Role of AMPK and its molecular intermediates in subjugating cancer survival mechanism

Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Anand Thirupathi, Yan-Zhong ChangAbstractThe gradual energy dissipation of all organisms allows adapting to energy demands. Pathological situations of uncured diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and other obesity-related diseases are caused by an abrupt energy imbalance. As an energy sensor, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can regulate the cellular energy status. In case of increased energy demands or insufficient nutrient supply, cells digest their own interior, which is called autophagy. AMPK-mediated autophagy regulates various metabolic and physiological processes and is dysregulated in different chronic conditions. Because of AMPK's critical role in physiology and pathology, it is an emerging target for both prevention and treatment of these uncured diseases. This review discusses the multifaceted role of AMPK on cancer cell survival and inhibition mechanism. First, we discuss the dual role of AMPK on cancer progression and suppression, and we discuss how different AMPK subunit combinations influence the tumor progression and suppression. Next, we discuss what could be the centering point of AMPK that supports promotion or inhibition of the cancer cell growth. Furthermore, we review the role of connecting mechanism of AMPK-mediated molecular intermediates on cancer cell survival and inhibition pathways. Finally, we discuss how AMPK can affect DNA damage and repairing mechanisms, and immune respons...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

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New in this year's Obesity Medicine Association update, the document also explores how obesity causes cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver, and cancer.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape FamilyMedicine Headlines - Category: Primary Care Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 20 May 2019Source: Journal of Geriatric OncologyAuthor(s): Elizabeth J. Siembida, Erin E. Kent, Keith M. Bellizzi, Ashley Wilder SmithAbstractObjectivesPhysical activity (PA) promotes physical functioning and health-related quality of life in older survivors of cancer. Using a population-based sample of Medicare Advantage beneficiaries, we aimed to characterize the survivors who reported discussing PA with their healthcare provider.Materials and MethodsData from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries was linked with the 2008–2014 Medicare Health Out...
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Glomerular diseases (GDs) impose a substantial burden on patients and health systems, and they are a major cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) worldwide.1 The causes and clinical features of GD are diverse, yet as a group they share many symptoms, treatments, and outcomes (Table  1). Patients with primary and secondary GDs have mortality rates 2.7- and 3.9-fold higher than the general population, respectively, higher rates of cardiovascular events, and they report impaired quality of life.1 Treatment side effects may include diabetes, poor bone health, obesity, infection, reduced fertility, and cancer, and also a...
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Authors: Zhou J, Huang X, Jiang X Abstract BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is related to the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, which is used as a marker of colorectal cancer. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) has been recently reported to have cancer-promoting effects. The aim of our study was to observe the effect of OSAS on serum levels of CEA in patients with T2DM. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 401 T2DM patients in this study. There were 244 patients with OSAS and 157 patients without OSAS. RESULTS The CEA level in T2DM patients with OSAS was higher than that in those without OSAS (p
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Abstract This paper provides highlights from an expert meeting to explore opportunities to reduce cancer risk and promote health at older ages. Factors that increase cancer risk among older adults include exposure to carcinogens from multiple sources, chronic conditions such as obesity and diabetes, and unhealthy behaviors. Emerging research points to chronic social stressors - social isolation, loneliness, and financial hardship - as being linked to accelerated biological aging and increased cancer risk later in life. Older adults may disproportionately encounter these stressors as well as barriers to preventive...
Source: The Gerontologist - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Gerontologist Source Type: research
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey on May 15 signed into law the strictest abortion ban in the country, sparking fears not only about abortion access, but also about how the policy could worsen disparities that already endanger the health of women living in the south. The law, set to become enforceable in six months, bans nearly all abortions at all stages of pregnancy, with exceptions only for serious threats to the mother’s health. It also makes performing abortions a crime for doctors, who could be convicted of a felony and face up to 99 years in prison. Until the law is enforced, abortion is still legally available in Alabama...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized abortion Abortion Ban medicine politics public health Source Type: news
Ultra-processed foods—the kinds made irresistible by sugar, fat and salt—are ubiquitous in the U.S., making up as much as 60% of the average American diet. But a small, intensive new study published in the journal Cell Metabolism shows that their low price and convenience comes at a cost to health. When people ate a highly processed diet for two weeks, they consumed far more calories and gained more weight and body fat than they did when they ate a less processed diet—even though both diets had the same amounts of nutrients like sugar, fat and sodium. It wasn’t a shock to find ultra-processed foods ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition embargoed study Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewPancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies with 5-year survival of only 8%. A number of reasons account for the high fatality rate including few known modifiable risk factors, no effective screening tools, and lack of early diagnostic symptoms. Therefore, in this review, we aim to summarize existing evidence from major studies concerning (1) risk factors for risk assessment and risk stratification, and (2) screening modalities and early detection markers to better understand the ways to prevent pancreatic cancer or identify it at earlier stages. Improvements in primary and sec...
Source: Current Epidemiology Reports - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
(Obesity Medicine Association) The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) announced the immediate availability of the 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm, with new information for clinicians including the relationship between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemia, and Cancer; information on investigational Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy; treatments for Lipodystrophy; and Pharmacokinetics and Obesity.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
Authors: Nguyen KV Abstract The purpose of this review is to highlight the impact of the alternative splicing process on human disease. Epigenetic regulation determines not only what parts of the genome are expressed but also how they are spliced. The recent progress in the field of epigenetics has important implications for the study of rare diseases. The role of epigenetics in rare diseases is a key issue in molecular physiology and medicine because not only rare diseases can benefit from epigenetic research, but can also provide useful principles for other common and complex disorders such as cancer, cardiovascu...
Source: Nucleosides, Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids - Category: Biochemistry Tags: Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids Source Type: research
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