Evidence that reduction in volume protects in situ articular chondrocytes from mechanical impact.

Evidence that reduction in volume protects in situ articular chondrocytes from mechanical impact. Connect Tissue Res. 2020 Jan 14;:1-15 Authors: Kotelsky A, Carrier JS, Aggouras A, Richards MS, Buckley MR Abstract Chondrocytes, the resident cells in articular cartilage, carry the burden of producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, as these cells have a low proliferative capacity and are not readily replaced, chondrocyte death due to extreme forces may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) after injury or may inhibit healing after osteochondral transplantation, a restorative procedure for damaged cartilage that requires a series of mechanical impacts to insert the graft. Consequently, there is a need to understand what factors influence the vulnerability of in situ chondrocytes to mechanical trauma. To this end, the objective of this study was to investigate how altering cell volume by different means (hydrostatic pressure, uniaxial load, and osmotic challenge with and without inhibition of regulatory volume decrease) affects the vulnerability of in situ chondrocytes to extreme mechanical forces. Using a custom experimental platform enabling testing of viable and intact murine cartilage-on-bone explants, we established a strong correlation between chondrocyte volume and vulnerability to impact injury wherein reduced volume was protective. Moreover, we found that the volume-perturbing interventions did not affect car...
Source: Connective Tissue Research - Category: Research Tags: Connect Tissue Res Source Type: research

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs
Authors: Spang RC, Getgood A, Strickland SM, Amendola AN, Gomoll AH Abstract This review focuses on the management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients when other concomitant pathology may need to be addressed at the time of surgery. Given the role of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus in preventing osteoarthritis progression and contributing to knee stability, medial meniscus repair should always be considered when performing ACL reconstruction. Meniscal transplant may also be appropriate in select patients with normal knee alignment and absent of cartilage abnormalities in the compar...
Source: Instructional Course Lectures - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Instr Course Lect Source Type: research
ConclusionACL reconstruction provides satisfactory knee stability. The risk of subsequent osteoarthritis depends chiefly on the status of the menisci. Residual laxity is also associated with the development of osteoarthritis.Level of evidenceIV, retrospective cohort study.
Source: Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Condition:   Knee Osteoarthritis Interventions:   Biological: Microfragmented Adipose Tissue Transplant;   Drug: Corticosteroid injection Sponsor:   American University of Beirut Medical Center Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Knee Osteoarthritis Interventions:   Biological: Microfragmented Adipose Tissue Transplant;   Drug: Corticosteroid injection Sponsor:   American University of Beirut Medical Center Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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