Cationic nanoemulsions as nucleic acids delivery systems

Publication date: 20 December 2017 Source:International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Volume 534, Issues 1–2 Author(s): Helder Ferreira Teixeira, Fernanda Bruxel, Michelle Fraga, Roselena Silvestri Schuh, Giovanni Konat Zorzi, Ursula Matte, Elias Fattal Since the first clinical studies, knowledge in the field of gene therapy has advanced significantly, and these advances led to the development and subsequent approval of the first gene medicines. Although viral vectors-based products offer efficient gene expression, problems related to their safety and immune response have limited their clinical use. Thus, design and optimization of nonviral vectors is presented as a promising strategy in this scenario. Nonviral systems are nanotechnology-based products composed of polymers or lipids, which are usually biodegradable and biocompatible. Cationic liposomes are the most studied nonviral carriers and knowledge about these systems has greatly evolved, especially in understanding the role of phospholipids and cationic lipids. However, the search for efficient delivery systems aiming at gene therapy remains a challenge. In this context, cationic nanoemulsions have proved to be an interesting approach, as their ability to protect and efficiently deliver nucleic acids for diverse therapeutic applications has been demonstrated. This review focused on cationic nanoemulsions designed for gene therapy, providing an overview on their composition, physicochemical properties, and their effi...
Source: International Journal of Pharmaceutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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Source: NIH Calendar of Events - Category: American Health Source Type: events
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
An experimental gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) developed by Swiss drugmaker Novartis AG would be worth a price of $310,000 to $900,000, according to an independent U.S. nonprofit organization that reviews the value of drugs and medical treatments.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
An experimental gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) developed by Swiss drugmaker Novartis AG would offer value at a price of $310,000 to $900,000, according an independent U.S. nonprofit organization that reviews the value of drugs and medical treatments.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
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Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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