4 tips for teaching your child how to ride a bike “on the road”

I’ve been a parent for six years, and I still feel like I’ve always just missed some two-week window that would easily set up my oldest for the rest of his life. First it was swimming, then play dates, then soccer. The latest was riding a bike. In August, Milo was past 5 and a half years old and ripping his Big Wheel through the neighborhood. He loved it, but I feared that I had blown the chance to teach him to ride a two-wheeler before kindergarten started. So, me being me, I scrambled and tried to undo time. I bought him a used BMX bike and removed the pedals. He went up and down our sidewalk; the cracks and roots made that two weeks of uselessness. He kept at it, but I didn’t see balance clicking in. However, on a Thursday afternoon while we were walking on our just-repaved road, Milo picked up his feet and started rolling. By Saturday, when he was pedaling without pedals, I realized it was time to reattach the real things. Before I could finish, “Just remember that you have to…,” he said, “I got this.” And he did and he hasn’t stopped. I’d love to take credit. The most I can claim is that I went outside with him. But I knew one thing quickly: the playground basketball court wasn’t going to contain him for long. I also know that kids can’t ever be 100% prepped — that’s the point of learning — but streets are different than soccer and even kindergarten. They come with cars, distracted...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

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On a cool winter’s day in early 2014, the American academic Nafees Hamid was invited for tea at the second-story at the Barcelona apartment of a young Moroccan man. It started well enough; they sat down at the kitchen table, chatting amiably in French while two acquaintances of the host sat nearby in the living room. Halfway through the conversation, though, things took a turn. “He started saying things like, ‘Why should we trust any Westerner?’” Hamid recalls. “‘Why would we not kill every one of them? Why should I even trust you—you are an American—sitting here? Why s...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized extremism feature Londontime Source Type: news
Mental health flows from the ceramic jug psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb keeps on her desk. There’s nothing special about the jug—a minor accessory in an office designed with the sort of tidy impersonality common to her field. And there’s no special elixir in it—just water. But all the same, the jug provides a certain kind of healing. When patients are struggling, crying, overcome in some way, Gottlieb, a Los Angeles based practitioner and author of the book Maybe You Should Talk to someone, will offer up a cup of water, pour it for them and hand it across. In that small gesture is a whole constellati...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Ultrasound biomicroscopy allows a reasonable clinicalsonographic suspicion of ACE. An initial conservative management is proposed as a safer option for stable, mildly symptomatic patients, avoiding aggressive sight threatening treatments. PMID: 32830591 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Eur J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
At the dawn of the pandemic, as businesses shuttered and frontline workers braved inadequate conditions and the death toll began to tick frighteningly upward, I was home alone, nursing one selfish obsession: that I would use this time to get in really good shape. I am not proud of this–I would much rather write that I was raising money for communities disproportionately affected by this crisis, or delivering meals to the immunocompromised–but it’s the truth. The more I thought about it, the more the idea sharpened in my mind’s eye: this persistent fantasy of how I would emerge anew once the lockdown...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Considering that the healthcare industry is expected to exceed  $11 trillion by 2022, it might not come as a surprise that big tech companies like Google, Apple, Facebook or even Uber want a share of this cake. Even if their business is flourishing elsewhere, these companies stand more to gain than green bills. More importantly, investing in healthcare is an adequate way to build user trust. Our latest e-book analyzing those endeavours and more is available here. Tech Giants in Healthcare This comprehensive guide, Tech Giants in Healthcare, clarifies how and wh...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Security & Privacy AI amazon apple artificial intelligence genetics genomics google Health Healthcare IBM ibm watson research smartphone technology microsoft market Source Type: blogs
This study adds valuable knowledge on motor cognition and mental imagery processes in the blind.
Source: Brain Imaging and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA, MD Clever Hans Preetham Srinivas, the head of the chest radiograph project in Qure.ai, summoned Bhargava Reddy, Manoj Tadepalli, and Tarun Raj to the meeting room. “Get ready for an all-nighter, boys,” said Preetham. Qure’s scientists began investigating the algorithm’s mysteriously high performance on chest radiographs from a new hospital. To recap, the algorithm had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 1 – that’s 100 % on multiple-choice question test. “Someone leaked the paper to AI,” laughed Manoj. “I...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Health Technology @roguerad AI Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs
Short-eared Owl at Burwell Fen, photographed mid-January One evening in late November, I was once again, hoping to catch sight of the Starling murmurations that occur over the Broad Lane balancing pond. As mentioned in a previous, issue the local Starlings and their continental counterparts will often roost in the reed bed there, last winter there were literally thousands. At the time of writing, just a few hundred are roosting, but that can change on a wind as arrivals from Europe turn up when the weather changes. Anyway, reader Alison waved as she passed the pond on her dog walk. I later heard that she’d seen a scu...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Birds Source Type: blogs
Ankush K Desai, Ugam P S Usgaonkar, Vivek S Naik, Madan Deshpande, Rajan ShuklaIndian Journal of Ophthalmology 2020 68(13):88-91 Diabetes mellitus continues to increase in epidemic proportions globally as well as in India. Poor glycemic control in long-standing diabetes mellitus eventually leads to chronic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Diabetic retinopathy is emerging as an important cause of avoidable visual impairment and blindness in India across all strata of society. Much of this vision loss can be prevented by improving control of known risk factors, annual f...
Source: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
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