Benefit-Risk Assessment of Obesity Drugs: Focus on Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists

This article reviews the major anti-obesity drugs and the benefit-risk profiles of the long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) liraglutide and semaglutide (a modified version of liraglutide with longer half-life and tripled receptor affinity). Generally, GLP-1 RAs are well tolerated and induce significant weight loss and lowering of comorbidities. Studies with liraglutide 3.0 mg/day have shown an average placebo-subtracted weight loss of 5.5 kg (range 4.6–5.9) in 1- to 3-year duration trials. One trial using semaglutide 0.4 mg once daily report ed an average weight loss of 11.6% (~ 13.1 kg) after 1 year. Furthermore, semaglutide induced a ~ 6 percentage point larger placebo-subtracted body weight loss in a head-to-head comparison with liraglutide (11.6 vs. 5.5% weight loss, respectively). The safety profiles for both drugs were sim ilar, with transient gastrointestinal disorders being the most commonly reported adverse events. The longest running trial and the most recent trials have not raised any new safety concerns. Long-term trials and post-marketing surveillance is warranted to fully assess both long-term efficacy and sa fety. Future combinational therapies of mimicked gut hormones involved in regulation of energy homeostasis and/or additional lifestyle change in the form of exercise might further improve efficacy.
Source: Drug Safety - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

Related Links:

ConclusionsCaffeine was a marker for increased intake of calories and decreased intake of key nutrients. When discussing dietary intake in early childhood, practitioners should screen for nutrient deficiency in young children and recommend limiting the intake of caffeinated foods and beverages.
Source: Academic Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Putting your child to bed after 9 p.m. is linked to an increase in weight, a new study says, but science is still pondering all the reasons why.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conditions:   Obesity;   Weight Loss Interventions:   Drug: Botulinum toxin type A;   Behavioral: Weight Management Program Sponsor:   Tan Tock Seng Hospital Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Healthy Intervention:   Sponsor:   Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Obesity;   Thyroid;   Surgery--Complications Intervention:   Sponsor:   University of Cagliari Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Journal Name: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Journal Name: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Journal Name: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
The study also suggested that maternal obesity may affect sugar composition in breastmilk.
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - Category: American Health Source Type: news
HEART ATTACKS are often caused by coronary heart disease, and risk of developing this is increased by a high-fat diet, high cholesterol and being overweight or obese. Research in the past has found a link between eating certain foods and heart disease, but a new study has confirmed a popular breakfast food is not as bad as first though.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Diets | Drugs & Pharmacology | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Gastroenterology | Hormones | Marketing | Nutrition | Obesity | Sports Medicine | Study | Victoza | Weight Loss