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Artificial lung dev Breethe raises $3m

Artificial lung developer Breethe raised approximately $3 million in an equity financing round, according to an SEC filing posted late last month. Funds raised during the round will cover the sales and issuance of Series Seed-4 preferred stock and the underlying common stock convertible from it, according to the filing. The Baltimore-based company is developing the Oxy-1 ambulatory artificial lung system which is designed for home use for patients who suffer from acute and chronic lung failure, according to its website. The system includes a portable pack, which contains the unit’s batteries, oxygen source and pump motor and controller, a pump-lung unit which it anticipates will need to be replaced every 30 days and a blood cannula connection to the heart. Breethe was formed in 2014 as a spin-out from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, utilizing licensed technology from the University. A total of 22 anonymous investors joined the $3 million round, according to the filing, with the first sale date recorded on December 13. The company is not looking to raise any more funds in the round and hasn’t officially announced the round outside the SEC filing. The post Artificial lung dev Breethe raises $3m appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory breethe Source Type: news

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Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
The use of durable continuous-flow mechanical assist devices provides selected heart failure patients with both symptomatic and functional benefits; however, they are not without potential complications. Infection, thrombosis, stroke and GI bleeding are amongst the most commonly reported problems of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy.1 –3 In addition, LVAD peripherals can be bulky and heavy for the patient to carry, causing joint stress, discomfort and reduced quality of life. Device miniaturization is one design trend that has enabled device implantation in patients with a broader range of body sizes, and...
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) results from persistent pulmonary vascular obstructions, presumably due to inflammatory thrombosis. Because estimates of thrombus volume at diagnosis have no predictive value, we investigated the role of the thrombosis marker D-dimer and the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP) for predicting outcomes in CTEPH.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Pediatric Health Associates - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Volunteer Opportunities Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Epidemiology of Skin Diseases Source Type: research
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Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
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