Persistent disparities in breast cancer surgical outcomes among hispanic and African American patients

Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: European Journal of Surgical OncologyAuthor(s): Elbert J. Mets, Fouad K. Chouairi, Kyle S. Gabrick, Tomer Avraham, Michael AlperovichAbstractBackgroundRacial disparities among patients who receive breast mastectomy and reconstruction have not been well characterized.MethodsRecords of patients undergoing breast extirpative and reconstructive surgery at a high-volume university-affiliated hospital over 5 consecutive years were reviewed. Patient demographics, breast cancer profiles, reconstructive modality, and outcomes were compared by race.ResultsA total of 1045 patients underwent 1678 breast reconstructions during the five-year period. Mean age and standard deviation was 49.8 ± 10.6 years with a BMI of 27.9 ± 6.5. Hispanic and African American patients had significantly higher BMIs (p 
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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Conclusions and implications for cancer survivorsThis ongoing longitudinal study represents a unique resource to better understand breast cancer outcomes, patient-reported symptoms, and health-related quality of life among Black breast cancer survivors.
Source: Journal of Cancer Survivorship - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Ines Barone, Cinzia Giordano, Daniela Bonofiglio, Sebastiano Andò, Stefania CatalanoAbstractThe escalating epidemic of overweight and obesity is currently recognized as one of the most significant health and economic concern worldwide. At the present time, over 1.9 billion adults and more than 600 million people can be, respectively, classified as overweight or obese, and numbers will continue to increase in the coming decades. This alarming scenario implies important clinical implications since excessive adiposity can pr...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Traditional 30-day readmission rates are not an adequate quality metric for breast reconstruction given the number of late postoperative readmissions, many of which lead to explantation. Early and late infectious readmissions have different predictors. Interventions targeting these predictors may decrease the number of readmissions, thus reducing cost and improving quality. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Risk, III.
Source: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Breast: Original Articles Source Type: research
Prevention is often called the best medicine — but research has shown that millions of Americans are not getting the preventive care they should to live long, healthy lives. Obstacles like inadequate access to care and financial barriers can keep people away from the doctor, but anxiety and feeling like care is unnecessary are also common deterrents. “There are a lot of things that every person could do to stay healthy, and this could help people to feel better, improve their quality of life and help them to live longer,” says Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth Univer...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Longevity public health Source Type: news
Conclusions In this review, we analyzed mechanisms through which mitobolites, a distinct set of mitochondria-generated metabolites, can be released from mitochondria and then act as second messengers that contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating longevity-defining processes outside of mitochondria. Our analysis indicates that in eukaryotes across phyla, these second messengers of cellular aging exhibit the following common features: (1) they are produced in mitochondria in response to certain changes in the nutrient, stress, proliferation or age status of the cell; it remains unknown, however, what kind o...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Dan Hu1†, Meijin Zhang2†, Hejun Zhang1, Yan Xia1, Jinxiu Lin2, Xiongwei Zheng1, Feng Peng2* and Wenquan Niu3* 1Department of Pathology, Fujian Cancer Hospital &Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, China 2Department of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China 3Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China Background and Objectives: Growing evidence indicates that metabolic syndrome confers a differential risk for the development and progression of many types of cancer, especially in the digestive tr...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: The incidence rate of non-communicable diseases increased over the decade and was associated with increased mortality and disability, reduced quality of life, and increased health-care costs, indicating an urgent need to establish prevention and control programs. The rising trend in the incidence of cancers may also become a health care issue in Saudi Arabia in the coming years. PMID: 30834424 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Saudi Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Saudi Med J Source Type: research
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