Medical News Today: Hypertension treatment may slow down Alzheimer's progression

New research finds that nilvadipine, a drug doctors commonly use to treat high blood pressure, increases the blood flow to the brain's hippocampus.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

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Authors: Schulz H, Karrasch S, Bölke G, Cyrys J, Hornberg C, Pickford R, Schneider A, Witt C, Hoffmann B Abstract The third part of the DGP statement introduces the current body of knowledge on less studied health outcomes associated with exposure to ambient air pollution: the negative impact on metabolism leading to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes as well as contribution to the development of neurodegenerative disorders and delayed cognitive function in children. Furthermore, prenatal exposure and adverse effects on mother and child are addressed. Finally, the currently discussed biological mechanisms...
Source: Pneumologie - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Pneumologie Source Type: research
We examined baseline plasma β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in relationship to incident dementia during a period of 8.5 years in 2840 subjects age>75 years; 2381 were cognitively normal (CN) and 450 mild cognitive impairment. RESULTS: Increased plasma Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were associated with gender (women), age, low education, creatinine levels, history of stroke, and hypertension. CN participants who developed dementia had lower levels of Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratio compared with those who did not. Aβ levels did not predict dementia in mild cognitive impairment participant...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
According to researchers, there has been a proven link between blood pressure and Alzheimer ’s for years. In 2014, according to the World Alzheimer Report, there were multiple studies that followed large groups of people for 15 to 40 years and showed that those who had high blood pressure were more likely to develop vascular dementia later in life. This is the second-most common form o f dementia after Alzheimer’s disease. Vascular dementia is caused by reduced blood flow to the brain, which…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
We examined baseline plasma β-amyloid (Aβ) levels in relationship to incident dementia during a period of 8.5 years in 2840 subjects age>75 years; 2381 were cognitively normal (CN) and 450 mild cognitive impairment.ResultsIncreased plasma Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were associated with gender (women), age, low education, creatinine levels, history of stroke, and hypertension. CN participants who developed dementia had lower levels of Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratio compared with those who did not. Aβ levels did not predict dementia in mild cognitive impairment participants.Discu...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, analysis of antioxidant defense was performed on the blood samples from 184 "aged" individuals aged 65-90+ years, and compared to the blood samples of 37 individuals just about at the beginning of aging, aged 55-59 years. Statistically significant decreases of Zn,Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed in elderly people in comparison with the control group. Moreover, an inverse correlation between the activities of SOD-1, CAT, and GSH-Px and the age of the examined persons was found. No age-related changes in glutathione reductas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Right now the world is experiencing an epidemic that is projected to get much, much worse. It’s an epidemic of dementia, affecting 50 million people and millions more of their caregivers — staggering numbers that are projected to triple by 2050. The dementia crisis is such a massive worldwide issue that the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a strategic public health action plan, including compiling an organized database of quality dementia research and creating guidelines for the prevention of dementia. The guidelines have just been published, a 96-page document that is summarized here, as well as in th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Exercise and Fitness Healthy Aging Memory Nutrition Source Type: blogs
Looking for clues about the health of your brain? You might want to pay a visit to your eye doctor. Research increasingly links common eye conditions — glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — to risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. What’s interesting about the study results, says Dr. Albert Hofman, chair of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is that cataracts, another common age-related eye condition, had no apparent connection to dementia risk. This gives scientists an important clue about the cause of dementia and Alzheimer&rs...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Eye Health Source Type: blogs
AbstractHypertension and dementia are both common disorders whose prevalence increases with age. There are multiple mechanisms by which hypertension affects the brain and alters cognition. These include blood flow dynamics, development of large and small vessel pathology and diverse molecular mechanisms including formation of reactive oxygen species and transcriptional cascades. Blood pressure interacts with Alzheimer disease pathology in numerous and unpredictable ways, affecting both β-amyloid and tau deposition, while also interacting with AD genetic risk factors and other metabolic processes. Treatment of hyperten...
Source: Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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