PERSPECTIVES Age-Related Hearing Loss

Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most prevalent sensory deficit in the elderly. This progressive hearing impairment leads to social isolation and is also associated with comorbidities, such as frailty, falls, and late-onset depression. Moreover, there is a growing evidence linking it with cognitive decline and increased risk of dementia. Given the large social and welfare burden that results from ARHL, and because ARHL is potentially a modifiable risk factor for dementia, there is an urgent need for therapeutic interventions to ameliorate age-related auditory decline. However, a prerequisite for design of therapies is knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Currently, our understanding of ARHL is very limited. Here, we review recent findings from research into ARHL from both human and animal studies and discuss future prospects for advances in our understanding of genetic susceptibility, pathology, and potential therapeutic approaches in ARHL.
Source: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Function and Dysfunction of the Cochlea PERSPECTIVES Source Type: research

Related Links:

The barrier between mind and body appears to be crumbling. Clinical practice and public perception need to catch upUnlikely as it may seem, #inflammation has become a hashtag. It seems to be everywhere suddenly, up to all sorts of tricks. Rather than simply being on our side, fighting infections and healing wounds, it turns out to have a dark side as well: the role it plays in causing us harm.It ’s now clear that inflammation is part of the problem in many, if not all, diseases of the body. And targeting immune or inflammatory causes of disease has led to a series of breakthroughs, from new treatments for rheumatoid ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychiatry Multiple sclerosis Depression Dementia Society Medical research Science UK news Alzheimer's Parkinson's disease Schizophrenia Source Type: news
.
Source: Social Work in Health Care - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsConsidering the high prevalence of in particular cognitive impairment, and the diversity of impairments, the cognitive and behavioral aspects of Japanese ALS patients should be given more attention clinically.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeOur aim was to examine whether quality of life which was repeatedly assessed over time is related with the comprehensive assessment of quality of life (QoL) and thereby to validate a brief QoL assessment.MethodThis longitudinal study used a comprehensive assessment of quality of life at baseline (QUALIDEM; 37 items) to validate an eight-item version of QUALIDEM to assess momentary quality of life which was repeatedly administered using a tablet device after baseline. In all, 150 people with dementia from 10 long-term facilities participated. Momentary quality of life and comprehensive quality of life, age, g...
Source: Quality of Life Research - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
__________ We are pleased to share a fantastic professional development opportunity offered by the Luria Neuroscience Institute and featuring renowned neuropsychologist Elkhonon Goldberg, Ph.D., ABPP. Inaugural 5‑day Goldberg Brain-Mind Symposium (February 17–21st, 2020): Dr. Goldberg has been a frequent visitor to Bali for 30 years and is currently engaged in cross-cultural neuroscience research with two major Indonesian universities. He personally designed this unique and comprehensive event to discuss cutting edge cognitive neuroscience and state-of-the-art clinical insights with a small group of participants in...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Professional Development Bali discount code Elkhonon-Goldberg Executive-Functions frontal-lobes Goldberg Brain-Mind Symposia Luria Neuroscience Institute neuropsychologist webinar sequence Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: The programs did not significantly decrease the outcomes measured. However, caregivers identified that inclusion at all stages during hospital admission was a vital factor to reduce stress and increase caregiver readiness. PMID: 31944506 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Australasian Journal on Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Australas J Ageing Source Type: research
With Christmas behind us and the winter months stretching out ahead, for many people this part of the year can feel particularly miserable — and most especially if they suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder. While it’s crucial to head to the doctor if you are finding it difficult to cope, there are evidence-backed self-help methods to boost our mood during winter, which can help us to tackle the January blues and no longer feel as if life is on hold until Spring.  Stay Social It can be tempting to hide away in winter, and a variety of factors can make it difficult for people to socialize even if they wan...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness New Year's Self-Help Seasonal Affective Disorder Winter Blues Source Type: blogs
(Regenstrief Institute) In the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate pros and cons of population screening for dementia, Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers found no harm, as measured by patient reported depressive and anxiety symptoms, from screening for Alzheimer's disease and related dementia in diverse rural, suburban and urban primary care clinics.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionsResults revealed expert consensus and literature review agreement on a number of common modifiable risk factors for T2DM and dementia, as well as agreement on brain-related complications of diabetes. A number of other proposed shared risk factors did not reach consensus agreement suggesting a need for more high-quality studies to add to the evidence base.
Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
More News: Dementia | Depression | Genetics | Pathology | Research | Study