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Rapid Medical launches Tigertriever registry study
Neurovascular device maker Rapid Medical said it launched a registry study of its Tigertreiver controllable stent retriever. The Israel-based company touts the Tigertriever as the only controllable, fully-visible stent retriever which can be adjusted by the physician to fit in the dimensions of the blocked blood vessel. The newly launched European multi-center registry study looks to enroll patients in France and Switzerland, and will be the 1st to examine the use of the Tigertriever in a real-life setting. The company said it has enrolled its 1st patient in the trial at Switzerland’s Cantonal Hospital of L...
Source: Mass Device - September 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Catheters Clinical Trials Stents rapidmedical Source Type: news

Technology-based rehabilitation to improve communication after acquired brain injury - Des Roches CA, Kiran S.
The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Modularity metric summarizes network fragmentation to explain aphasia recovery differences
(Medical University of South Carolina) Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) investigators report in the August, 2017, Scientific Reports - Nature, that white matter network fragmentation in relatively spared brain areas explains variations in aphasia recovery after strokes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aphasia recovery via speech therapy related to structural plasticity of the ventral stream
(Medical University of South Carolina) Strengthening the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) via speech therapy is associated with significant semantic error reductions in aphasic stroke patients, report Medical University of South Carolina investigators in an article published online June 19, 2017 by Annals of Neurology. These findings suggest that speech recovery is related to the structural plasticity of the residual language network, that semantic skills are integrated by the ILF and that strengthening the ILF is possible with therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding Aphasia After Brain Injury
June is National Aphasia Awareness Month, and I wanted to share some of what I have learned on my journey through aphasia after brain injury. According to Wikipedia, the term aphasia implies that one or more communication modalities in the brain have been damaged—and are therefore functioning incorrectly. The difficulties for people with aphasia can range from occasional trouble finding words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write; their intelligence, however, is unaffected. Since no two brain injuries are ever the same, the way aphasia affects one person can vary greatly from the next person. In my own expe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding Aphasia After Brain Injury
Just because you have word-finding problems does not mean you have diminished intelligence! (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New intervention brings hope to patients with primary progressive aphasia
(Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care) A Baycrest Health Sciences researcher and clinician has developed the first group language intervention that helps individuals losing the ability to speak due to a rare form of dementia, and could help patients maintain their communication abilities for longer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Penn State study shows aphasia may not solely be a language disorder
(Penn State) Aphasia, a language disorder commonly diagnosed in stroke patients, may not be solely a language issue as traditionally believed, according to a Penn State study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Global aphasia without hemiparesis may be caused by blunt head trauma: an adolescent boy with transient aphasia - Şahin S, Türkdoğan D, Hacıfazlıoğlu NE, Yalçın EU, Eksen ZY, Ekinci G.
We report a 15-year old boy with transient global aphasia without hemiparesis due... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Aphasia Clinical Pearls / 10 Years of Teamwork / Massachusetts Hospitalist Opportunities (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Resident 360: Clinical … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - January 18, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

HSE researchers expand on neuroanatomical model of semantic aphasia
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) For the last 70 years, it was largely believed that spatial processing disorders, including those seen in language, occurred when the temporal-parietal-occipital junction of the brain's left hemisphere was damaged. But according to researchers from the HSE Neurolinguistics Laboratory, it is the damages to the axonal fibers connected to this area of the brain that are most important. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Primary progressive aphasia: Rare form of dementia stops sufferers SPEAKING
SYMPTOMS of dementia usually include confusion, memory loss and increasing difficulties with tasks and activities. But the disease comes in many forms and can affect different areas of the brain. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tau Imaging Among Breakthroughs Advancing the Fight against Alzheimer's
Worldwide,  nearly44 million  people now have Alzheimer's disease (AD) or related dementia, making these conditions the  top cause of disabilities in later life. The biopharma industry has invested billions of dollars into research to treat and prevent AD1, yet this work has faced many obstacles, including difficulty identifying biomarkers, tracking the disease ’s progress in the brain, and recruiting patients to trials while they are still asymptomatic. But in recent years, we’ve begun to see breakthroughs that is driving our research in new directions. Many of these accomplishments were hi...
Source: EyeForPharma - September 21, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Olga Uspenskaya-Cadoz Source Type: news

