Coxsackievirus B5 Aseptic Meningitis in Infants in Chiba Prefecture, Japan, in 2016.

CONCLUSION: These results indicate that viral screening of sewage water may help detect occult outbreaks of viral infection, particularly for enterovirus strains. PMID: 30135347 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Nippon Medical School - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: J Nippon Med Sch Source Type: research

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In this study, we investigated the antiviral effect of salvianolic acid B (SalB) on EV71. SalB is a major component of the Salvia miltiorrhiza root and has been shown to be an effective treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhages, and myocardial infarctions. HeLa cells were cultured in 12-well plates and treated with SalB (100 or 10 μg/mL) and 106 PFU/mL of EV71. SalB treatment (100 µg/mL) significantly decreased the cleavage of the eukaryotic eIF4G1 protein and reduced the expression of the EV71 capsid protein VP1. In addition, SalB treatment showed a dramatic decrease in viral infection, measured by immunofluorescenc...
Source: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On e...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs
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Source: Journal of Medical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
Enteroviruses (EVs) are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, including aseptic meningitis (AM), encephalitis, hand, foot and mouth disease, acute flaccid paralysis, and acute flaccid myelitis. Epidemics occur sporadically and are associated with increased cases of AM in children. The present study describes the seroepidemiological analysis of circulating EVs in Ireland from 2005 to 2014 and phylogenetic characterization of echovirus 30 (E‐30), enterovirus A71 (EV‐A71), and enterovirus D68 (EV‐D68). EV VP1 genotyping was applied to viral isolates and clinical samples, including cerebrospinal flui...
Source: Journal of Medical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Enteroviruses are among the most common human viruses around the world. More than 100 different serotypes that can cause a range of clinical pathologies have been identified, although the most frequent are those that affect the central nervous system, such as aseptic meningitis, encephalitis or paralysis, which in some cases can be very severe or even fatal. In recent years, enterovirus outbreaks associated to new diseases have been reported all over the world, and as a result some serotypes have been considered 'emerging' pathogens. Yet, our knowledge about these viruses, especially about the non-polio e...
Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
Source: Journal of Medical Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Letter To The Editor Source Type: research
Authors: Lee KY Abstract Since the outbreak of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection in Malaysia in 1997, large epidemics of EV71 have occurred in the Asia-Pacific region. Many children and infants have died from serious neurological complications during these epidemics, and EV71 infection has become a serious public health problem in these areas. EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children, and usually resolves spontaneously. However, EV71 occasionally involves the central nervous system (CNS), and induces diverse neurological complications such as brainstem encephalitis, aseptic meningitis...
Source: Korean Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Korean J Pediatr Source Type: research
Abstract Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious viral disease and mainly affects infants and young children. The main manifestations are fever, vesicular rashes on hand, feet and buttocks and ulcers in the oral mucosa. Usually, HFMD is self-limiting, but a small proportion of children may experience severe complications such as meningitis, encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and neurorespiratory syndrome. Historically, outbreaks of HFMD were mainly caused by two enteroviruses: the coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and the enterovirus 71 (EV-A71). In the recent years, coxsackievirus A6 and coxsackievirus ...
Source: Medical Microbiology and Immunology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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