Symptom frequency and change of oldest old cancer patients

AbstractPurposeThe oldest old, described as those aged 85 and older, is a growing cancer population. There are limited studies evaluating the symptoms of the oldest old cancer patient population. Our study aimed to evaluate symptom frequency and clinical symptom change as assessed by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) of the oldest old ( ≥ 85) compared to older adult (65–84) and general adult (18–64) outpatient cancer patients on initial consult and follow-up visit.MethodsRetrospective review of a total of 441 patients, 200 randomly sampled patients in the general and older adult group and 41 consecutive patients in the oldest old group. Chart review was performed for demographic and clinical information including ESAS.ResultsThe oldest old group had less advanced tumors and worse performance status and was receiving less cancer therapy. Eighty percent or more of these patients reported fatigue, sleep disturbance, appetite, and drowsiness. They experienced lower frequencies of pain (p 
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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Overall, higher levels of mindfulness were associated with less pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and sleep disturbance, according to the study published Nov. 8 in the journal Psycho-Oncology.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionsIn our qualitative study, the most common and most bothersome experiences reported by women treated for ovarian cancer were symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain and tiredness; side effects of hair loss, nausea and tiredness/fatigue; and impacts relating to concerns about the future, physical functioning and work limitations. We suggest that clinicians measure these experiences consistently and take them into consideration when making treatment decisions.
Source: The Patient - Patient-Centered Outcomes Research - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
This study identified factors associated with suicidal ideation (SI) among a rarely studied subgroup of Veterans: those with cancer.Methods: Veterans (age M = 61.83) with cancer (N= 175) referred for psychological evaluation completed measures of pain, sleep, depressive, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms. SI was defined by endorsing on paper-and-pencil questionnaire thoughts of killing oneself in the past 2 weeks or during clinical interview.Results: 25.1% reported SI. Compared to those without SI, Veterans with SI had higher ratings on measures of depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms. History of suicide attempt(s) was included...
Source: Clinical Gerontologist - Category: Geriatrics Tags: Clin Gerontol Source Type: research
The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preoperative sleep quality on acute postoperative pain in breast cancer patients. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI) was used to assess the overall sleep status of women scheduled for unilateral modified radical mastectomy in the past month. Based on the responses, patients were allocated to good sleep group or poor sleep group. Postoperatively, acute pain was assessed using the numerical rating score in the first 24 hours; in addition, the requirement of analgesics and the incidence of postoperative complications were recorded. A total of 108 breas...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
Recently I wrote a summary of my readings around cannabis for pain. It’s a hot topic in New Zealand because we’re holding a referendum on cannabis law reform next year, and as expected, all the lobby groups are out in force! My interest is sparked because so many of the people I work with as patients also use cannabis – and the evidence from RCTs is pretty poor. And YET as a recent study colleagues and I carried out with people who have spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain, cannabis is something that holds appeal, and interestingly, seems to provide some useful effects. The study we conducted (see i...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Coping strategies Pain Pain conditions Research cannabis medicinal cannabis qualitative Source Type: blogs
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe studies investigating palliative care in patients with incurable tumours constitute a very small part of cancer clinical research. More than one third of studies examine pain, leaving other palliative issues less explored in clinical research. Furthermore, the results of these studies are under reported in the literature.Legal entity responsible for the studyThe authors.FundingHas not received any funding.DisclosureAll authors have declared no conflicts of interest.
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
If you live with persistent pain of any kind, you’ll know what a flare-up is. Periods of time when pain is exacerbated and sustained at a higher than average level over at least a few days, often longer. Flare-ups always settle down – but oh my, it can feel like they’re going on forever! Handling a flare-up is not quite the same as handling everyday pain. Everyday pain, for those of us who manage it independently of healthcare professionals, usually needs a generally steady routine, not too many surprises. A regimen of movement, relaxation, fun, mindfulness, plodding on and managing stress. A little bo...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping Skills Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Resilience/Health exacerbation flare-up management flare-ups Source Type: blogs
You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurposeWhile older adults with cancer are more likely to develop chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), the study aimed to determine if patient-reported and objective measures of CIPN differ by age among cancer survivors.MethodsCancer survivors with persistent CIPN after completion of platinum and/or taxane chemotherapy completed CIPN questionnaires (severity, interference with activities, sensory, and motor symptoms) and objective testing (light touch, vibration, pain, cold sensation). CIPN measures were compared by age group (
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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