Unilateral Scleral Jaundice in an Elderly Man: An Odd Finding
Left scleral icterus is the only prominent physical finding in the 86-year-old who presented with transient aphasia, ataxia, and general asthenia. Can you dx? (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - September 8, 2016 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Ali Ahmadizadeh, MD Pharlin Noel, PA-C Source Type: news

What Its Like To Be A Caregiver
The following is a Q&A with Suzanne A., a Southern California-based caregiver. Suzanne is a caregiver to her husband Gil, who suffered multiple strokes and is now a paraplegic. With Gil unable to work, Suzanne works part-time to support them. Q: What do people not know about being a caregiver? Suzanne: Because of social media, our society has been introduced to many people who are caregivers that share their compassion and their struggles. However, each caregiver has a unique dynamic. They are either a caregiver for a spouse, a parent, a grandparent or a friend, and each caregiving situation is different. It also...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

July 2016
Safeguarding Our Health: Vaccines Protect Us All...A Blurry Worldview: Understanding Myopia...Physical Activity Linked to Reduced Cancer Risk...Understanding Aphasia...Featured Web Site: Test Your Sense of Pitch (Source: NIH News in Health)
Source: NIH News in Health - July 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

tDCS of the Motor Cortex in Post-Stroke AphasiatDCS of the Motor Cortex in Post-Stroke Aphasia
This study evaluated the impact of transcranial direct current stimulation on function and activity-related outcomes in chronic post-stroke aphasia. Brain (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Mediaplanet and Lingraphica Team up to Spread the Word about Aphasia
Mediaplanet today announces the latest issue of its in-demand “Stroke Awareness” campaign.(PRWeb May 27, 2016)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/05/prweb13447439.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 28, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Memory test offers clue to pathological diagnosis in primary progressive aphasia
Patients with primary progressive aphasia show selective vulnerabilities in effortless learning and delayed retrieval of verbal information if their syndrome is related to Alzheimer’s disease rather than frontotemporal lobar degeneration, research indicates. (Source: MedWire News)
Source: MedWire News - May 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer ' s disease Source Type: news

60 Minutes updates viewers on poliovirus therapy for glioblastoma
Treatment Terms Cancer Brain tumor Additional SEO Keywords brain tumor, glioblastoma, 60 minutes, brain cancer, poliovirus, polio virus SEO Meta Description CBS's 60 Minutes updates viewers on the polio virus therapy for brain tumor developed and tested at Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center. Author Sarah Avery Sub-Title FDA's breakthrough therapy designation expedites development Overview In a poignant, two-part segment May 15, 2016, CBS’s 60 Minutes returned to Duke to update viewers on the poliovirus therapy developed and t...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - May 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Aphasia During Flight, No Fasting Before Lipid Testing, Connecticut Oncologist/Hematologist Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Clinical Practice Center: … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 5, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Brain contusion with aphasia following an ice hockey injury - Degen RM, Fink ME, Callahan L, Fibel KH, Ramsay J, Kelly BT.
We present a case of ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Right Brain May Aid Speech Recovery After Left-Sided Stroke Right Brain May Aid Speech Recovery After Left-Sided Stroke
A new study shows right-brain structural integrity relates to speech recovery after left-sided stroke, raising the possibility of new therapies for post-stroke aphasia based on engaging the right side of the brain. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Right Brain Scan Could Aid in Stroke Recovery
It might help predict speech and language recovery in those who suffer stroke in brain's left side, researchers find Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Aphasia, Stroke, Stroke Rehabilitation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research Offers Clues to Dementia with Language Loss
In this rarer form of brain illness, protein plaques appear to clump more prominently in certain areas Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alzheimer's Disease, Aphasia, Dementia (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia plaques attack language center of brain
The recent ability to peer into the brain of living individuals with a rare type of language dementia, primary progressive aphasia, provides important insight into the beginning stages of this disease, when it is caused by a buildup of a toxic protein found in Alzheimer's disease. The research also offers insight into why this dementia causes people to lose the ability to express themselves and understand language. The findings will guide Alzheimer's treatment, say researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dementia plaques attack language center of brain
(Northwestern University) The recent ability to peer into the brain of living individuals with a rare type of language dementia, primary progressive aphasia, provides important insight into the beginning stages of this disease, when it is caused by a buildup of a toxic protein found in Alzheimer's disease. The research also offers insight into why this dementia causes people to lose the ability to express themselves and understand language. The findings will guide Alzheimer's treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The "Non-Practicing" Scientist and How She's Here to Help YOU
This article first appeared on Scientista. Visit The Scientista Foundation for more great content! About the Author Heather Burkhart is an energetic science writer and recent graduate from the linguistics program at the University of Utah where she developed an interest in studying aphasia and other language properties of the brain. She is currently Co-Managing Editor for The Scientista Foundation, and editor for its Scientista Spotlight section. When she is not writing in a cozy corner of her home, she is most likely exploring the beautiful outdoor landscape of Utah. Find more of Heather's writing here! -- This feed and i...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stroke patients' speech loss linked to loss of brain interconnections
(IOS Press) When brain regions that control speech and reading comprehension are destroyed due to blockage of blood flow, patients are often unable to speak or comprehend spoken or written language. These difficulties with language, or 'aphasia,' are a common symptom in the aftermath of stroke. However, in a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that damage to the underlying connections among different areas of the brain can also affect the severity of aphasia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Brain disorder often mistaken for Alzheimer's leaves sufferers 'verbally locked in'
Primary progressive aphasia robs sufferers of the ability to recall words, and is often mistaken for dementia where people cannot recall memories, experts at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Candid Conversation With Kim Campbell On The Rhinestone Cowboy, Alzheimer's And Living Life As A Caregiver
"I have a black eye, but I'm hanging in there." Kim Campbell, tells me. "Caregiving is hard," she says. "I don't know how people do it." Kim's husband, legendary country singer, Glen Campbell, rocked awareness when he and his family let the world know their secret. Together they toured the country after bravely announcing he had Alzheimer's diseaselen playing his heart out with his musically talented children: son, Shannon and daughter, Ashley, by his side. Napa Valley was their final stage, Glen's last encore. By that night, his struggle through the plaques and tangles plaguing his brain had...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dysphagia in Duchenne: practical recommendations to guide management
Dysphasia, or difficulty swallowing, effects many patients with Duchenne. Complaints of "something stuck in my throat" are not uncommon. A new article on dysphagia in Duchenne presents a clear step by step plan of care. (Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy)
Source: Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy - January 8, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

