What to Do If You ’ re Feeling Anxious Right Now

You have a big presentation. You’re taking an important exam for your license. You’re defending your master’s thesis. You need to talk to your best friend about something that’s been bothering you. You need to talk to your boss. Or you’re about to do something else that’s making you nervous. Either way, whatever the activity, task, or situation, the anxiety feels like it’s coursing through your veins. It feels big and overpowering and dramatic. And all you want is for it to go away. Understandably. Because anxiety is very uncomfortable. And who likes to feel uncomfortable? According to Kimberley Quinlan, a marriage and family therapist with a private practice in Calabasas, Calif., anxiety “tends to show up around the things we value the most in our lives.” It’s common for anxiety to arise in our relationships with family and friends, and in places where we’re forced to face our fears (because of our values), such as flying to visit a friend or giving a talk at work, said Quinlan, owner of CBTschool.com, an online education resource for anxiety and depression. Many of Sheva Rajaee’s clients “get anxious about situations they fear will cause them social rejection, whether that be a fear they will mess something important up and be looked at differently, do something that makes them unlovable, or act in a way that gets them kicked out of the proverbial tribe.” Rajaee is the founder of The Ce...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Career Disorders General Self-Help Stress Work Issues Achievement Anticipatory Anxiety anxiety tips Cbt Courage Managing Stress navigating anxiety self-compassion Stress Relief Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence that for women who experience IPV, psychological therapies probably reduce depression and may reduce anxiety. However, we are uncertain whether psychological therapies improve other outcomes (self-efficacy, post-traumatic stress disorder, re-exposure to IPV, safety planning) and there are limited data on harm. Thus, while psychological therapies probably improve emotional health, it is unclear if women's ongoing needs for safety, support and holistic healing from complex trauma are addressed by this approach. There is a need for more interventions focused on trauma approaches and more rigorou...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Abstract Arabic-speaking immigrants and refugees constitute one of the largest immigrant groups in Sweden. Previous research on Arabic-speaking immigrants indicates elevated levels of psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine the efficacy of an internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment (ICBT) in an Arabic-speaking immigrant population. The intervention was individually tailored based on self-described problems and consisted of nine modules targeting areas such as depression, anxiety and insomnia. In total, 59 individuals were included and ...
Source: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Cogn Behav Ther Source Type: research
This article was originally published on The Conversation. The Study in Context: Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical disease Report: 35% of worldwide dementia cases could be prevented by modifying these 9 modifiable risk factors Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness aging Alzheimer's disease prevention Alzheimers-disease anxiety behavioural marker brain health Brain-Fitness chronic-stress cognitive behavioural therapy Cognitive Debt cognitive decline Source Type: blogs
As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effects spread, concerns about mental health impacts continue to grow. For example, we worry for health and human services professionals whose duties involve higher risk for trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress. Reports of global increases in family violence also suggest that there will be many violence victims and witnesses in need of mental health support. Add to this the potential effects of social isolation, health-related anxiety, and that these mental health problems may persist and worsen long after society goes back to “normal.” And this is all happening as...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Stress Suicide coronavirus COVID-19 Depression pandemic Task sharing Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsNeither traumatic exposure nor baseline symptoms of PTSD predicted the treatment outcomes examined here. Despite improvements in both comorbid depression and anxiety, participation in this pain ‐focused CBT program was not associated with improvements in comorbid PTSD. To the extent that changes in PTSD symptoms did occur, these were mediated by changes in psychological inflexibility during treatment.SignificancePain ‐focused CBT programs yield clinically meaningful improvements in pain and comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety, but may have little effect on comorbid PTSD. This raises the issue of whet...
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Although impressive progress has been made toward developing empirically-supported psychological treatments, the reality remains that a significant proportion of people with mental health problems do not receive these treatments. Finding ways to reduce this treatment gap is crucial. Since app-supported smartphone interventions are touted as a possible solution, access to up-to-date guidance around the evidence base and clinical utility of these interventions is needed. We conducted a meta-analysis of 66 randomized controlled trials of app-supported smartphone interventions for mental health problems....
Source: World Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: World Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: CBT outstands as the preferred therapeutic approach for treating behavioural and emotional disturbances. Also, other related therapies such as dialectical behaviour, mindfulness, and acceptance and commitment therapies have been proposed, and probably in the years to come, more literature regarding their effectiveness will be available. On the other hand, evidence showed that interventions from the field of neuropsychology are minimal if compared with its contribution to assessment. Future research should be aimed at performing studies on more diverse populations (e.g., nonmilitary communities and paediatric a...
Source: Behavioural Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Neurol Source Type: research
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is prema...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Most studies were of poor quality and results should be interpreted with caution. Overall moderate effects were found which decreased substantially when interventions were compared to active control. It is unclear whether meditation, yoga or mindfulness affect academic achievement or affect have any negative side effects. Introduction Rationale Every 12 months, between 7 and 16% of students in tertiary education experience a mood or anxiety disorder and a further 30% of students report experiencing moderate to severe levels of stress (1–4). It is important to tackle poor mental health early as ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This study supports existing research showing promise for the application of rt-fMRI neurofeedback in the treatment of problems like PTSD, addiction and depression that are associated with heightened amygdala activation. The clinical potential of this technique, bridging the worlds of neurobiology and psychotherapy, is clear. That said, fMRI scanning is an expensive business, so it may be a while before a new world of personalised mental health interventions reveals itself. —Training emotion regulation through real-time fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala activity Post written by Eleanor Morgan (@eleanormorgan) for B...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain guest blogger Mental health Source Type: blogs
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