A German version of the Cambridge examination for mental disorders of older people with Down's syndrome and others with intellectual disabilities : A diagnostic procedure for detecting dementia in people with Down's syndrome.

DISCUSSION: The German version of the CAMDEX-DS provides an internationally recognized tool for the diagnostics and monitoring of cognitive decline in Down's syndrome. Furthermore, the German version can standardize medical care of these patients. In particular it provides a means of participation in international research trials for this at risk population. PMID: 31399752 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Z Gerontol Geriatr Source Type: research

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Carla M. Startin1,2,3*, Bryony Lowe2,3, Sarah Hamburg1,2,3, Rosalyn Hithersay1,2,3, Andre Strydom1,2,3 and LonDownS Consortium 1Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Sciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom2Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, United Kingdom3LonDownS Consortium, London, United Kingdom Down syndrome (DS) is associated with intellectual disability and an ultra-high risk of developing dementia. Informant ratings are invaluable to assess abilities and related changes in adults with DS, particularl...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
er MQ Abstract There is evidence that frontal-subcortical circuits play an important role in the initial presentation of dementia in Down syndrome (DS), including changes in behavior, a decline in working memory and executive dysfunction. We evaluated 92 individuals with DS (≥30 years of age), divided into 3 groups by diagnosis-stable cognition, prodromal dementia, and Alzheimer's disease. Each individual was evaluated with an executive protocol developed for people with intellectual disabilities and was rated for behaviors related to frontal lobe dysfunction (disinhibition, executive dysfunction, and apat...
Source: Neurobiology of Aging - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Neurobiol Aging Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The CAMDEX-DS can be considered the first valid and reliable instrument for evaluating dementia in adults with DS in Brazil. Its use in such individuals could improve clinical practice and research. PMID: 30365671 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Rev Bras Psiquiatr Source Type: research
mTOR IN DOWN SYNDROME: ROLE in Aß and TAU NEUROPATHOLOGY and TRANSITION to ALZHEIMER DISEASE-LIKE DEMENTIA. Free Radic Biol Med. 2017 Aug 11;: Authors: Di Domenico F, Tramutola A, Foppoli C, Head E, Perluigi M, Butterfield DA Abstract The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of protein synthesis and degradation, longevity and cytoskeletal formation. The mTOR pathway represents a key growth and survival pathway involved in several diseases such as cancer, obesity, cardiovascular disease and neurodegenerative diseases. Numerous studie...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
Abstract Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic form of intellectual disability that leads in the majority of cases to development of early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia (AD). The neuropathology of DS has several common features with AD including alteration of redox homeostasis, mitochondrial deficits, and inflammation among others. Interestingly, some of the genes encoded by chromosome 21 are responsible of increased oxidative stress (OS) conditions that are further exacerbated by decreased antioxidant defense. Previous studies from our groups showed that accumulation of oxidative damage is an early event ...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
Abstract Down's syndrome (DS; also known as trisomy 21; T21) is caused by a triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 (chr21). DS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability attributable to a naturally-occurring imbalance in gene dosage. DS incurs huge medical, healthcare, and socioeconomic costs, and there are as yet no effective treatments for this incapacitating human neurogenetic disorder. There is a remarkably wide variability in the 'phenotypic spectrum' associated with DS; the progression of symptoms and the age of DS onset fluctuate, and there is further variability in the biophysi...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Neurobiol Source Type: research
Purpose of review: Alzheimer's disease is most likely universal in older individuals with Down syndrome, due to having three copies of the amyloid precursor protein gene, resulting in amyloid-beta plaque deposition. Down syndrome is an important population in which to consider clinical trials of treatments to prevent or delay the development of dementia. However, assessment of subtler cognitive changes is challenging due to the presence of intellectual disability. Recent findings: Recent research confirmed that older adults with Down syndrome often present with cognitive decline: more than 80% may experience dementia by a...
Source: Current Opinion in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS: Edited by James C. Harris Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Alzheimer's disease is most likely universal in older individuals with Down syndrome, due to having three copies of the amyloid precursor protein gene, resulting in amyloid-beta plaque deposition. Down syndrome is an important population in which to consider clinical trials of treatments to prevent or delay the development of dementia. However, assessment of subtler cognitive changes is challenging due to the presence of intellectual disability. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research confirmed that older adults with Down syndrome often present with cognitive decline: more than 80% may ex...
Source: Epilepsy Curr - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Psychiatry Source Type: research
Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) in humans with an incidence of ∼1:1,000 live births worldwide. It is caused by the presence of an extra copy of all or a segment of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). People with DS present with a constellation of phenotypic alterations involving most organs and organ systems. ID is present in all people with DS, albeit with variable severity. DS is also the most frequent genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ∼50% of those with DS will develop AD-related dementia. In the last few years, significant progress h...
Source: Molecular Syndromology - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
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