International Aphasia Awareness Month - October 2015
(Source: Speakability)
Source: Speakability - October 8, 2015 Category: Speech Therapy Source Type: news

SLAM dunk for aphasia: Explaining speech production
We take speech for granted. We can talk effortlessly all day, but the seeming ease of speech production is actually the result of some complex interactive processes that involve multiple representations in the brain. A recent model sheds light on the processes underlying aphasia, that is the condition when speech (at least partially) fails. (Source: Psychonomic Society News)
Source: Psychonomic Society News - September 15, 2015 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: news

Stroke Rounds: Aphasia Recovery Better When Therapy Spread Out
(MedPage Today) -- Distributing therapy hours over a longer time period boosts recovery (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - June 25, 2015 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Modified Berg Balance Scale: making assessment appropriate for people with aphasia - Carter A, Nicholas M, Hunsaker E, Jacobson AM.
OBJECTIVE: Modifying assessments for people with aphasia has the potential to increase the validity of healthcare assessments across professional domains. This pilot study addressed the challenges of giving people with aphasia the power to fully participat... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Why does Hodor only say Hodor? The Game of Thrones giant may have a neurological condition
Hodor may have a neurological disease called expressive aphasia, which causes language problems, Jordan Lewis, of the Penn State College of Medicine explains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Narrative discourse impairments in Persian-speaking persons with traumatic brain injury: a pilot study - Ghayoumi Anaraki Z, Marini A, Yadegari F, Mahmoodi Bakhtiari B, Fakharian E, Rahgozar M, Rassouli M.
OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown the presence of narrative discourse difficulties in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI), even in those who do not suffer from aphasia. Yet, there still exist inconsistencies between the results of different studies, in p... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Treatment of Poststroke AphasiaTreatment of Poststroke Aphasia
Aphasia can be a debilitating consequence of stroke. This review examines current approaches to post-stroke aphasia, and explores new modalities such as brain stimulation and other neuromodulators. Seminars in Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

