl. The obtained results are exclusive to the city of Brno and its environs, and are comparable to the limited previous studies. There is a need for further studies of clinical signs of both infections and the possible transmission of Leptospira by ticks. PMID: 32955214 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine : AAEM - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Ann Agric Environ Med Source Type: research
Abstract Companion animals can become infected with tick-borne diseases (TBDs) and can become hosts of transmission to humans, thereby damaging human health. To clarify whether companion animals are infested by ticks harboring TBD pathogens in humans, we detected TBD pathogens in ticks collected from dogs and cats brought to animal hospitals in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. Investigation of 164 adult ticks collected from 88 dogs and 41 cats during March-July 2018 revealed the predominant tick species as Ixodes ovatus (n = 95, 57.9%), followed by Ixodes nipponensis (37, 22.6%) and Haemaphysalis flava (10, 6.1%). The ...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
Date: Friday, 08 21, 2020; Speaker: Travis Bourret, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Microbiology&Immunology, Creighton University School of Medicine; Building: Online - Webex, twitter, Facebook Live; URL:
Source: NIH Calendar of Events - Category: American Health Source Type: events
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