Detecting Kidney Stones Using Twinkling Artifacts: Survey of Kidney Stones with Varying Composition and Size

In recent years, work has been done to understand the mechanisms of Doppler ultrasound twinkling artifacts (TAs) and why they appear over kidney stones. In the work described here, twinkling artifacts were evaluated as a possible method of locating and characterizing kidney stones. Doppler ultrasound scanning was used to evaluate 47 stones of different types and sizes in the range 1.31 –55.76 mm2 in cross-sectional area (average = 9.65 mm2). An isolated stone study was used to understand the behavior of the TAs.
Source: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

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ConclusionsGiant parathyroid adenoma is a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism and usually presents symptomatically  with high calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. Giant parathyroid adenoma is diagnosed by imaging and laboratory studies. Management is typically surgical, aiming at complete resection. Patients usually recover with no long-term complications or recurrence.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Renal colic is a common complaint that presents to the emergency department. It is estimated that 13% of men and 7% of women will develop a renal stone. There is a high probability of recurrence, with 50% within 5 years. Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis without contrast and the ultrasound of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder are the common diagnostic imaging modalities used for diagnosis. Initial treatment includes analgesics and medical expulsive therapy. Most of the patients will pass their stone spontaneously within 3 days. The remaining 20% will require urologic interventi...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Emerg Med Clin North Am Source Type: research
Renal colic is a common complaint that presents to the emergency department. It is estimated that 13% of men and 7% of women will develop a renal stone. There is a high probability of recurrence, with 50% within 5  years. Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis without contrast and the ultrasound of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder are the common diagnostic imaging modalities used for diagnosis. Initial treatment includes analgesics and medical expulsive therapy. Most of the patients will pass t heir stone spontaneously within 3 days. The remaining 20% will require urologic intervention.
Source: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractTypically, the acquired renal ultrasound image includes a course of speckle noises. This paper primarily investigates an approach for the detection of renal calculi by processing those raw US images with the help of a meta-heuristic SVM classifier. One of the major downsides of involving Ultrasound images in medical analysis is the prevalence of Speckle Noises. An Adaptive Mean Median Filter approach has been introduced in the work to get rid of the speckle noises to the maximum extent ever in the literature. Segmentation is performed by employing conventional K-Means and GLCM features were extracted for classifica...
Source: Journal of Medical Systems - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
If you’ve been diagnosed with kidney stones (urolithiasis), you may have several options for treatment. These include medical therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL), and ureteroscopy. A brief anatomy of the urinary tract The urinary tract includes kidneys (two organs that filter waste and extra water from the blood) ureters (two tubes bringing urine from each kidney to the bladder) bladder (organ that collects urine) urethra (a single tube through which urine in the bladder passes out of the body). The evaluation for kidney stones If your symptoms suggest kidney...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Kidney and urinary tract Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
AbstractTo determine whether patients with ureteral stones received different standard of care in the emergency department (ED) according to various sociodemographic factors. We conducted a retrospective study of patients presenting to EDs in a large tertiary-care hospital in the Bronx, New York with a diagnosis of ureteral stones. Electronic chart review was used to assess each patient ’s ED course and to gather socio-demographic information. The primary outcomes of interest were administration of pain medication, prescription of alpha-1 antagonists to facilitate stone passage, and whether or not patients received C...
Source: Urolithiasis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Authors: García-Martín F, Guadalix S, García-Boyano F, Melón Peña N, Martínez Pueyo JI, Callejas Martínez R, Praga Terente M Abstract INTRODUCTION: Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrine disorder characterised by hypercalcaemia and parathormone increase. Decreased glomerular filtration rate (11.2mg/dl (27%), nephrolithiasis (13%), low bone mass (12%), age
Source: Nefrologia : publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Nefrologia Source Type: research
Conclusion: The prevalence of urolithiasis was 13.4/1000. This information can be utilized in formulating future health plans for prevention of urolithiasis in the hospitals within this locality. Résumé Informations de base: L'urolithiasis peut résulter en beaucoup de complications y compris l'insuffisance rénale. Il y a manque d'études scientifiques documentées sur la prévalence de l'urolithiasis à l'Hôpital d'Enseignement Universitaire situé au territoire de la capitale fédérale du Nigéria. Le but de cette étude est d'...
Source: Annals of African Medicine - Category: African Health Authors: Source Type: research
Six months ago, I had severe right flank pain. In the ER, I had an ultrasound showing a possible kidney stone. I deferred a CT scan and went home with medication. I fit the textbook picture: I had abnormal imaging, and I was given a treatment and discharged. I was advised to return if the pain worsened or failed to resolve. I briefly improved, but then the pain returned much worse. Ten days later, I returned to the ER. I was given ketorolac and had a CT, which showed no stone. The ER attending advised me to go home and take ibuprofen. At that point, my pain was 8/10, and I was having significant trouble moving despite the ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Nephrology Pain Management Source Type: blogs
AbstractA 29-year-old patient with normal preanesthetic evaluation was planned for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for right nephrolithiasis with right pyelolithiasis. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation with muscle relaxation. At the conclusion of surgery, when the patient was turned over to supine position, tense abdomen was noted. Immediately extended focused assessment with sonography in trauma (eFAST) was done in which both right and left quadrants of abdomen including pericardial and suprapubic region, right and left thoracic, and both lung basis were examined. Fluid collec...
Source: Critical Ultrasound Journal - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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