New UCLA center focusing on disorders of the esophagus to be named for Robert G. Kardashian

TheDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has established a center for holistic, patient-centered treatment, research and education related to disorders of the esophagus.The new center is named in memory of Robert G. Kardashian, a prominent Los Angeles attorney who died of esophageal cancer in 2003. Kardashian ’s family will launch fundraising efforts to provide resources for the center’s key initiatives and activities.TheRobert G. Kardashian Center for Esophageal Health, which is based in the UCLA Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, combines UCLA Health ’s collective expertise in gastroenterology, surgery, oncology, anesthesiology, radiology, pathology and pediatrics to gain new insights into the causes of these disorders and to develop new prevention and treatment strategies. The Robert G. Kardashian Center will collaborate with the Melvin and B ren Simon Digestive Diseases Center and the Manoukian Division’s Integrative Digestive Health and Wellness Program to provide individualized care to patients.“I am grateful for my friendship with the Kardashian family and this partnership, which will make a difference in patients’ lives for decades to come,” said Dr. Eric Esrailian, chief of the Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases. “We hope the family’s commitment inspires even more suppor t from our community of friends — positioning the Robert G. Kardashian Center as a leader in the prevention...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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AbstractIn the West, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is a long-term complication of damage by gastroesophageal reflux, has been rising over recent decades. Two main factors are likely to account for this increase. The first is the rising incidence of central obesity which promotes gastroesophageal reflux. The second is the falling incidence ofH. pylori infection and associated atrophic gastritis which reduces the acidity and peptic activity of gastric juice, the main factors damaging to the esophageal mucosa. The rise in esophageal adenocarcinoma has been mirrored by a fall in gastric cancer consistent wi...
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Endoscopic screening for Barrett esophagus (BE) is currently recommended for men with chronic (>5 years) and/or frequent (weekly or more) symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) with two or more additional risk factors (age>50, Caucasian, central obesity, smoking, confirmed family history). We hypothesized that individuals with EAC (cases) would be more likely to have frequent symptoms during early to mid-adulthood (age 18 to 50) compared to population controls. Our study aimed to determine whether cases were more likely to experience GERD symptoms through age 50 than individuals without EAC (population controls) ...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Monday abstract Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Reviews on CancerAuthor(s): Ravindran Caspa Gokulan, Monica T. Garcia-Buitrago, Alexander I. ZaikaAbstractEsophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has one of the fastest rising incidence rates in the U.S. and many other Western countries. One of the unique risk factors for EAC is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic digestive condition in which acidic contents from the stomach, frequently mixed with duodenal bile, enter the esophagus resulting in esophageal tissue injury. At the cellular level, progression to EAC is underlined b...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Reviews on Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Balagué C Abstract Early-stage (T1) esophagogastric junction cancer continues to represent 2-3% of all cases. Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent and important type, the main risk factors for which are gastroesophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus with dysplasia. Patients with mucosal (T1a) or submucosal (T1b) involvement initially require a thorough digestive endoscopy, and narrow-band imaging can improve visualization. Endoscopic treatment of these lesions includes endoscopic mucosal resection, radiofrequency ablation and endoscopic submucosal dissection. Accurate staging is necessary in order to provi...
Source: Cirugia eEspanola - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Cir Esp Source Type: research
Abstract The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased in recent decades, and its 5-year survival rate is less than 20%. As a well-established precursor, patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) have a persistent risk of progression to EAC. Many researchers have already identified some factors that may contribute to the development of BE and EAC, and the identified risks include gastroesophageal reflux (GER), male sex, older age, central obesity, tobacco smoking, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication, and the administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antibiotics. The human gut harbor...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
The publication by Torrisi et al. [1] in the European Respiratory Journal evaluated the ability of comorbidities to improve the prediction of survival of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. These variables are in addition to those in the best validated Gender-Age-Physiology (GAP) multivariable prediction model for mortality in IPF. The authors have added to the four parameters (age, sex, forced vital capacity per cent predicted and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide per cent predicted) of the GAP model [2] comorbidities such as gastro-oesophageal reflux, pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer, valvul...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Correspondence Source Type: research
This article summarizes the available evidence on this topic, and highlights specific areas for further research. PMID: 31047035 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Clin North Am Source Type: research
TheDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has established a center for holistic, patient-centered treatment, research and education related to disorders of the esophagus.The new center is named in memory of Robert G. Kardashian, a prominent Los Angeles attorney who died of esophageal cancer in 2003. Kardashian ’s family will launch fundraising efforts to provide resources for the center’s key initiatives and activities.TheRobert G. Kardashian Center for Esophageal Health, which is based in the UCLA Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases, combines UCLA Health ’s collective expertise in ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Esophageal cancer is considered a disease of the elderly. Although the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in young patients is increasing, guidelines for endoscopic evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett ’s esophagus include age as a cutoff. There is a paucity of data on the presentation and treatment of esophageal cancer in young patients. Most studies are limited by small sample sizes and conflicting findings are reported regarding delayed diagnosis and survival compared to older patients.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
While the primary risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) and its precursor lesion Barrett ’s oesophagus (BO) is gastro-oesophageal reflux, the infection withHelicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the dominant risk factor for gastric cancer. Reduction of reflux by dietary measures and proton pump inhibitors has some merits in OAC prevention, and the chemopreventive effect of Aspirin and statins is being widely investigated; however, improved outcome in OAC occurs primarily as the result of secondary prevention. Early detection of neoplastic lesions in Barrett ’s metaplasia can be achieved by surveillance e...
Source: Digestive Diseases - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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