Fake news makes disease outbreaks worse, research shows

(University of East Anglia) The rise of fake news could be making disease outbreaks worse -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Researchers focused on influenza, monkeypox and norovirus across two studies -- but they say their findings could also be useful for dealing with the COVID-19 Coronavirus outbreak.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he has been discharged from a New Jersey hospital after a week there following his announcement that he had contracted the coronavirus
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
CORONAVIRUS could infect you within a moment's notice, but the body takes longer to respond. Top researchers from King's College London have discovered the 'dark horses' of COVID-19.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Journal of Hospital InfectionAuthor(s): Hisakazu Yano, Ryuichi Nakano, Yuki Suzuki, Akiyo Nakano, Kei Kasahara, Hiroshi Hosoi
Source: Journal of Hospital Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said he was released from the hospital Saturday morning following treatment for the coronavirus.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The warning comes amid plans to bring in a three-tier local lockdown system to slow the spread of Covid.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By ANISH MEHTA, MD My practice received its first question about coronavirus from a patient on January 28, 2020. Though there were over 200 deaths reported in China by that time, no one could have imagined how drastically this would come to disrupt our lives at home. Thankfully, I had a head start. As a doctor at an integrated telemedicine and primary care practice in New York City, nearly two out of every three of my medical encounters that month was already virtual. I spent much of January caring for patients who had contracted seasonal viruses, like influenza or norovirus (i.e. the stomach flu). My patients ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
(BOISE, Idaho) — They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online. Other proposals include limiting fire engines to a driver and one passenger, requiring other crew members to ride i...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration is giving the maker of Purell products a stern warning: Stop making unproven claims that over-the-counter hand sanitizers help eliminate Ebola, MRSA or the flu. In a “warning letter” to Purell’s parent, Gojo Industries, the agency called out the company for making numerous marketing claims that potentially position its sanitizing products as a pharmaceutical drug rather than an over-the-counter topical antiseptic. The letter from the agency’s director of compliance cited numerous examples of what the FDA says are unproven claims for Purell products m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Hand Sanitizer Source Type: news
In this study, we proposed a comparative analysis approach and built a model to simulate outbreaks of 3 different in‐flight infections in a similar cabin environment, that is, influenza A H1N1, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV), and norovirus. The simulation results seemed to suggest that the close contact route was probably the most significant route (contributes 70%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 67%‐72%) in the in‐flight transmission of influenza A H1N1 transmission; as a result, passengers within 2 rows of the index case had a significantly higher infection risk than others in the outbrea...
Source: Indoor Air - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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Source: Indoor Air - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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