Diabetes Core Update – September 2019

Diabetes Core Update is a monthly podcast that presents and discusses the latest clinically relevant articles from the American Diabetes Association’s four science and medical journals – Diabetes, Diabetes Care, Clinical Diabetes, and Diabetes Spectrum. Each episode is approximately 20 minutes long and presents 5-6 recently published articles from ADA journals. Intended for practicing physicians and health care professionals, Diabetes Core Update discusses how the latest research and information published in journals of the American Diabetes Association are relevant to clinical practice and can be applied in a treatment setting. This month we review articles on: Oral Semaglutide Monotherapy in Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle Counseling and Long-term Clinical Outcomes Economic Burden of Diabetes in the United States Microvascular Disease and Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Optimal Blood Pressure Target for Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Lack of Durable Improvements in Beta-Cell Function after Medication Withdrawal in Prediabetes For more information about each of ADA’s science and medical journals, please visit www.diabetesjournals.org. Presented by: Neil Skolnik, M.D., Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University; Associate Director, Family Medicine Residency Program, Abington Jefferson Health John J. Russell, M.D., Professor of Family and Community Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Tho...
Source: Diabetes Core Update - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: podcasts

Related Links:

Conclusion: Meta-analyses of all glucose-lowering RCTs involving patients with diabetes provide precise estimates of benefits for CHD and major cardiovascular events after consideration of the resulting ongoing BP difference. No benefit or harm on mortality, heart failure and stroke were noticed, while discontinuations related to adverse events because of treatment were increased following glucose-lowering. The extent of glucose-lowering is proportionally related to changes of CHD and stroke composite, and treatment-related discontinuations.
Source: Journal of Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Tags: REVIEWS AND META-ANALYSES Source Type: research
Having either type 1 or type 2 diabetes leads to a greater excess risk of heart failure in women than it does in men, according to UK and Australian researchers.
Source: Nursing Times - Category: Nursing Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that O-GlcNAcylation of HDAC4 at Ser-642 is cardio-protective in diabetes and counteracts pathological CaMKII signaling. We introduce a molecular model explaining how diabetic metabolism possesses important cardio-protective features besides its known detrimental effects. A deeper understanding of the here-described PTM crosstalk may lay the ground for the development of specific therapeutic concepts to treat heart failure in the context of diabetes. PMID: 31195810 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
The increasing global prevalence of diabetes has been accompanied by a rise in diabetes-related conditions. This includes diabetic cardiomyopathy, a progressive form of heart disease that occurs with both insulin-dependent (type-1) and insulin-independent (type-2) diabetes and arises in the absence of hypertension or coronary artery disease. Over time, diabetic cardiomyopathy can develop into overt heart failure. Like other forms of cardiomyopathy, diabetic cardiomyopathy is accompanied by alterations in metabolism which could lead to further progression of the pathology, with metabolic derangement postulated to precede fu...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Crohn’s Disease in Clinical Remission Is Marked by Systemic Oxidative Stress Arno R. Bourgonje1, Julius Z. H. von Martels1, Marian L. C. Bulthuis2, Marco van Londen3, Klaas Nico Faber1, Gerard Dijkstra1† and Harry van Goor2*† 1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 2Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Gro...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study aimed to compare the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MCT) on endothelial function, oxidative stress and clinical fitness in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thirty-six type 1 diabetic patients (mean age 23.5 ± 6 years) were randomized into 3 groups: HIIT, MCT, and a non-exercising group (CON). Exercise was performed in a stationary cycle ergometers during 40 min, 3 times/week, for 8 weeks at 50–85% maximal heart rate (HRmax) in HIIT and 50% HRmax in MCT. Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) [endothelium-depende...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings limit the possible roles of gene transcriptional changes in previously reported age-dependent pro-arrhythmic electrophysiologial changes observed in Pgc-1β-/- atria to an altered Ca2+-ATPase (Atp2a2) expression. This directly parallels previously reported arrhythmic mechanism associated with p21-activated kinase type 1 deficiency. This could add to contributions from the direct physiological outcomes of mitochondrial dysfunction, whether through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Introduction Atrial arrhythmias constitute a major public health probl...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 April 2019Source: Journal of Sport and Health ScienceAuthor(s): Xin Luan, Xiangyang Tian, Haixin Zhang, Rui Huang, Na Li, Peijie Chen, Ru WangAbstractA growing understanding of the benefits of exercise over the past few decades has prompted researchers to take an interest in the possibilities of exercise therapy. Because each sport has its own set of characteristics and physiological complications that tend to appear during exercise training, the effects and underlying mechanisms of exercise remain unclear. Thus, the first step in probing exercise effects on different diseases is the s...
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions In this review, we analyzed mechanisms through which mitobolites, a distinct set of mitochondria-generated metabolites, can be released from mitochondria and then act as second messengers that contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating longevity-defining processes outside of mitochondria. Our analysis indicates that in eukaryotes across phyla, these second messengers of cellular aging exhibit the following common features: (1) they are produced in mitochondria in response to certain changes in the nutrient, stress, proliferation or age status of the cell; it remains unknown, however, what kind o...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Bartolo Ferraro1,2, Maria Donniacuo3, Loredana Sodano3, Franca Ferraraccio4, Rosa Maisto3, Eliana Gulotta5, Gorizio Pieretti6, Michele D’Amico3*, Maria Consiglia Trotta3 and Barbara Rinaldi3 1Institute for Cardiovascular Prevention (IPEK), Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, Germany 2DZHK, Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany 3Department of Experimental Medicine, Pharmacology Division, University of Campania “L. Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy 4Department of Clinical, Public and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania “L. Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy 5Departm...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Diabetes | Diabetes Type 1 | Diabetes Type 2 | Endocrinology | Health Management | Heart | Heart Failure | Podcasts | Residencies | Science | USA Health