Deficiency in AIM2 induces inflammation and adipogenesis in white adipose tissue leading to obesity and insulin resistance

Conclusions/interpretationThese results demonstrate a fundamental role for AIM2 in energy metabolism, inflammation and insulin resistance. Our studies establish a novel link between the innate immunity proteins, AIM2 and p202, and metabolism.
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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This article reviews recent articles dealing with in vivo studies of CNPs towards Alzheimer's disease, obesity, liver inflammation, cancer, sepsis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, acute kidney injury, radiation-induced tissue damage, hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury, retinal diseases and constipation. In vivo anti-cancer studies revealed the effectiveness of CNPs to reduce tumor growth and angiogenesis in melanoma, ovarian, breast and retinoblastoma cancer cell-induced mice, with their conjugation with folic acid, doxorubicin, CPM, or CXC receptor-4 antagonist ligand eliciting higher efficiency. After conjugation with tr...
Source: Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Authors: Brenner DR, Ruan Y, Shaw E, O'Sullivan D, Poirier AE, Heer E, Villeneuve PJ, Walter SD, Friedenreich CM, Smith L, De P Abstract BACKGROUND: Although cancer incidence over time is well documented in Canada, trends by birth cohort and age group are less well known. We analyzed age- and sex-standardized incidence trends in Canada for 16 major cancer sites and all cancers combined. METHODS: We obtained nationally representative population-based cancer incidence data in Canada between 1971 and 2015 from the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (1969-1992) and the Canadian Cancer Registry (1992-2015). ...
Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: CMAJ Source Type: research
Insulin resistance and obesity are suggested to have a key role in the molecular pathogenesis of various disorders, including several malignancies. Moreover, insulin resistance has recently been found to be associated with cutaneous and uveal melanoma, while a variable positive correlation between obesity and the risk of cutaneous melanoma was also found at least in men. The present trial aims at confirming whether insulin resistance, assessed with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), is a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma. One hund...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
THURSDAY, Oct. 31, 2019 -- For individuals with obesity, bariatric surgery is associated with a reduced risk for skin cancer, including melanoma, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in JAMA Dermatology. Magdalena Taube, Ph.D., from the...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
In conclusion, our findings link the calcification of the vascular tissue with the expression of FGF23 in the vessels and with the elevation of circulating levels this hormone. Permanently Boosting Levels of Natural Killer Cells in Mice to Increase Cancer Resistance https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/permanently-boosting-levels-of-natural-killer-cells-in-mice-to-increase-cancer-resistance/ Researchers here demonstrate a very interesting approach to immunotherapy: they introduce engineered stem cells in mice that will give rise to additional natural killer T cells, boosting the capability of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Obesity can lead to a chronic systemic inflammatory state that increases the risk of cancer development. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the alterations in tumor non-infiltrated lymphocytes function an...
Source: Nutrition and Metabolism - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
AbstractDespite major improvements in combatting metastatic melanoma since the advent of immunotherapy, the overall survival for patients with advanced disease remains low. Recently, there is a growing number of reports supporting an “obesity paradox,” in which patients who are overweight or mildly obese may exhibit a survival benefit in patients who received immune checkpoint inhibitors. We studied the relationship between body mass index and progression-free survival and overall survival in a cohort of 423 metastatic melan oma patients receiving immunotherapy, enrolled and prospectively followed up in the NYU...
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractAimsOur aim was to investigate the glucose uptake in cancer patients suffering from different entities, using18F ‐FDG positron emission tomography–computed tomography scans. We further aimed at identifying potential variables altering cardiac and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism.Methods and resultsIn a retrospective cohort study, we analysed cardiac and skeletal muscle18F ‐FDG uptake in onco‐positron emission tomography–computed tomography scans in adult patients suffering from Hodgkin's lymphoma, non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non‐lymphatic cancer including patients suffering from thyroid canc...
Source: ESC Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewWe discuss how potentially modifiable factors including obesity, the microbiome, diet, and exercise may impact melanoma development, progression, and therapeutic response.Recent FindingsObesity is unexpectedly associated with improved outcomes with immune and targeted therapy in melanoma, with early mechanistic data suggesting leptin as one mediator. The gut microbiome is both a biomarker of response to immunotherapy and a potential target. As diet is a major determinant of the gut microbiome, ongoing studies are examining the interaction between diet, the gut microbiome, and immunity. Data are eme...
Source: Current Oncology Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 31077337 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
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