CANCELLED - Demystifying Medicine - 1) The Challenge of Pandemic Preparedness 2) Current Status of Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

Demystifying Medicine Lecture Series Ebola, swine flu, drug-resistant tuberculosis, diarrheal diseases, and just about anything carried by mosquitoes … These are but a few of the infectious diseases that keep Drs. Fauci and Glass awake at night. Oh, and ticks, too. Threats are everywhere. Every day, it seems, brings outbreaks and the potential for a pandemic. And yet, remarkably, scientists and healthcare providers on the frontlines manage to keep billions of people relatively safe. This Demystifying Medicine lecture by two of the biggest names in global health will provide a broad perspective on the myriad infectious diseases that affect each and every one of us, in countries rich and poor. Pathogens know no borders. You will learn, too, about roles for yourself in preparing for the next pandemic, in whatever form in might take. The Demystifying Medicine Lecture Series is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their applications to major human diseases. The lectures include presentations of patients, pathology, diagnosis, and therapy in the context of major diseases and current research. All clinicians, trainees including fellows, medical students, Ph.D. students, and other healthcare and research professionals are welcome to attend.For more information go tohttps://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.govAir date: 1/7/2020 4:00:00 PM
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

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The coronavirus outbreak has damaged the world ’s No. 2 economy, crippled global supply chains, and threatens to wreak even more havoc on business globally.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Dr. Anthony Fauci, who is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, explains what a pandemic is and says we're nearly at the brink of one with the novel coronavirus outbreak.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 27 January 2020Source: Current Medicine Research and PracticeAuthor(s): K.K. Chopra, Shweta SinghAbstractTuberculosis (TB) has remained a disease of public health importance since ages, affecting more than 10 million people globally and taking lives of 2 million people worldwide every year. Despite the dramatic improvements made in providing high-quality TB diagnostic services, since the discovery of the causative bacilli, many people with TB remain undiagnosed or get diagnosed only after long delays. Ten countries account for 77% of this gap and use only smear microscopy for diagnosis, w...
Source: Current Medicine Research and Practice - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Here are the results of the poll.Do You Believe The COVID-19 Outbreak Poses A Substantial Threat To The Australian Economy When Added To The Drought, Floods and Bushfires We Have Already Seen?Yes 63% (38) No 33% (20) I Have No Idea 3% (2) Total votes: 60 A fairly clear majority vote. Most seem to think all this will knock us about a bit. Any insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual. A very poor turn out of votes. Pity about that - must have been a boring question? It must also hav e been a relatively hard question as 2/60 readers were not sure how to respond. Again, many, many thanks to all those that...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Demystifying Medicine Lecture Series Ebola, swine flu, drug-resistant tuberculosis, diarrheal diseases, and just about anything carried by mosquitoes … These are but a few of the infectious diseases that keep Drs. Fauci and Glass awake at night. Oh, and ticks, too. Threats are everywhere. Every day, it seems, brings outbreaks and the potential for a pandemic. And yet, remarkably, scientists and healthcare providers on the frontlines manage to keep billions of people relatively safe. This Demystifying Medicine lecture by two of the biggest names in global health will provide a broad perspective on the myriad infectio...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS The urge to do something to help in an international medical crisis is understandable and admirable, but the adverse impacts reported by participants here – at every stage of deployment, suggest that preparedness for these missions needs improvement and at the very least, high risk missions should be limited to more seasoned and well trained (for conditions in the field) personnel. While volunteering for a medical mission during a health crisis can be very rewarding, both professionally and personally, it can also be very disruptive and impactful. All volunteers for high risk missions must be made fully a...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
This article reviews the evidence and characteristics of some of the accepted (tuberculosis, measles, chickenpox, whooping cough) and some of the more opportunistic (influenza, Clostridium difficile, norovirus) aerosol-transmitted infectious agents and outlines methods of detecting and quantifying transmission.
Source: Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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