A Retrospective Critical Analysis and Risk Stratification of Penicillin Allergy Delabeling in a UK Specialist Regional Allergy Service

Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 7, Issue 1Author(s): Omar E. Mohamed, Sarah Beck, Aarnoud Huissoon, Cathryn Melchior, Jane Heslegrave, Richard Baretto, Anjali Ekbote, Mamidipudi Thirumala KrishnaBackgroundA spurious label of penicillin allergy (Pen-A) negatively impacts on antibiotic stewardship and health care costs. Recent studies have proposed a guideline-steered direct penicillin challenge without undertaking allergy tests when “true allergy” is unlikely.ObjectiveTo critically analyze Pen-A clinical presentation, perform risk stratification, and determine clinical predictors for “true allergy.”MethodData were extracted retrospectively from clinical and electronic patient records.ResultsA total of 231 patients (M = 82; F =149; mean age 51.22 [standard deviation ± 18.07] years) were analyzed. Based on clinical history, patients were categorized as likely type I hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) (n = 27), likely type IV HSR (n = 65), indeterminate (n = 111), and HSR unlikely (n = 28). Based on an index reaction and comorbidities, patients were classified into “low risk” (n = 143) and “high risk” (n = 78). Pen-A was excluded in 74% of patients assessed having likely type I HSR, 91% with likely type IV HSR, 93% of indeterminate, and 100% of HSR unlikely patients. The negative predictive value for successful delab...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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ConclusionAlthough the majority of ARs during OIT are non anaphylactic, AARs occur frequently. Children with higher sIgE for alpha-lactalbumine and casein at baseline seem to be at higher risk for AARs during OIT.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: An observation time of ≥6 h after resolution of an initial anaphylaxis symptom can exclude recurrence of a secondary reaction in #x3e; 95% of patients. Although longer observation periods resulted in the detection of more biphasic reactions, 6–12 h of observation time would be practical, supporting current relevant gu idelines.Int Arch Allergy Immunol
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
(Natural News) Most allergies hit a person immediately after exposure: Symptoms are bound to develop immediately, from itchy hives to swelling, and even anaphylactic shock. The reactions can be dangerous and potentially fatal, but most of these can be identified and treated immediately. However, some people experience allergic reactions that seem to come out of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Drugs are the most frequent cause of fatal anaphylaxis worldwide(1). The prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including allergy, is known to be related to drug exposure frequency, gender, age, ethnicity and genetic factors, and it varies according to the classes of drugs, definitions of hypersensitivity reactions (HRs) and study design. Drug usage patterns vary significantly with time and geography, both across large countries and around the world(1-3).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 February 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Johana Gil-Serrano, Victoria Cardona, Olga Luengo, Mar Guilarte, Anna Sala-Cunill, Paula Galvan-Blasco, Moises Labrador-Horrillo
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
PMID: 30769181 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Allergic disorders are a common clinical disorders with high rates of health care usage.1 Studies from developed countries have suggested an increasing prevalence of allergic diseases. 2 –4 However, the data on the epidemiology of anaphylaxis, angioedema and urticaria are limited, with only small cohort studies available. 1,4 Recent studies from the United Kingdom (UK) and Australia have noted marked increase in hospitalizations related to urticaria, angioedema and anaphylaxis.1,4 Epidemiological study and incidence data of these conditions, however, depend on several factors, including diagnostic criteria used, vari...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Tabussam Tufail, Farhan Saeed, Huma Bader Ul Ain, Bushra Niaz, Muhammad Afzaal, Ahmad Din, Hafiz Ansar Rasul SuleriaAbstractBackgroundCashew nut allergy is a significant tree nut allergy that is increasing gradually and becoming serious health issue these days. Allergens responsible for cashew nut allergy are highly potent and for some people, these reactions have the potential to be severe and even life-threatening (anaphylaxis). Increased consumption of cashew nuts and a change in eating and cooking may be responsi...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Limited studies conducted on children
Source: Allergologia et Immunopathologia - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Allergol Immunopathol (Madr) Source Type: research
A histamine metabolite, imidazole acetic acid (IAA), recapitulates key histamine-driven biology, including recruitment of eosinophils, induction of itch, and induction of anaphylaxis. IAA may perpetuate anaphylactic and other allergic responses after the initial release and metabolism of histamine.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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