Remembering the “me” in merry: Self-care strategies for this holiday season

The holiday season is filled with hustle and bustle. There’s plenty of excitement from seeing family and friends, but also stress, travel, long lines, planning, preparation — and a range of emotions from positive to negative. For many, the holiday season means planning and taking care of others. However, this leaves little time for taking care of oneself. Below are a few ideas on how to practice self-care during this holiday season. Regularly schedule time to engage in self-care activities. Schedule self-care activities (exercise, meditation, a hobby you enjoy) at the same time each day so they become routine, or set a timer or alarm to remind yourself. Practice gratitude for the people and events in your life. This might include writing in a journal about what you appreciate in your life, or letting others know the gratitude you feel. Engage in deep breathing or other relaxation skills. This can include listening to soothing music or engaging in an imagery exercise. You can also engage in a number of other relaxation skills. Tune into the emotions you are experiencing. Emotions may be positive, negative, or a combination of the two. Call “time outs” for yourself and check in on your feelings. Write down your feelings in a journal. Try to understand why you might be experiencing negative emotions. For some people, negative emotions might be related to unrealistic expectations or goals of themselves around the holidays, or from feeling overwhelmed....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Mind body medicine Stress Source Type: blogs

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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress coronavirus COVID-19 work from home Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
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Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Interview Podcast Psychiatry The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
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Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Neurology Psychiatry Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs
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Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized apollo1150 Space Source Type: news
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