Alternations of interhemispheric functional connectivity in corneal ulcer patients using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity: a resting state fMRI study.

Alternations of interhemispheric functional connectivity in corneal ulcer patients using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity: a resting state fMRI study. Acta Radiol. 2018 Nov 27;:284185118815308 Authors: Shi WQ, Liu JX, Yuan Q, Ye L, Su T, Jiang N, Lin Q, Min YL, Li B, Zhu PW, Xu XW, Shao Y Abstract BACKGROUND: Corneal ulcer (CU) is the second ocular disease leading to blindness. Millions of people around the world suffer from CU. However, the relationship between CU and altered functional connectivity in the brain is still unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations of the brain interhemispheric functional connectivity (FC) in patients with CU using the voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) method and their relationship with clinical manifestations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study involved 24 patients with CU (12 men, 12 women) and 24 healthy controls (HCs) with their age, sex, and weight closely matched. Independent sample t-test, VMHC method, and Pearson's correlation analysis were applied. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to estimate the effect in distinguishing CU patients from HCs. RESULTS: The CU patients showed decreased VMHC values in bilateral lingual/calcarine, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus compared with HCs. There were positive correlations between Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and VMHC values of bilateral media frontal...
Source: Acta Radiologica - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Acta Radiol Source Type: research

Related Links:

AbstractComplications of diabetes mellitus (DM) have had an important impact on public health; in particular, diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can cause blindness and visual impairment, has an annual incidence ranging from 2.2% to 12.7% (Sabanayagam et al., 2018). Laser retinal photocoagulation (LRP) is the first ‐line treatment for DR (Evans et al., 2014). Despite the use of anaesthetic eye drops, pain intolerance during LRP may compromise its efficacy by impacting patient adherence to treatment. A study by Chen et al. (2012) revealed that music may be useful for reducing anxiety but not pain during treat ment with intr...
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: LETTER TO THE EDITOR Source Type: research
We describe herein an unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies and permanent monocular visual loss following RR for trigeminal neuralgia.
Source: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
A 45-year-old woman with Usher syndrome, associated congenital deafness, progressive blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa, and latent autoimmune diabetes presented to the emergency department with malaise, dizziness, and pelvic pain following removal of an intrauterine device. A posterior vaginal wall mass was found on examination. Laboratory values demonstrated anemia, thrombocytopenia, and an elevated white blood cell count, raising concern for infection and potential onset of diabetic ketoacidosis. This prompted a peripheral blood smear review, which showed 60% monocytic blasts. A subsequent vaginal mass biopsy showed ...
Source: Pathology Case Reviews - Category: Pathology Tags: Case Reviews Source Type: research
Three researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received awards totaling more than $18 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state’s stem cell agency. The recipients areDr. Sophie Deng, professor of ophthalmology at the UCLA Stein Eye Institute;  Yvonne Chen, a UCLA associate professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics; andDr. Caroline Kuo, a UCLA assistant clinical professor of pediatrics. The awards were announced at a CIRM meeting today.Deng ’s four-year, $10.3 million award ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Robert Chelsea turned down the first face he was offered. It was a fine face, one that could have taken him off the transplant waiting list after just a couple months. But Chelsea—severely disfigured after a catastrophic car accident five years earlier—was in no hurry. He’d gotten used to tilting his head back so food and water wouldn’t fall out of his nearly lipless mouth. He knew how to respond compassionately to children who stared in shock and fear. The face, offered in May 2018, had belonged to a man with skin that was much fairer than what remained of Chelsea’s—so light that Chelse...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Dinesh Selvarajah, Debasish Kar, Kamlesh Khunti, Melanie J Davies, Adrian R Scott, Jeremy Walker, Solomon TesfayeSummaryDiabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of both type 1 and 2 diabetes. It is a leading cause of lower-limb amputation and disabling neuropathic pain. Amputations in patients with diabetes have a devastating effect on quality of life and are associated with an alarmingly low life expectancy (on average only 2 years from the amputation). Amputation also places a substantial financ...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Are you so happy that you can’t understand depression? Not us! While Gabe and Jackie can’t relate to that level of positivity, there are lots of people in the world who simply can’t fathom what depression feels like. Despite their best efforts, naturally happy people can have a hard time understanding depression and in Episode 2, we discuss how to explain depression to happy people, including both of our spouses who are, to be honest, annoyingly peppy. We give tips on how to approach the topic and share our own personal experiences of having this hard-to-understand conversation. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Depression Family Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
Authors: Berger EA Abstract Keratitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory condition of the cornea that can be caused by both infectious and non-infectious agents. Physical or chemical trauma are typically related to non-infectious keratitis, which may then become secondarily infected or remain non-infected. Etiology of infectious keratitis is most often associated with bacteria; but viruses, fungi, and parasites are common causative pathogens as well. As a global concern, common risk factors include: systemic immunosuppression (secondary to malnutrition, alcoholism, diabetes, steroid use), previous corneal surgery ...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotic treatment may reduce the risk of active trachoma and ocular infection in people infected with C trachomatis, compared to no treatment/placebo, but the size of the treatment effect in individuals is uncertain. Mass antibiotic treatment with single dose oral azithromycin reduces the prevalence of active trachoma and ocular infection in communities. There is no strong evidence to support any variation in the recommended periodicity of annual mass treatment. There is evidence of an increased risk of antibiotic resistance at 12 months in communities treated with antibiotics. PMID: 31554017 [Pub...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Multivitamins, drugs, gene therapies, human skin, heart, eyeballs, kidneys, entire dead bodies – everything comes with a price tag. Putting aside the moral questions of why and how come that the capitalist market priced even our body parts and health, we asked the question of how much is life worth: what is the maximum that you would/should pay for a life-saving drug? How high is too high a cost if a drug can save 200-300 babies a year from debilitating illness or death? And ultimately, does the pricing of new technologies, especially gene therapies, enable to fulfill their promise? There’s a price for ever...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Biotechnology Future of Pharma Genomics cost daraprim drug drug price Gene gene therapy genetics insulin life medication pricing policy rare disease rare disorder Source Type: blogs
More News: Blindness | Brain | Neurology | Opthalmology | Pain | Radiology | Study | Women