Association of elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide concentration and blood eosinophil count with severe asthma exacerbations

AbstractBackgroundBlood eosinophil count (BEC) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) concentration are established biomarkers in asthma, associated particularly with the risk of exacerbations. We evaluated the relationship of BEC and FeNO as complementary and independent biomarkers of severe asthma exacerbations.MethodsThis observational study included data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database. Asthma patients (18 –80 years) with valid continuous data for 1 year before FeNO reading, ≥ 1 inhaled corticosteroid prescription, and BEC recorded ≤ 5 years before FeNO reading were separated into cohorts. Categorisation 1 was based on the American Thoracic Society criteria for elevated FeNO concentra tion (high: ≥ 50 ppb; non-high: 
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Chronic rhinosinusitis is a long-lasting medical condition, usually caused by infection or exposure to irritants, such as allergies, that affects one in seven American adults. Symptoms include nasal obstruction, nasal congestion, nasal drainage, loss of smell and taste, and facial pain and pressure. Some people with chronic rhinosinusitis also develop additional symptoms, such as asthma and nasal polyps, that are exacerbated by underlying allergies. A nasal polyp is a noncancerous tumor that grows from the lining of the nose or sinuses and affects the drainage system of the sinuses. While chronic rhinosinusitis is not a li...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Cold and Flu Drugs and Supplements Ear, nose, and throat Health Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 September 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Marcia Vervloet, Liset van Dijk, Peter Spreeuwenberg, David Price, Alison Chisholm, Eric Van Ganse, Hilary Pinnock, Cynthia S. Rand, Michelle N. Eakin, Tjard Schermer, Patrick C. Souverein, Alexandra L. Dima, Respiratory Effectiveness Group’s Adherence Working GroupAbstractBackgroundLow inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) adherence is associated with increased asthma burden. This relationship is likely bidirectional, and may vary across adherence stages (initiation, implementation, persistence)....
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe trial demonstrated a favorable safety profile of the SQ HDM SLIT-tablet in Japanese adult patients with AA. The treatment appeared to be efficacious in patients requiring rescue medication (i.e., SABA) at baseline in the efficacy assessment using asthma exacerbation during ICS reduction (JapicCTI number 121847).
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionThere is moderate evidence that high doses of ICS, in addition to SCS, reduces the risk of hospital admission in ED treatment of moderate to severe asthma exacerbations. Further research is required to determine their optimal role in both ED and outpatient settings.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Combination of IL-6 (non-Type 2 asthma) and FeNO or blood eosinophil count (Type 2 asthma) identified asthma endotypes related to asthma severity, exacerbations, and responsiveness to corticosteroids and potential for response to anti-Type 2 and anti-IL-6 treatment.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewTreatment of acute asthma exacerbations involves using systemic corticosteroids and short-acting β2-agonists (SABA). In an effort to limit the burden of systemic steroids, recent studies suggest benefit with the use of inhaled corticosteroids in an acute asthma exacerbation.Recent findingsRecent data has demonstrated benefit from the addition of inhaled corticosteroids to systemic steroids, increasing inhaled corticosteroid dose, and adding a separate inhaled corticosteroid inhaler during an exacerbation. Additionally, inhaled corticosteroid and fast-acting long-acting β-agonist (LABA) ca...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewTo summarize the recent evidence on the various wheezing patterns in early life and provide a case-based review with insights into clinical application of individualized therapy in preschool children with recurrent wheezing.Recent findingsPreschool wheezing is often characterized predominantly by the risk domain with exacerbations and relatively limited impairment. In children with intermittent disease and a positive Modified Asthma Predictive Index, intermittent therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) should be considered as an initial therapy to prevent exacerbations. Early administration of ...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis exploratory analysis suggests that improvements with tiotropium as add-on to ICSs, with or without additional controllers, in 6- to 17-year-olds with symptomatic asthma do not vary according to systemic markers of T2 inflammation, namely, total IgE and blood eosinophil counts.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionReslizumab is an effective and safe option for patients with severe eosinophilic asthma and a history of omalizumab failure.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Despite the low prevalence for all asthma patients, those with severe disease account for a disproportionately large economic burden. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate current direct health care and productivity loss costs associated with asthma patients receiving Global Initiative for Asthma Step 4/5 therapy ("G4/5 asthma") in the United States (U.S.). METHODS: Asthma patients aged ≥12 years were identified in the IBM MarketScan® Research Databases between 1/1/2012‒12/31/2015. Patients were indexed on their earliest medical claim for asthma and were required to have ≥2 ye...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Asthma | Corticosteroid Therapy | Databases & Libraries | Primary Care | Study