“Karakousis’s Abdominoinguinal approach for the treatment of a primary retroperitoneal parasitic leiomyoma with inguinal extension. A case report”

Conclusions PRPL is a rare extrauterine entity probably derived from remnant embryogenic cells. The absence of clinical guidelines recommend an individualized treatment of these patients. Karakousis’s abdominoinguinal approach should be present in any surgeon's armamentarium as the resectability-rate of tumors of the lower quadrant of the abdomen increases up to 95%.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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ConclusionsPRPL is a rare extrauterine entity probably derived from remnant embryogenic cells. The absence of clinical guidelines recommend an individualized treatment of these patients. Karakousis’s abdominoinguinal approach should be present in any surgeon’s armamentarium as the resectability-rate of tumors of the lower quadrant of the abdomen increases up to 95%.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusions PRPL is a rare extrauterine entity probably derived from remnant embryogenic cells. The absence of clinical guidelines recommend an individualized treatment of these patients. Karakousis’s abdominoinguinal approach should be present in any surgeon’s armamentarium as the resectability-rate of tumors of the lower quadrant of the abdomen increases up to 95%.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusion Especially in endemic area for this parasite, one of differential diagnoses of pelvic cyst must be echinococcosis.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Patient is a 48-year old with history of total hysterectomy secondary to symptomatic leiomyomas. She was referred to our clinic with groin and right leg pain. She also had burning sensation on the medial aspect of the inner thigh. Pelvic MRI was obtained to further evaluate the etiology of her complaints which revealed a 3.3  cm mass in the obturator fossa. She was taken to the OR for robotic resection of the mass. Once retro-peritoneum was explored and obturator fossa was accessed, the mass was visualized compressing on the obturator nerve.
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Study Objective: To identify patient and procedure characteristics of women undergoing surgical excision of parasitic leiomyomas.
Source: The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion Parasitic leiomyoma is an extremely rare subtype of uterine leiomyoma, presents with vague symptoms, diagnosed by ultrasound and managed by complete resection. Previous uterine procedures have been implicated in its etiology.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In conclusion, recommendations for the current practice of laparoscopic myomectomy and morcellation are reviewed.
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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Source: Gynecological Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Taking into account the current literature in the scope of this study, we suggest that the factors involved in development of parasitic myomas can be classified as confirmed and doubtful contributions. PMID: 28732545 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
The cause of contamination and dissemination of leiomyoma tissue particles and cells in the peritoneal cavity during myomectomy is a challenging issue for both clinicians and researchers. Therefore, the articl...
Source: Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
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