A Heart Risk Factor Even Doctors Know Little About

Up to one in five Americans have high levels of lipoprotein(a) in their blood, putting them at risk of heart attacks and strokes.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Tests (Medical) Heart Cholesterol Exercise Weight Stroke Lipoproteins Diet and Nutrition Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Niacin Doctors Source Type: news

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When people say "cardiovascular disease" in the context of blood cholesterol, they mean atherosclerosis. This is the name given to the build up of fatty deposits that narrow and weaken blood vessels, leading to heart failure and ultimately some form of disabling or fatal rupture - a stroke or heart attack. The primary approach to treatment is the use of lifestyle choices and drugs such as statins to lower cholesterol carried by LDL particles in the blood. Unfortunately, the evidence strongly suggests that this is the wrong approach, in that the benefits are small and unreliable. Atherosclerosis does occur ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Stacy Pigott A $2.8 million grant may help develop an improved therapeutic treatment for acute ischemic stroke patients to let them recover faster with fewer long-term complications. The protocol hinges on effectively delivering statins to the brain, where their neuroprotective properties can help save tissue damaged by stroke. Aug. 7, 2020 University of Arizona Health Sciencesnhg-PATRICK-RONALDSON_DSC6492-web.jpg Patrick Ronaldson (right), associate professor in the College of Medicine – Tucson's Department of Pharmacology, and doctoral students Erica Williams and Robert Betterton discuss their latest res...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading global cause of death [1]. High adiposity, hypertension, high cholesterol, and hyperglycemia are their most important risk factors. Between 1980 and 2010, the mortality burden of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRF) shifted from high-income to low and middle-income countries [2]. In Latin America, coronary heart disease and stroke cause 42.5% and 28.8% of the CVD mortality, respectively [3]. But, it is necessary to identify the magnitude of the CMRF not only in each region but in each country.
Source: Primary Care Diabetes - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Original research Source Type: research
AbstractCerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common finding on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We previously demonstrated that high blood pressure (BP) and low carotid flow velocity were associated with cerebrovascular disease. However, their associations with brain volume and CSVD remain to be determined. A total of 721 adults ( ≥ 50 years) from the community-based I-Lan Longitudinal Aging Study were included. Flow velocities at the common (CCA) and internal carotid artery (ICA), including peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end-diastolic velocity (EDV), were measured with Doppler ultrasound. We f...
Source: Translational Stroke Research - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study is trying to explore the association betwee...
Source: Lipids in Health and Disease - Category: Lipidology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions It is suggested we should take sufficient care of postmenopausal females with depression and control blood pressure and glucose more effectively. Abbreviations HP: Hypertension; DM: Diabetes; TC: Cholesterol; TG: Triglyceride; BMI: Body-Mass Index; CES-D: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression; CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; HR: Hazard Ratio; CI: Confidence Interval; ADL: Activities of daily living scale. PMID: 32715792 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical and Experimental Hypertension - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Clin Exp Hypertens Source Type: research
The objective of this article is to investigate the differences of carotid atherosclerosis patients with or without OSAHS by a cross-sectional research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with carotid atherosclerosis by ultrasonography were recruited. They were requested to fill the primary screening OSAHS questionnaire. Patients with high tendency of OSAHS underwent polysomnography (PSG) tests into OSAHS group, and patients without OSAHS were into non-OSAHS group. Blood tests and medical history were collected. Carotid atherosclerosis severity was analyzed by carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), c...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
The objective of this article is to investigate the differences of carotid atherosclerosis patients with or without OSAHS by a cross-sectional research.Materials and methodsPatients diagnosed with carotid atherosclerosis by ultrasonography were recruited. They were requested to fill the primary screening OSAHS questionnaire. Patients with high tendency of  OSAHS underwent polysomnography (PSG) tests into OSAHS group, and patients without OSAHS were into non-OSAHS group. Blood tests and medical history were collected. Carotid atherosclerosis severity was analyzed by carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid ...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Have you ever spent the day in a city with such bad air pollution that when you blew your nose the mucus had a black tinge? Have you ever coughed as you breathed in diesel fumes from a passing bus and thought to yourself, “Well, that’s a year gone from my life”? Could it actually be true — that air pollution leads to an early death? The answer, in fact, is an unqualified yes. Air pollution causes heart disease, lung disease, and early death It has been known for some time that air pollution causes lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, asthma, heart disease, and stroke. One r...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Environmental health Healthy Aging Memory Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs
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