Best supplements for cholesterol: These supplements could help lower your levels

BEST supplements for cholesterol: Having high levels of cholesterol is very dangerous to one ’s health. Having high levels of LDL cholesterol increases a person’s chance of having a heart attack and stroke. To keep cholesterol levels healthy, taking these supplements could help to keep you healthy and reduce your risk of serious medical problems.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsAlthough most high-risk patients with T2D and CV disease were on lipid-lowering therapy, only 1:3 had LDL-C 
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Analyst, 2019, Accepted Manuscript DOI: 10.1039/C9AN01679A, PaperKyu Shik Eom, Yijae Lee, Hye Won Seo, Ji Yoon Kang, Joon S. Shim, Soo Hyun Lee An excessive cholesterol level can lead to cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke, hypertension, and myocardial infarction. A non-invasive, painless method of determining the cholesterol in the blood would improve the... The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry
Source: RSC - Analyst latest articles - Category: Chemistry Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Atherosclerosis is a condition of dysfunctional macrophages. Macrophages are responsible for clearing out lipids that end up in blood vessel walls, ingesting these misplaced lipid molecules and handing them off to HDL particles to be carried to the liver for excretion. This works just fine in youth, in an environment of low oxidative stress and few oxidized lipids. Aging brings chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and oxidized lipids, however. Macrophages cannot process oxidized lipids all that well, and so become pathological, turning into inflammatory foam cells packed with lipids, and unable to do more than send sign...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
In patients with diabetes, where cardiovascular morbidity is highly prevalent, recent cardiovascular outcomes trials have identified therapies in the modern glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2i) classes that significantly reduce cardiovascular events. A number of drugs in both classes have demonstrated reductions in the risk of the composite outcome of major adverse cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death). In addition, SGLT2i drugs have a substantial impact on hospitalization for heart failure. Because GLP-1RA and SGL...
Source: Cardiovascular Endocrinology - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Purpose of review To summarize recent data on the role of dyslipidaemia and the benefit from managing this in people with disease of the abdominal aorta and its peripheral branches (peripheral artery disease, PAD). Recent findings Findings from the Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk (FOURIER) trial demonstrate the benefit of intensely lowering low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) in people with PAD to substantially reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events (MACE; myocardial infarction, stroke or ...
Source: Current Opinion in Lipidology - Category: Lipidology Tags: THERAPY AND CLINICAL TRIALS: Edited by Erik S.G. Stroes and Gerald F. Watts Source Type: research
We examined the effects of hs-CRP levels on the prognosis of ACS patients who underwent aggressive lipid-lowering therapy and determined treatment targets for hs-CRP value. METHODS: This post-hoc sub-analysis of a prospective randomized control trial (HIJ-PROPER) included 1734 ACS patients with dyslipidemia, who were divided into hs-CRP quartiles after 3 months of treatment. Primary endpoints were combined all-cause death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, unstable angina, and ischemia-driven coronary revascularization. Secondary endpoint was all-cause death. RESULTS: The median follow-up period ...
Source: Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: J Cardiol Source Type: research
Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsAMI patients in Taiwan with HIS had similar clinical outcomes to those with non-HIS. Using HIS for effective reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is safe in Taiwan.
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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