The Role of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with serious clinical sequelae, but despite its significance little is known about the genetic origins. Recently, the untranscribed 98% of the human genome has been increasingly implicated in important processes like cardiac organogenesis, physiology, and pathophysiology. Specifically, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have been shown to interact with the transcriptome in various ways that alter gene expression. Previously, multiple lncRNAs have been identified in disease processes such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and more.
Source: Heart Rhythm - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research

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Michel Mirowski and his colleagues gave the field of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) a pretty good start, but what's more impressive is how far the technology has advanced since that first human ICD implant in February 1980. In the past 40 years we've seen ICDs become dramatically smaller, longer lasting, more capable, more personalized, subcutaneous (non-transvenous), and even MRI-firendly. And that's not to mention the advanced data connectivity and monitoring capabilities that the latest technologies offer. So without further ado, let's take a look at the current ICD landscape and the companie...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Implants Source Type: news
Abstract Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in western society affecting more than 35 million individuals worldwide annually. It is a common postoperative complication and may also occur spontaneously during general and local anesthesia administration. Aging, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases including cardiomyopathies, congenital cardiac anomalies, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, pericarditis, previous cardiac surgery, vascular disease, and valvular heart disease are some correlated factors. Beyond age, increased incidence of atrial fibrillation has been corre...
Source: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Ann Card Anaesth Source Type: research
AbstractAimsConcerns about the prognostic value of NYHA functional class (FC) in heart failure (HF) patients carrying a prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are still present. We aimed to compare whether mortality and arrhythmic risk were different, in a cohort of HF patients undergoing ICD ‐only implant, according to their FC.Methods and resultsHF patients with left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35%, undergoing first prophylactic ICD‐only implant were collected from a multicentre nationwide registry (2006–2015). Six hundred and twenty‐one patients were identified (101 patients in ...
Source: ESC Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, T2D impairs vascular function by dysregulated autophagy. Therefore, autophagy could be a potential target for overcoming diabetic microvascular complications. To What Degree Does Loss of Skeletal Muscle with Age Contribute to Immunosenescence? https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/to-what-degree-does-loss-of-skeletal-muscle-with-age-contribute-to-immunosenescence/ Sarcopenia, the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, is characteristic of aging. A perhaps surprisingly large fraction of the losses can be averted by strength training, but there are nonetheless inexorable process...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
AbstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is common in patients with obesity and diabetes; the arrhythmia (if long ‐standing) is typically managed by rate‐control and anticoagulation. However, the coexistence of these two metabolic disorders complicates therapeutic options for rate‐control. The likely pathogenesis of AF in these patients is an expansion of epicardial adipose tissue, whose inflammation is t ransmitted to the left atrium causing electromechanical remodeling. However, this same process is also transmitted to the left ventricle, impairing its distensibility and its ability to tolerate volume, leading to heart fai...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS Source Type: research
Conclusions: Patients with ≥1 risk factor had a 30% higher risk for arrhythmia recurrence after ablation, but no differences in risk for repeat ablations, adverse events or death.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
Source: Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology : PACE - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Source Type: research
Authors: Golaszewska K, Harasim-Symbor E, Polak-Iwaniuk A, Chabowski A Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a commonly occurring arrhythmia which significantly reduces patients' quality of life and substantially shortens life expectancy. Although long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are the basic energy substrates for myocardial metabolism, their excess can result in lipotoxicity, which increases the risk of arrhythmia. Intracellularly, LCFAs are bound by fatty acid biding proteins (FABPs) and this results in low level of free LCFAs in the cytoplasm. Based on this principle, FABPs are considered "safeguards" ag...
Source: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: J Physiol Pharmacol Source Type: research
Rationale: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia disease that can cause thromboembolic disease and/or heart failure, resulting in increased mortality. Propafenone, amiodarone, and flecainide are recommended for converting AF to sinus rhythm. Beta blockers, verapamil, diltiazem, and digoxin are recommended for controlling AF with fast ventricular rate (VR). In this case report, we found that verapamil successfully converted AF into sinus rhythm. Patient concerns: A 92-year-old woman presented with fast VR AF with a history of coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Diagnoses: Verapamil can succ...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings limit the possible roles of gene transcriptional changes in previously reported age-dependent pro-arrhythmic electrophysiologial changes observed in Pgc-1β-/- atria to an altered Ca2+-ATPase (Atp2a2) expression. This directly parallels previously reported arrhythmic mechanism associated with p21-activated kinase type 1 deficiency. This could add to contributions from the direct physiological outcomes of mitochondrial dysfunction, whether through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Introduction Atrial arrhythmias constitute a major public health probl...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
More News: Arrhythmia | Atrial Fibrillation | Cardiology | Diabetes | Endocrinology | Genetics | Heart | Heart Failure | Physiology