6 People Who Spoke A Foreign Language After A Coma
You may have heard about the guy who woke up from a coma able to speak French. Experts call the condition "bilingual aphasia." It supposedly occurs when one area of the brain that learns a language is damaged while another remains untouched. BroBible.com has compiled six strange-but-true examples. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Out-of-character criminal actions linked to dementia
Conclusion This study looks at an important issue, but it had several limitations that make the results less reliable: It used data on criminal behaviour taken from patients’ medical notes rather than relying on official criminal records. Patients referred to the centre may have had more behavioural problems than those with dementia in the general population. The study cannot show the criminal behaviour was caused by dementia. The study had no control group, so cannot compare crime rates among healthy adults with those with dementia. Dementia can lead to changes in behaviour and, in some people, loss o...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Neurology Older people Source Type: news

Stroke: Neuro-rehabilitation helps patients cope with loss of motor function
The majority of patients who survive a stroke usually continue to suffer from permanent motor disorders (hemiparesis) or a linguistic handicap (aphasia). A new study reveals an improvement in the efficiency of the brain activity when patients receive a treatment combining motor revalidation with non-invasive brain stimulation. These results were demonstrated via the technique of functional MRI. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 9, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hemodynamic stroke caused by strangulation - Neto HS, Neville IS, Beer-Furlan A, Tavares WM, Teixeira MJ, Paiva WS.
We report a case of watershed ischemic stroke in a 36-year-old male secondary to manual strangulation. The patient presented with a right hemiparesis with grade IV motor deficit and an expressive aphasia. Radiological investigation revealed an ischemic str... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Stroke in a young patient? Ask about synthetic cannabinoids
3 out of 5 stars Ischemic stroke after use of synthetic marijuana “spice”. Freeman MJ et al. Neurology 2013;81:1-4. Abstract This interesting paper, from the University of South Florida in Tampa, describes a brother and sister who at different times both developed ischemic strokes shortly after smoking a synthetic marijuana product. The 26-year-old brother presented with dysarthria, expressive aphasia, and right-sided weakness after smoking “Spice” a few hours previously. Head CT showed a clot in the proximal middle cerebral artery. His symptoms resolved after treatment with thrombolytics. The ...
Source: The Poison Review - December 11, 2013 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical cerebral ischemia jwh-018 spice stroke synthetic cannabinoid Source Type: news

Does Acupuncture Improve Dysphasia in Head and Neck Cancer?Does Acupuncture Improve Dysphasia in Head and Neck Cancer?
A pilot study found that quality of life was better after acupuncture treatment, although the difference wasn't significant. The timing and duration might be to blame. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Using one language to relearn another: Aphasia and bilingualism
In the era of globalization, bilingualism is becoming more and more frequent, and it is considered a plus. However, can this skill turn into a disadvantage, when someone acquires aphasia? More precisely, if a bilingual person suffers brain damage (i.e. stroke, head trauma, dementia) and this results in a language impairment called aphasia, then the two languages can be disrupted, thus increasing the challenge of language rehabilitation. According to Dr... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Bilingualism helps aphasia sufferers relearn primary language
Researchers have found that when a person who speaks two languages experiences brain damage leading to a language condition called aphasia, the second, less dominant language can be used to transfer knowledge to the primary one, helping with rehabilitation. The National Aphasia Association defines aphasia as "an impairment of the ability to use or comprehend words, usually acquired as a result of a stroke or other brain injury." When a bilingual person acquires aphasia, the two languages can be disrupted, making language rehabilitation quite difficult... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Aphasia and bilingualism: Using one language to relearn another
(University of Montreal) A recent critical literature review conducted by Ana Inés Ansaldo and Ladan Ghazi Saidi -- Ph.D student -- points to three interventional avenues to promote cross-linguistic effects of language therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Famous Faces Give Insight to Primary Progressive AphasiaFamous Faces Give Insight to Primary Progressive Aphasia
A new clinical tool highlights brain differences related to impairment in naming vs recognizing famous faces in patients with PPA. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Could 'famous faces test' be used to spot dementia?
Conclusion This study provides some preliminary findings of use of the NUFFACE Test in people with primary progressive aphasia – a rare and specific form of early dementia. One of the main limitations of this study was that it was very small, including only 30 people with PPA. A small sample size decreases the reliability of the study findings; if another sample of people with PPA were examined, the results could be different. Another limitation is that it only included people with PPA who were relatively young and in the early stages of disease. Findings may not be applicable to other people in later stages or seve...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Older people Mental health Source Type: news