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Undocumented Woman Cleared For Liver Transplant After Oregon Hospital Rolls Back ‘Archaic’ Policy

An Oregon hospital has eliminated an “archaic” policy that would have barred an undocumented Portland resident from getting a lifesaving liver transplant. Silvia Lesama-Santos, a mother of four who is covered by her husband’s insurance and has lived in Portland for 30 years, was originally denied care at Oregon Health &Science University (OHSU) hospital because of her immigration status, the Oregonian reports. The Oregon chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) took up Lesama-Santos’ case, putting out a statement on Tuesday calling for the hospital to roll back any policy that limits access to organ transplants based on immigration status. “Everyone deserves to have access to life-saving medical care,” the statement reads. “It is inhumane and cruel to deny care to undocumented members of our community. This is an unfair practice that goes against our values as Oregonians.” OHSU responded almost immediately with a statement of its own, announcing the termination of the policy. “It was brought to our attention this evening that an archaic transplant policy was preventing an undocumented individual from being evaluated at OHSU,” the statement reads. “Upon learning of the policy, OHSU leaders acted immediately and terminated the policy. We deeply regret the pain this has caused the family.” Dr. Willscott Naugler, medical director for the liver transplant program at OHSU, told the Oregonian th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime oregon Source Type: news

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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Cyborgization Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers artificial intelligence comics digital digital health Healthcare Innovation marvel marvel universe superhero superpower technology Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we focused on two pathways of cardiomyocytes or heart cells: the Hippo pathway, which is involved in stopping renewal of adult cardiomyocytes, and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC) pathway, essential for cardiomyocyte normal functions." Previous work had hinted that components of the DGC pathway may somehow interact with members of the Hippo pathway. The researchers genetically engineered mice to lack genes involved in one or both pathways, and then determined the ability of the heart to repair an injury. These studies showed for the first time that dystroglycan 1, a component of the DGC ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: The Permanente journal - Category: Journals (General) Tags: Perm J Source Type: research
A California man named Kris Boesen was completely paralyzed after breaking his neck in a terrible car crash last March. But now he can brush his teeth and hug his family again… He's even started to regain sensation in his legs. And it's all because of a simple procedure he underwent about a month after his accident: stem cell therapy. During Kris' procedure, researchers at the University of Southern California injected 10 million stem cells into his spinal cord. Within two weeks, he could wiggle his fingers. Three months later, he was able to feed himself, write his name and operate his wheelchair. His r...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
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