HRT will not shorten lives, women told after new research published

Follow-up to alarming reports issued at turn of century says women on therapy do not die sooner than those on placebosWomen will be able to take hormone replacement pills without worrying that the therapy will shorten their lifespans, according to the longest follow-up yet of research that raised fears about the risks of a once-popular treatment.That earlier research was stopped early when unexpected harm was found to be caused by the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) – oestrogen alone or in combination with progestin, a synthetic hormone.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Menopause Medical research Health Cancer & wellbeing Society Science World news Source Type: news

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Conclusions World population is aging and the increase in life expectancy is often unhealthy. In particular, musculoskeletal aging, which leads to sarcopenia and osteoporosis, has several causes such as changes in body composition, inflammation, and hormonal imbalance. Sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and more frequently, sarcopenic obesity are commonly associated with aging and frequently closely linked each other, often leading to the development of a frailty syndrome. Frailty syndrome favors an increased risk of loss function in daily activities, for cardiovascular diseases, cancers, falls, and mortality. As the number of eld...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Avoidable risk factors contribute to the lead body burden among adults, which could therefore be lowered through targeted public health measures.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms. However, its use is controversial owing to potential health risks, such as thromboembolism and cancer. Bioidentical hormone therapy has recently become popular as an alternative to conventional hormone replacement therapy. These bioidentical hormones have a molecular structure identical to endogenous hormones found in a woman's body. A claimed advantage of bioidentical hormone therapy is the compounding practice in order to individualize therapy depending on patient's own hormone levels and symptoms. However, there is no scientif...
Source: Dermatology Online Journal - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Abstract Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations, are recommended risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) prior to menopause. Surgical menopause has significant impact on patients' health and well-being. Subsequently, concerns about surgical menopause influence uptake of RRSO in high risk women. The role of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in BRCA mutation carriers undergoing RRSO has been controversial. In the general population, premature surgical menopause is associated with worse quality of life and cognitive function, and increased risk of bone and cardiovascular disease; HRT continued until t...
Source: Gynecologic Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Gynecol Oncol Source Type: research
(CNN) — UK scientists have developed an online calculator that could enable doctors to more accurately predict a patient’s chance of developing breast cancer. If rolled out, the new tool could change the way in which the condition is treated. Among other things, details of family history, genetics, weight, alcohol consumption, age at menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy will all be considered by doctors when assessing a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer — the most common form of cancer in the UK. Each of these factors has “a small impact on the likelihood of developing the d...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Breast Cancer CNN Local TV Source Type: news
Abstract Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms. However, its use is controversial owing to potential health risks, such as thromboembolism and cancer. Bioidentical hormone therapy has recently become popular as an alternative to conventional hormone replacement therapy. These bioidentical hormones have a molecular structure identical to endogenous hormones found in a woman's body. A claimed advantage of bioidentical hormone therapy is the compounding practice in order to individualize therapy depending on patient's own hormone levels and symptoms. However, th...
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
Abstract Rapid advance in oncology leads to increasing survival of oncologic patients. More and more of them live long enough to reach either the natural age of menopause or, as a side effect of their oncotherapy, experience the cessation of gonadal function, leading to premature ovarian insufficiency, with disturbing vasomotor symtoms and long-term negative cardiovascular and skeletal effects. Thus, an ever increasing number of cancer survivors search endocrinologic help in the form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The misinterpretation of the WHI (Women's Health Initiative) Study has lead to an irrational f...
Source: Pathology Oncology Research - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Pathol Oncol Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: Consistent with previous literature, our analysis found that type 2 cancer is more common in non-white, older, and less obese patients and associated with higher mortality and recurrence. However, inconsistent with previous literature, we found no association between type 2 cancer and diabetes mellitus or use of HRT. These factors should be considered when approaching patients with endometrial cancer.Gynecol Obstet Invest
Source: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis analysis shows an association between HRT and the distribution of molecular subtypes of BC. However, no associations between other factors (e.g., age at diagnosis, body mass index, smoking status, age at menopause, number of deliveries, age at first delivery, breastfeeding history, or family history) were noted.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Swedish gynecologic oncologists have a more favorable attitude towards HRT for endometrial/ovarian cancer patients and feel more comfortable treating their patients than do gynecologists. This study illustrates a need for education in these matters in order not to withhold HRT from women due to doctors' sometimes unjustified anxiety. PMID: 30526173 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Ups J Med Sci Source Type: research
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