Mayo Clinic Minute: How cutting calories helps your heart

Obesity is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says cutting calories may help improve the heart health of many adults, even if they're not overweight. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/kssLdfoYiT8 Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:59) is in the downloads at the end of the post. Please [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

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Physical activity is established as being instrumental in improving physical as well as mental health of not only healthy children but also children with chronic diseases. When good physical activity habits are established in childhood they become habitual and help the development of long-term cardiovascular health in adults. All children should be physically active in order to reduce or perhaps even help prevent childhood obesity. The current recommendations of the WHO call for at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity daily.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: The Editors' Perspectives Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Jeremy Chataway, Floriana De Angelis, Peter Connick, Richard A Parker, Domenico Plantone, Anisha Doshi, Nevin John, Jonathan Stutters, David MacManus, Ferran Prados Carrasco, Frederik Barkhof, Sebastien Ourselin, Marie Braisher, Moira Ross, Gina Cranswick, Sue H Pavitt, Gavin Giovannoni, Claudia Angela Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Clive Hawkins, Basil SharrackSummaryBackgroundNeurodegeneration is the pathological substrate that causes major disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A synthesis of preclinical and clinical re...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The majority of doctors will tell you that there is nothing you can do to reverse fatty liver and that health problems such as cirrhosis and liver failure may be in your future that they will address with the awful “solution” of liver transplant. The truth is the opposite: fatty liver is easily and readily reversible in virtually everybody, provided you take action before irreversible changes take place and are given the right information and tools. In this video, I discuss the three basic phenomena that drive fat deposition, liver damage, and inflammation that lead to this condition: Carbohydrate consumption ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open bowel flora carbohydrates carbs Inflammation NAFLD nash triglycerides undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
(University of Pittsburgh) Overweight and obese vitamin D-deficient children who took a relatively high dose of vitamin D every day for six months had lower blood pressure and improved insulin sensitivity than their peers who took a lower dose. The study did not show improvements in other markers of cardiovascular and metabolic health, a finding that indicates vitamin D supplementation alone may not be the cure-all for children at highest risk for diabetes and heart disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Hyperuricaemia refers to an abnormally high concentration of uric acid in serum [1], typically defined as>7  mg/dL (416 μmol/L) in men and>6  mg/dL in women [1]. Mean serum uric acid has increased progressively over the last century in many populations and the prevalence of hyperuricemia increases with age and is higher in men than premenopausal women [1], as oestrogen increases urate excretion by the kidneys. Hyperuricaemia is usually discussed in the context of gout, but it is increasingly recognised that serum uric acid values>5.0  mg/dL (men) or 4.5 mg/dL (postmenopausal women) are clinically rele...
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
That cancer mortality is declining at a time in which the aged segment of the population is growing, and ever more people are overweight and obese, is a testament to (a) improved prevention (largely fewer people smoking, which has a sizable impact on lung cancer incidence and severity) and (b) the ever increasing efficacy of modern cancer treatments, particularly immunotherapies. These newer cancer therapies are still in the comparatively early stages of evolution as a technology platform, and we should expect these gains to continue. The immunotherapies of the 2030s will be very impressive in comparison to those deployed ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
In recent years, mediation analysis has become a popular means to identify and quantify pathways linking an exposure to an outcome, thereby elucidating how a particular exposure contributes to the occurrence of a specific outcome. When a mediator is a modifiable risk factor, this opens up new opportunities for interventions to block (part) of the exposure`s effect on the outcome. Recent examples in Scandinavian Journal of Work Environment Health have addressed the mediating effect of wellbeing on the association between type of office and job satisfaction (1) and examined whether workplace social capital contributes to the...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
(Natural News) Years of research have established a positive collaboration between estrogen and vitamin D to improve bone health. Now, recent research suggests that this dynamic duo could also play a role in staving off metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Metabolic syndrome is described as a cluster of conditions – such as obesity, high blood...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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