Preferences of livestock owners for sharing the cost of brucellosis control in Tajikistan

Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: Research in Veterinary ScienceAuthor(s): Vinod Ahuja, David Ward, Rukhshona Rajabov, Anni McLeod, Ron JacksonAbstractIn the context of significant public health benefits of brucellosis control and shrinking public resources for livestock vaccination, this paper considers the willingness of small ruminant livestock owners to pay for vaccination of their animals against brucellosis. The willingness to pay is estimated through a binary choice contingent valuation approach using data from a rural household survey specially designed for this purpose. The survey was conducted in southern Tajikistan, one of its poorest regions, in March 2009. The study used a non-parametric method for estimating the willingness to pay and a parametric (Probit) model for identifying determinants. The results show that households, including poor households, were willing to pay for continuing vaccination of their sheep and goats against brucellosis. Controlling for other attributes of willingness to pay, there was practically no correlation between willingness to pay and household asset level. This means both poor and rich alike are willing to pay for the service. On the other hand, the results also show that the willingness to pay was comparatively higher in households with relatively higher levels of education of adult females. This suggests that an awareness campaign targeted at female members of households would enhance the ownership and co...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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Conclusions: The study concluded in bringing out the contributing risk factors for brucellosis. The study concluded that treating animal infection on their own and helping animals during reproduction without using protective gear, as major contributing risk for brucellosis. Other factors includes, keeping animals in close proximity during sleep, irregular vaccination, etc.
Source: Indian Journal of Community Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, the gene encoding OMP19 antigen was primarily amplified and cloned into an expression vector called pT1NX, and then transformed to L. casei cell via electroporation technique. The expression was confirmed using specific antibody against the recombinant protein via immunological screening tests such as western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Finally, recombinant L. casei was orally fed to mice and the results were further recorded, indicating that the mice group which received OMP19 through L. casei based vaccine represented a very good general and mucosal immune responses protective against challenges wit...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
ary U, Wensman JJ Abstract An extended range of host susceptibility including camel has been evidenced for some of the important veterinary and public health pathogens, such as brucellosis, peste des petits ruminants (PPR) and bluetongue (BT). However, in disease endemic settings across many parts of the globe, most of the disease control interventions accounts for small and large ruminants, whereas unusual hosts and/or natural reservoirs, such as camels, remain neglected for disease control measures including routine vaccination. Such a policy drawback not only plays an important role in disease epizootiology par...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: Journal of Microbiological MethodsAuthor(s): Triveni Kalleshamurthy, Somy Skariah, Yashaswini Rathore, Kavana D. Ramanjinappa, Chaitra Nagaraj, Bibek Ranjan Shome, Habibur Rahman, Nagendra Nath Barman, Rajeswari ShomeAbstractBrucellosis is an important zoonosis that constitutes a serious public health hazard which is caused by a bacterium belonging to the genus Brucella. In the present study, two highly specific serological tests for brucellosis diagnosis, fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and competitive ELISA (cELISA) were standardized in the laboratory, evalu...
Source: Journal of Microbiological Methods - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
AbstractMore than 70% of zoonotic diseases are wildlife associated putting wildlife professionals at increased risk of occupational exposure. In 2008 and 2018, the Arizona Department of Health Services surveyed Arizona wildlife professionals from multiple agencies to assess the risk of disease exposure, rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) history, personal protective equipment (PPE) use, and zoonoses knowledge. In 2008, a 12-question survey was distributed at a state wildlife professional meeting using an anonymous email link. In 2018, a 20-question survey was distributed using an anonymous email link to wildlife agency...
Source: EcoHealth - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
A, Verdugo-Rodríguez A Abstract For control of brucellosis in small ruminants, attenuated B. melitensis Rev1 is used but it can be virulent for animals and human. Based on these aspects, it is essential to identify potential immunogens to avoid these problems on prevention of brucellosis. The majority OMP of the Omp25/31 family have been studied because these proteins contribute in a relevant way to the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane but its implication in the virulence of the different species of this genus is not clearly described. Therefore the aim of this work was to study the role o...
Source: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 December 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Bisvanath Patra, Manjit Panigrahi, Sheikh Firdous Ahmad, Satyabrata Dandapat, Pushpendra Kumar, Bharat BhushanAbstractIn the present study, we analyzed the immune response of calves to Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine (S19) and its association with MHC class I (BoLA-A) alleles (exons 2-3 and 4-5). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for typing of MHC class I BoLA-A exon 2-3 with DdeI and TaqI restriction enzymes and exon 4-5 with HinfI in 45 crossbred calves. The PCR-RFLP analysi...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Authors: Bosilkovski M, Arapović J, Keramat F Abstract Human brucellosis during pregnancy is characterized by significantly less pronounced adverse obstetric outcomes than in animals, but with remarkably more adverse obstetric outcomes when compared to healthy pregnant women. Seroprevalence of brucellosis in pregnancy and cumulative incidence of brucellosis cases per 1000 delivered obstetrical discharges in endemic regions were reported to be 1.5-12.2% and 0.42-3.3, respectively. Depending on the region, frequency of pregnant women in the cohorts of patients with brucellosis was from 1.5% to 16.9%. The most common...
Source: Bosnian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Tags: Bosn J Basic Med Sci Source Type: research
We studied the effect of the organoselenium compound 2,6-dipyridinium-9-selenium-bicyclo[ 3,3,1]nonan dibromide (974zh) on the severity of pathological changes in the organs of experimental animals immunized with live tularemia and brucellosis vaccines. It was found that 974zh reduced reactogenicity of vaccines for experimental animals. Our findings indicate the prospects for further studies of the effects of 974zh on the functional state of experimental animals.
Source: Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Source Type: research
AbstractSheep brucellosis is a worldwide extended disease caused byB. melitensis andB. ovis, two species respectively carrying smooth or rough lipopolysaccharide. VaccineB. melitensis Rev1 is used againstB. melitensis andB. ovis but induces an anti-smooth-lipopolysaccharide response interfering withB. melitensis serodiagnosis, which precludes its use againstB. ovis whereB. melitensis is absent. In mice, Rev1 deleted inwbkC (Brucella lipopolysaccharide formyl-transferase) and carryingwbdR (E. coli acetyl-transferase) triggered antibodies that could be differentiated from those evoked by wild-type strains, was comparatively ...
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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