Melodic intonation therapy in post-stroke nonfluent aphasia: a randomized pilot trial.

CONCLUSION: Melodic Intonation Therapy might have a positive effect on the communication skills of stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia as measured by the CAL questionnaire. A full-scale trial with at least 27 patients per group is necessary to confirm these results. PMID: 30056747 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Delirium is common after intracerebral hemorrhage, but severe neurologic deficits may confound its assessment and lead to underdiagnosis. The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist’s inclusion of nonverbal features may make it more accurate than the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU in patients with neurologic deficits, but novel tools designed for such patients may be warranted.
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Neurologic Critical Care Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2020Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 67Author(s): Laura L. Wood, Dani Bryant, Kerryann Scirocco, Hia Datta, Susan Alimonti, Dave MowersAbstractAphasia, most often caused by brain damage due to stroke, is a language disorder hindering one's ability to verbally express and/or comprehend language, ranging in severity from mild to severe. An Applied Thematic Analysis (ATA) was undertaken of a post-production focus group to evaluate a 12-week pilot program that used the CoActive Therapeutic Theater (CoATT) Model for persons in Aphasia recovery. Results of a focus group interview found five th...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 December 2019Source: Journal of the Saudi Heart AssociationAuthor(s): Carlos Minguito-Carazo, Tomás Benito-González, Julio Cesar Echarte-Morales, Mario Castaño-Ruiz, Felipe Fernández-VázquezAbstractA 78-year-old woman with history of transient ischemic attack was admitted for sudden aphasia. In order to assess a potential cardioembolic source an echocardiogram was performed revealing a large mass consistent with a thrombus in transit through a patent foramen ovale. Due to the high risk of systemic embolism emergent surgical thrombectomy was performed,...
Source: Journal of the Saudi Heart Association - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Can you distinguish the taste of a red wine versus a rosé? How about the look of a 1960s muscle car versus a foreign import? Do you prefer to grow lilies or tulips? Would you rather listen to Dark Side of the Moon or “Fly Me to the Moon”? To answer any of these questions, you need to use your semantic memory. Your semantic memory is your store of factual knowledge of the world and the meaning of words. It’s how you know that a fork is for eating (not twirling your hair) and what color a lion is. It’s both the source of your vocabulary and how you know what something does even if you don&rsquo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs
Abstract The present study aims at investigating verb inflection in aphasia and semantic dementia. In particular, it addresses the contribution of time reference and morphological complexity. Moreover, it investigates whether the lexical properties of the verb, such as argument structure and lexical aspect interact with the production of tense. Ten individuals with (different types of) stroke aphasia and five individuals with semantic dementia and their respective control groups conducted a sentence completion task. Three tenses were tested: past perfective, past imperfective and present. All tenses had to be prod...
Source: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Clin Linguist Phon Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The TDQ-30 has the potential to become a valuable picture-naming test for the diagnosis of mild anomia associated with pathological aging. PMID: 31792492 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Arch Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
Conclusions: The relatively high incidence of CA in our study suggests that bi-hemispheric language representation may be more prevalent in Bengali speakers than in speakers of other languages. The absence of crossed Wernicke aphasia in our study participants may represent a left-hemispheric advantage for receptive language abilities in Bengali speakers. Further studies are required to clarify whether idiosyncrasies in the Bengali language may be responsible for the differential brain representation of language seen in our study participants.
Source: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Abstract: A 34-year-old man with chronic neck pain was treated with regular cervical paravertebral ozone injections. After his last injection, he experienced a syncopal episode and, upon awakening, was found to have ataxia, aphasia, hemiparesis, and left sixth nerve palsy. Computed tomographic angiography demonstrated intra-arterial gas in the right vertebral artery; multiple posterior circulation infarcts were seen on brain MRI. This case illustrates the potential dangers of paravertebral injections of ozone.
Source: Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: Photo Essay Source Type: research
This article presents an Applied Thematic Analysis (ATA) of a post-production focus group exploring a 12-week pilot program that used the CoActive Therapeutic Theater (CoATT) Model for persons in Aphasia recovery. Results of a focus group interview found five themes that participants noted as unique outcomes: 1) More meaningful relationships; 2) An increased belief in oneself; 3) An invigorating experience; 4) CoATT provides a unique healing opportunity; 5) Perceived language and speech improvement.
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Nature Reviews Neurology, Published online: 26 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41582-019-0282-1Some individuals with post-stroke language impairment, or aphasia, will spontaneously recover partial language function. In this Review, the authors propose that existing hypotheses about this recovery from aphasia can be considered as examples of two principles: degeneracy and variable neuro-displacement.
Source: Nature Reviews Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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