History of High Motion Sickness Susceptibility Predicts Vestibular Dysfunction Following Sport/Recreation-Related Concussion

Conclusion: Athletes with a preexisting history of motion sensitivity may exhibit more prolonged vestibular dysfunction following SRC, and may experience more affective symptoms early in recovery.
Source: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Original Research Source Type: research

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Clinical Scenario: Low-intensity aerobic exercise (LIAEX) below the threshold of symptom exacerbation has been shown to be superior to rest for resolving prolonged (>4  wk) symptoms following sport-related concussion (SRC), but the effects of LIAEX earlier...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Swedish researchers used ultrasound to discover that athletes who are more...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI provides unique views of youth concussion Studies question link between contact sports and CTE Soccer ball heading more risky for women than men 3D knee model reveals ACL tear same in men, women MRI won gold at 2016 Rio Summer Olympics
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Authors: Henke RD, Kettner SM, Jensen SM, Greife ACK, Durall CJ Abstract Clinical Scenario: Low-intensity aerobic exercise (LIAEX) below the threshold of symptom exacerbation has been shown to be superior to rest for resolving prolonged (>4 wk) symptoms following sport-related concussion (SRC), but the effects of LIAEX earlier than 4 weeks after SRC need to be elucidated. Focused Clinical Question: Does LIAEX within the first 4 weeks following SRC hasten symptom resolution? Summary of Key Findings: Two randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 1 nonrandomized trial involving adolescent athletes (10-19 y) ...
Source: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: J Sport Rehabil Source Type: research
Authors: Hattrup N, Gray H, Krumholtz M, Valovich McLeod TC Abstract Clinical Scenario: Recent systematic reviews have shown that extended rest may not be beneficial to patients following concussion. Furthermore, recent evidence has shown that patient with postconcussion syndrome benefit from an active rehabilitation program. There is currently a gap between the ability to draw conclusions to the use of aerobic exercise during the early stages of recovery along with the safety of these programs. Clinical Question: Following a concussion, does early controlled aerobic exercise, compared with either usual care or del...
Source: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: J Sport Rehabil Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Motion sickness should be considered a preexisting risk factor that might influence specific domains of the baseline concussion assessment and postinjury management. PMID: 31454287 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: J Athl Train - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: J Athl Train Source Type: research
Authors: Houck Z, Asken B, Bauer R, Clugston J Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential predictors of acute post-concussion symptom severity in a university population. METHODS: Data were obtained from the University of Florida Student Health Care Center Concussion Databank. Symptom severity, measured by the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool - third edition Symptom Evaluation (S3SE), was analyzed at 0-3 (n = 99) and 7-14 days (n = 56) post-concussion. Participants were 99 (56 females; age range: 18-30) students from the University of Florida who had been referred to the center's Conc...
Source: Brain Injury - Category: Neurology Tags: Brain Inj Source Type: research
Conclusions: Vision and vestibular problems predict prolonged concussion recovery in children. A history of motion sickness may be an important premorbid factor. Public insurance status may represent problems with disparities in access to concussion care. Vision assessments in concussion must include smooth pursuits, saccades, near point of convergence (NPC), and accommodative amplitude (AA). A comprehensive, multidomain assessment is essential to predict prolonged recovery time and enable active intervention with specific school accommodations and targeted rehabilitation.
Source: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
OBJECTIVE: To compare vestibular dysfunction at 1 to 10 and 11 to 20 days following sport/recreation-related concussion (SRC) in athletes with and without history of motion sickness susceptibility. Secondary aims of this study were to investigate differenc...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Conclusions:We found a significant relationship between the chronicity of symptoms in patients where the injury was related to the workplace and that of patients who had a high initial score of the emotional subscale of the DHI. We did not observe any relationship with the overall scale score of DHI nor with the presence of migraine.Disclosure: Dr. Bisonni has nothing to disclose. Dr. Videla has nothing to disclose. Dr. Norscini has nothing to disclose. Dr. Patrucco has nothing to disclose. Dr. Cristiano has received personal compensation for activities with Bayer, Biogen Idec, Merck and Novartis for honoraria, and travel ...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology I Source Type: research
Conclusion: The VOMS possesses internal consistency and an acceptable false-positive rate among healthy Division I collegiate student-athletes. Female sex and a history of motion sickness were risk factors for VOMS scores above clinical cutoff levels among healthy collegiate student-athletes. Results support a comprehensive baseline evaluation approach that includes an assessment of premorbid vestibular and oculomotor symptoms.
Source: The American Journal of Sports Medicine - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: Head injuries/concussion Head Injury and Concussion Source Type: research
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