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Ischemic lesions and superficial siderosis in CAA: Partners in crime or innocent bystanders?

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), first described in 1927 as a congophilic angiopathy associated with amyloid plaque in brains of patients with Alzheimer dementia,1 has an association with large and small intracranial hemorrhages (ICH). The differential diagnosis of ICH therefore includes CAA, especially in older patients or those without hypertension. The widely used Boston Criteria for diagnosis of CAA in vivo rely on the hemorrhagic characteristics of the disease.2 The pathophysiology of ICH in CAA remains uncertain. Thus, its prognosis, risk stratification, and clinical management present a challenge. Additional imaging features of CAA have contributed potential new perspectives on pathophysiology. The report of ischemic lesions in CAA may represent a novel concept for most clinicians accustomed to thinking about CAA as a hemorrhagic disease. The observation that Alzheimer dementia brains with severe amyloid angiopathy had more prevalent infarcts3–5 prompted subsequent investigations suggesting that amyloid deposition in small and medium-sized cortical vessels may play an active role in ischemia through pathologic thickening of the vessel wall, producing reduction or obliteration of the vessel lumen.6,7 Cortical superficial siderosis (cSS), easy to detect with modern MRI, is a striking and common feature of CAA. How these additional imaging features fit into a larger model of CAA remains unclear. Are they an epiphenomenon or can they teach us about the disease? In ...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: EDITORIALS Source Type: research

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More American's--especially the baby boom generation--are learning the importance of eating healthy.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomA new research study indicates that eating Mediterranean-style seems to reduces the risk of mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's.There are numerous studies that indicate this style of eating helps reduce cardiovascular risk factors like high cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes.All of these are linked to Alzheimer's and I have written about them previously on this blog (use the search box for more information).Dementia Care TipsThe Mediterranean diet is a heart-healthy ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's care alzheimer's risk alzheimers dementia care diet eating health help with dementia care lifestyle Mediterranean Diet Source Type: blogs
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — If you’re a fan of the “fat-burning” keto diet, you’ll be fired up about its ranking in the 2018 list of best diets from US News and World Report: It’s tied for last, along with the relatively unknown Dukan diet. Both stress eating a ton of protein and minimal carbs, putting the dieter into “ketosis,” when the body breaks down both ingested and stored body fat into ketones, which it uses as energy. People on such diets often deal with fatigue and light-headedness as they adjust to a lack of carbohydrates. Though the experts on the US News and Wo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Weight Loss Source Type: news
Purpose of review The current article reviews recently published evidence of the important role that specific dietary patterns may hold on preventing cognitive impairment and dementia over aging. Recent findings Specific dietary patterns attributed to targeting cardiovascular risk factors may protect against the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease. Numerous epidemiological studies have strongly suggested that multinutrient approaches using the Mediterranean diet (Med diet), dietary approach to systolic hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean-DASH diet intervent...
Source: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - Category: Nutrition Tags: AGEING: BIOLOGY AND NUTRITION: Edited by Jürgen M. Bauer and John E. Morley Source Type: research
Adult children are right to be aware of their parents’ physical and mental changes since there’s no way to stop the aging process. However, as a columnist on caregiving and a forum moderator, I’m seeing something very scary happening far too often. Ageism is overtaking common sense and respect. The fact that someone is over 65, and perhaps has arthritis and controlled high blood pressure, does not make this person cognitively unstable. Dementia doesn’t necessarily step in even after – gasp! – age 70. Read full article on HealthCentral about aging and the differences in people - not ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
By SHANNON HALLOWAY &MELISSA KALENSKY A patient walked into clinic wearing only a hospital gown, feet bare and EKG wires trailing. Just hours after having surgery, his dementia had prompted him to wander out of the hospital and walk two miles to proudly show off his new surgical scar to a familiar face. Physically unharmed, his heart was easy to fix but his memory was beyond repair. Though the road to a cure has long seemed insurmountable, dementia advocates have recently found reason to celebrate. Scientists announced this week the development of a new tool that may help identify people who are prone to Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Dementia prevention Source Type: blogs
In this study, we used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) to estimate clinically measured SBP and DBP trajectories for 20 years prior to death, for individuals dying at 60 years and older. Second, we compared the linear SBP trends for years 10 to 3 years before death in patients who died and age- and sex-matched controls who survived at least 9 years. These approaches aimed to separate age from end-of-life associations, and avoid healthy survivor biases. Twenty years before death, estimated mean SBPs increased with increasing age at death (60-69 years, 139.5 mm Hg; ≥90 years, 150.0 mm Hg). All age-at-...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Elderly apolipoprotein E‑/‑ mice with advanced atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta do not develop Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies. Mol Med Rep. 2017 Nov 21;: Authors: Shnerb Ganor R, Harats D, Schiby G, Rosenblatt K, Lubitz I, Shaish A, Salomon O Abstract Atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. These diseases share common risk factors, which are exhibited in old age, including hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and apolipoprotein (Apo) ε4 allele. We previously demonstrated that factor XI (FXI) deficiency...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
In this study, we integrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular approaches to determine whether increased stiffness of aortic VSMCs in hypertensive rats is ROCK-dependent, and whether the anti-hypertensive effect of ROCK inhibitors contributes to the reduction of aortic stiffness via changing VSMC mechanical properties. Despite a widely held belief that aortic stiffening is associated with changes in extracellular matrix proteins and endothelial dysfunction, our recent studies demonstrated that intrinsic stiffening of aortic VSMCs, independent of VSMC proliferation and migration, is an important contributo...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review The current article reviews recently published evidence of the important role that specific dietary patterns may hold on preventing cognitive impairment and dementia over aging. Recent findings Specific dietary patterns attributed to targeting cardiovascular risk factors may protect against the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease. Numerous epidemiological studies have strongly suggested that multinutrient approaches using the Mediterranean diet (Med diet), dietary approach to systolic hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean-DASH diet intervent...
Source: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - Category: Nutrition Tags: AGEING: BIOLOGY AND NUTRITION: Edited by Jürgen M. Bauer and John E. Morley Source Type: research
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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