Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Expected to Reduce Human Papillomavirus –Associated Cancers and May Lessen Racial/Ethnic Disparities of Cancer Incidence

This is a public health success story. A landmark report on the effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (4vHP) in the U.S. is now a matter of medical record. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S., with nearly 80 million people infected with some type of HPV at some point in their lives [1]. About 14 million Americans, including teens, become infected each year [2]. HPV causes genital warts and is associated with an estimated 33,700 newly diagnosed cancers every year in the U.S.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 9 December 2019Source: Gynecologic Oncology ReportsAuthor(s): Kumiko Seki, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Rei Hashimoto, Akira Mitsuhashi, Jun-ichiro Ikeda, Makio Shozu
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Source: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
In this study it was assumed that there was no immunity following resolution of natural infection. The modeling demonstrated that a vaccine of moderate efficacy could have a significant impact on the prevalence of gonorrhea if strategically implemented (23). While encouraging it does, of course, depend on the availability of a vaccine. From Ecological Data to Evidence The epidemiological evidence from Cuba, Brazil, and New Zealand demonstrates that N. meningitidis OMV vaccines are possibly able to provide some broader protection against meningococcal disease (17, 24), particularly in older children and adults (25). These...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Did you know certain viruses can cause cancer? Two common examples include hepatitis C (which is linked with liver cancer) and human papilloma virus (HPV, which causes cervical cancer). The discovery of these virus-cancer connections is particularly important, because if a vaccine can prevent these viral infections it may also prevent cancer. And there is preliminary evidence that the HPV vaccine is making this happen. More on that in a moment. What is HPV? HPV is a group of viruses that may cause warts (papillomas) and a variety of cancers, including those involving the throat, rect...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Sexual Conditions Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Attitudes and knowledge about the HPV vaccine and how HPV is linked to several cancers, improved after the presentation. The availability of well-informed graduate students to serve as CHW is an easily sustainable and promising method to improve HPV vaccination uptake and completion among community members as well as promoting cancer education and awareness of primary prevention with the long term goal of reducing health disparities among the Puerto Rican community.Citation Format: Laura Moreno, Miguel Marrero, Lynette Ruiz, Susan Vadaparampil, Julio Jimenez, Anna Giuliano, Gwen Quinn, Teresita Antonia. Extendi...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Health Education: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts Source Type: research
When Charlie Sheen disclosed his HIV infection last fall, sexually transmitted infections were back in the public eye. His case will likely contribute to the belief many people have that HIV is caused by sexual promiscuity or injection drug use, when in reality having unprotected sex with someone HIV-positive just one time can lead to HIV infection. April is STD Awareness Month. The new term for STD is STI -- sexually transmitted infection -- to focus on the infection rather than the disease it could lead to. One way to mark the occasion is to get tested for HIV and thus help eradicate the stigma. A focus on HIV for STD A...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
If there’s something we can do to prevent our children from getting cancer, we should do it. Plain and simple. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that youth be vaccinated against Human Papilloma Virus, starting as young as 9 years old. Human Papilloma Virus, or HPV, is the leading cause of cervical cancer. It can cause other cancers as well in both men and women, and is the cause of genital warts. The vaccine, which is given as three doses over 6 months, is very effective. And yet, some parents don’t want me to give the vaccine, especially when their children aren’t teena...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Health & Wellness In the News Parenting Teen Health Claire McCarthy HPV vaccine sexually transmitted disease Source Type: news
By Stacy Simon Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It’s so common that nearly all sexually active men and women will have it at some point in their lives. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause genital warts and cancer. Almost all cervical cancer is caused by HPV. The virus has also been linked to cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and throat. HPV vaccination for pre-teen and teen girls RESOURCES: Cervical ...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cervical Cancer Prevention/Early Detection Source Type: news
Authors: Feucht C, VandenBussche H Abstract The ideal contraceptive agent remains elusive for the adolescent population. Contraceptive failure is often caused by inappropriate or inconsistent use, and discontinuation within the first year is not uncommon. Various methods have been explored within the adolescent population to increase efficacy rates, minimize side effects, and prevent unwanted pregnancies. The use of intrauterine devices and continuous use of combined oral contraceptives may lead to greater efficacy because of the ease of use and reduction in menstrual symptoms. Recent literature supports the contin...
Source: Adolescent Medicine: State of the Art Reviews - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Adolesc Med State Art Rev Source Type: research
ImageContent(56282d38e4b02f6a900f962d,56282b321200002e007e5b50,Image,HectorAssetUrl(56282b321200002e007e5b50.jpeg,Some(),Some(jpeg)),Visuals Unlimited, Inc./Ton Keone via Getty Images,HPV vaccine in the Netherlands. ) Researchers who study vaccine rates for human papilloma virus, the cancer-causing sexually transmitted infection, are puzzled and alarmed at how low the vaccination rates really are. They speculate that everything from suspicion about new vaccines to apprehension about discussions on sexual activity may be causing parents to reject the shots for their children. But a new online survey conducted...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer in Adolescents | Cancer Vaccines | Cervical Cancer Vaccine | Child Development | Gardasil | Genital Warts | Human Papillomavirus (HPV) | International Medicine & Public Health | STDs | Vaccines | Warts