AHA: Lung Scans of COPD Patients Can Reveal Heart Disease — and Death Risk

Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Pulmonology, News, Source Type: news

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TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- People with the chronic lung disease known as COPD often get chest CT scans so that doctors can look inside their lungs. A new study is advising physicians to also take a careful look at the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
LH, Edner M Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%, managed in both Primary- and Hospital based outpatient clinics separately with their prognosis, comorbidities and risk factors. Further to compare the heart failure medication in the two groups. DESIGN: We used the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry to include 9654 out-patients who had HF and EF ≥40%, 1802 patients were registered in primary care and 7852 in hospital care. Descriptive statistical tests were used to analyze base line characteris...
Source: Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Scand J Prim Health Care Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Widening educational inequalities in obesity and smoking prevalence are expected in several European countries if current trends in obesity and smoking prevalence are unaltered. This will impact on inequalities in morbidity and mortality of associated diseases such as diabetes, coronary heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID: 29516788 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Public Health Source Type: research
Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Authors: Ohgiya M, Matsui H, Tamura A, Kato T, Akagawa S, Ohta K Abstract Objective In 2011, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classification categorized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients into 4 groups. A report demonstrated that the mortality in Group B was higher than that in Group C. Ischemic heart disease and cancer were suggested to be the cause. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) are more prevalent in Group B than Group C and that they may be responsible for the higher mortality in Group B. Met...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Conclusions: Alterations to RV structure may represent a mechanism by which long-term PM10–2.5 exposure increases risks for adverse respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes, especially among certain susceptible populations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP658 Received: 14 June 2016 Revised: 24 February 2017 Accepted: 16 March 2017 Published: 27 July 2017 Address correspondence to S. D. Adar, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH II-5539, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA. Telephone: (734) 615-9207; Email: sadar@umich.edu Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/E...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
In this study, researchers analysed data of millions of British patients between 1995 and 2015 to see if this claim held true. They tracked people who were obese at the start of the study, defined as people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, who had no evidence of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes at this point. They found these people who were obese but "metabolically healthy" were at higher risk of developing heart disease, strokes and heart failure than people of normal weight. No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds Several studies in the pas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
As examinations of aging go, this open access overview of kidney decline and kidney disease is more focused on the mechanics of the problem than most, which makes it an interesting read. As a bonus, it opens by touching on the thorny topic of whether aging is a disease, and where the arbitrary boundary lies between aging and disease. Kidney disease is not as large a problem in our species as heart disease and cancer, but that is only because most people are killed by something else first. Age-related fibrosis eats away at kidney tissue until there is no longer enough left fully functional to do its job. It is an unpleasant...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
We present a case of severe pulmonary valve stenosis secondary to carcinoid heart disease, treated successfully with percutaneous valve replacement. A 67-year-old man with severe pulmonary valve stenosis was referred to our center for pulmonary valve replacement. The patient had a history of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the small bowel with carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, and tricuspid valve regurgitation previously treated with surgical valve replacement. Because of the patient's severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hostile chest anatomy seen on a computed tomographic scan dating from previo...
Source: Texas Heart Institute Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Tex Heart Inst J Source Type: research
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