Is Premarin, alone, the key to successful menopausal hormone therapy?

(Bentham Science Publishers) The presented study reveals that synthetic hormone prescription in medical practice may be responsible for the misconception that ERs exposed to elevated endogenous estrogen concentrations may be deregulated and drive cancer promoting changes.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

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Researchers say fear using hormone for hot flashes, mental fogginess and libido problems was a misreading of a landmark 2002 study
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers say fear of hormones for hot flashes, mental fogginess and libido problems was a misreading of a landmark 2002 study
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
AbstractPurposeDisentangling the effects of endogenous estrogens and inflammation on obesity-related diseases requires a clearer understanding of how the two biological mechanisms relate to each other.MethodsWe studied 155 healthy postmenopausal women not taking menopausal hormone therapy enrolled in the Prostate Lung Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) screening cancer trial. From a baseline blood draw, we measured endogenous estradiol and 69 inflammation biomarkers: cytokines, chemokines, adipokines, angiogenic factors, growth factors, acute phase proteins, and soluble receptors. We evaluated the estradiol –inflammation ...
Source: Cancer Causes and Control - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
PMID: 32067815 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Gynecologic Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
This study investigated how a history of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) impacts clinical outcomes overall and in different subgroups of breast cancer patients. The study included 814 primary breast cancer patients aged ≥50 years in Sweden (2002–2012) with follow-up until 2016. Associations between patient- and tumor characteristics, recurrences, and overall survival were analyzed in relation to MHT. After a median follow-up of 7 years, 119 recurrences, and 111 deaths occurred. Ever MHT (n = 433, 53.2%) was associated with a lower BMI, frequency of alcohol abstinence, and histological grade, higher frequency of o...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Although based on a small number of women, these findings suggest that oophorectomy does not increase psychological distress among women at an elevated risk of ovarian cancer.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Conclusions: The risks of hormone therapy should be assessed on an individual basis, with consideration of age, type of hormone therapy, dose, duration of use, regimen, route, and prior exposure. Systemic hormone therapy is not recommended in breast cancer survivors, whereas vaginal low-dose estrogen appears safe. Hormone therapy may be used by endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancer survivors with low-risk, non-estrogen-receptor–positive subtypes. Video Summary:http://links.lww.com/MENO/A516.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Hormone replacement therapy may slightly improve overall survival in women who have undergone surgical treatment for EOC, but the certainty of the evidence is low. HRT may make little or no difference to quality of life, incidence of breast cancer, TIA, CVA and MI as the certainty of the evidence has been assessed as very low. There may be little or no effect of HRT use on progression-free survival. The evidence in this review is limited by imprecision and incompleteness of reported relevant outcomes and therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. Future well-designed RCTs are required as this is...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
We report a unique case of a 60-year-old woman developing endometrial cancer in a uterine deposit 18 years after she had undergone laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy with morcellation for benign pathology. She had used unopposed estrogen as menopausal hormone therapy. She presented with a pelvic mass that was causing pressure symptoms. On imaging, the mass had an enhancing vascular nodular component and appeared to abut normal ovaries and the residual cervix. She proceeded to laparotomy, where a 12 cm pelvic mass was found morbidly adherent to the bladder anteriorly and to the cervical stump. The pelvic mass was excise...
Source: Case Reports in Womens Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
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