Wall Street traders: how trading affects your hormones…and vice versa.

Paying attention to your hormones pays off. Literally. If you’re a trader on Wall Street, you know how stressful it can be. But did you know that the stress caused by the market’s ups and downs can affect your hormones? And your hormones can affect your health…and your wins and losses. Research shows that when your trades are profitable, your body releases testosterone. Testosterone can make you feel euphoric and dominant—like you can conquer the world. But when the market is volatile, your body releases cortisol, a stress hormone. (Pressure from upper management also contributes to cortisol production; that’s probably no surprise to anyone with a boss.) This data comes from a research collaboration between a Wall Street trader and a neuroscientist who studied hormone levels among traders in London. What happens when your cortisol is up? Your energy gets depleted Blood glucose (sugar) rises Your body shuts down non-essential processes such as digestion You can suffer stress-induced hypertension You may get ulcers Testosterone levels drop in men Women experience irregular menstrual cycles You have an increased likelihood of infectious diseases Cortisol is meant to be a short-term aid to survival. But when you work in a stressful career like trading, cortisol can build up in your body over the years, causing real health problems. What’s more, cortisol can cause you to be more risk aversive—so trades tend to be...
Source: Doctor Kalitenko antiaging blog - Category: Physicians With Health Advice Authors: Source Type: blogs

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AbstractStroke is one of the most devastating pathologies of the early twenty-first century demonstrating 1-month case-fatality rates ranging from 13 to 35% worldwide. Though the majority of cases do occur in individuals at an advanced age, a persistently increasing portion of the patient cohorts is affected early in life. Current studies provide alarming statistics for the incidence of “young” strokes including adolescents. Young stroke is a multifactorial disease involving genetic predisposition but also a number of modifiable factors, the synergic combination of which potentiates the risks. The article analy...
Source: EPMA Journal - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
In this study, hypertension was modeled in rats by feeding a high salt diet (HSD) for 6 wk and exposuring to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during the sleep cycle. We found that OSA combined with HSD increased the severity of hypertension through increasing level of blood Trimethylamine-Oxide (TMAO), release of Th1-related cytokine (IFN-γ) and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine (TGF-β1), and affected the gut microbiome in rats, particularly by depleting Lactobacillus. In addition, expression of PERK1/2, PAkt and PmTOR increased in the aorta from rats with a CIH exposure and HSD. Consequently, treatment...
Source: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, hypertension was modeled in rats by feeding a high salt diet (HSD) for 6 wk and exposuring to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during the sleep cycle. We found that OSA combined with HSD increased the severity of hypertension through increasing level of blood Trimethylamine-Oxide (TMAO), release of Th1-related cytokine (IFN-γ) and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine (TGF-β1), and affected the gut microbiome in rats, particularly by depleting Lactobacillus. In addition, expression of PERK1/2, PAkt and PmTOR increased in the aorta from rats with a CIH exposure and HSD. Consequently, treatment...
Source: Biomedicine and pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine and pharmacotherapie - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Biomed Pharmacother Source Type: research
Short sleep duration and the risk of hypertension: snoozing away high blood pressure?, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41371-019-0177-zShort sleep duration and the risk of hypertension: snoozing away high blood pressure?
Source: Journal of Human Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disease seriously threatening individual health, which results in serious complications such as hypertension and stroke. These complications are associated with oxidative stress triggered by intermittent hypoxia in OSA. Sestrin2 is a crucial factor involved in oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to investigate if a relationship exists between OSA and Sestrin2.MethodsWe prospectively enrolled 71 subjects, and 16 patients of them with severe OSA completed 4  weeks of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy. We measured and compared the conce...
Source: Lung - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions:Hypopnea definition has a major effect on AHI and on OSA prevalence in the general population and, hence, important implications for public health policies. There is a twofold difference in the threshold above which an association with diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome is observed using AASM2007 compared to AASM1999 or AASM2012 criteria.Citation:Hirotsu C, Haba-Rubio J, Andries D, Tobback N, Marques-Vidal P, Vollenweider P, Waeber G, Heinzer R. Effect of three hypopnea scoring criteria on OSA prevalence and associated comorbidities in the general population.J Clin Sleep Med. 2019;15(2):183–194.
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
Introduction:This guideline establishes clinical practice recommendations for positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults and is intended for use in conjunction with other American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines in the evaluation and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in adults.Methods:The AASM commissioned a task force of experts in sleep medicine. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the evidence. The task force developed recommendations a...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and apnea-hypopnea duration on endothelial, ventricular function, blood pressure, and inflammation in a rat model. METHODS: We established a novel rat model of OSA. Wistar rats were randomized to six groups according to 4-week different treatments: (1) OSA (apnea for 60 s in a 90-s window of breathing [60 s/90 s] with anesthesia), (2) OSA 30 s/90 s with anesthesia, (3) partial recovery (60 s/90 s for 2 weeks, followed by 15 s/90 s for 2 weeks with anesthesia), (4) comple...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
This is a case report of a man in his 60s with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, type 2 diabetes, bladder and kidney cancer, and depression who underwent hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation and subsequently demonstrated a Cheyne-Stokes breathing pattern.
Source: JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeWe aimed to investigate the effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and apnea –hypopnea duration on endothelial, ventricular function, blood pressure, and inflammation in a rat model.MethodsWe established a novel rat model of OSA. Wistar rats were randomized to six groups according to 4-week different treatments: (1) OSA (apnea for 60  s in a 90-s window of breathing [60 s/90 s] with anesthesia), (2) OSA 30 s/90 s with anesthesia, (3) partial recovery (60 s/90 s for 2 weeks, followed by 15 s/90 s for 2 weeks with anesthesia), (4) complete recovery ...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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