Insomnia in Cancer Patients: CBT-I Is a MainstayInsomnia in Cancer Patients: CBT-I Is a Mainstay

A study in cancer survivors found that adding a wakefulness-promoting drug did not improve on cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) alone. Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis revealed that HBMS programmes in breast cancer survivors appear to have a short-term beneficial effect of improving breast cancer-specific quality of life and global quality of life as measured by FACT-B and EORTC-C30, respectively. In addition, HBMS programmes are associated with a reduction in anxiety, fatigue and insomnia immediately after the intervention. We assessed the quality of evidence across studies as moderate for some outcomes, meaning that we are fairly confident about the results, while we assessed other outcomes as being low-quality, meani...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
In the 25 years since Desert Storm, about 250,000 of the almost 700,000 involved in the Gulf War 1 theater have suffered from some version of the complex of symptoms now called Gulf War Illness. This illness was discussed in a recent symposium co-hosted by the Brookings Institution and Georgetown University Medical Center. While Desert Storm battle casualties were light, military personnel were exposed to various chemical and biological agents. These included Pyridostigmine Bromide, to prevent the effects of nerve gases which had been used previously by Iraq; organophosphate pesticides (such as DEET) which were embedded in...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Organization and Delivery Public Health Quality Department of Defense desert storm Gulf War Illness Research Veterans Veterans Administration Source Type: blogs
Insomnia is a prevalent and persistent side effect of cancer, which if left unaddressed, can be unremitting and negatively influence physical and mental well-being. Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are commonly used non-pharmacological treatments that are efficacious for treating insomnia in cancer patients; however, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of these options. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine which treatments are most effective for which individuals, and patient preference for treatment is a particularly important contributor to adherence and outcomes.
Source: Contemporary Clinical Trials - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
• Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is effective but adherence could be improved.• A wake promoting medication (armodafinil) may help patients adhere to treatment.• CBT-I, with or without armodafinil, improves sleep continuity and sleepiness in cancer survivors.• Armodafinil did not increase adherence to CBT-I recommendations.• Future efforts should focus on identifying those at risk for poor adherence
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conclusions This study supports the use of both CBT-I and MBCR to reduce insomnia severity and suggests the development of mindfulness facets as a method of reducing dysfunctional sleep beliefs.
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions This study supports the use of both CBT-I and MBCR to reduce insomnia severity and suggests the development of mindfulness facets as a method of reducing dysfunctional sleep beliefs.
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Insomnia is an important but often overlooked side effect of cancer. Dysfunctional sleep beliefs have been identified as an important perpetuating factor for insomnia. Mindfulness practice has been demonstrated to improve sleep quality but it is unknown whether these effects relate to changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs.
Source: Explore - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
Insomnia is an important but often overlooked side effect of cancer. Dysfunctional sleep beliefs have been identified as an important perpetuating factor for insomnia. Mindfulness practice has been demonstrated to improve sleep quality but it is unknown whether these effects relate to changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs.
Source: Explore - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
This review examined the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in people diagnosed with cancer. Studies were identified through November 2014 using multiple databases, clinical trial records, and bibliography searches. Inclusion was limited to RCTs of CBT-I conducted in individuals with a cancer diagnosis who had clinically relevant insomnia. The primary outcome variable was sleep efficiency (SE) as measured by sleep diary. Eight studies including data from 752 cancer survivors met inclusion criteria.
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Review Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the efficacy of an early minimal CBT-I to treat acute insomnia comorbid with cancer. PMID: 25746777 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Behaviour Research and Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Res Ther Source Type: research
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