Parkinson's: Stem cells restore nerve function in monkeys

Scientists have created dopaminergic neurons from human stem cells and implanted them in monkeys with Parkinson's, restoring their nerve function.
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

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In this study, we generated DA neurons from PARK2 patient-specific, isogenic PARK2 null and PARK6 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells and found that these neurons exhibited more apoptosis and greater susceptibility to rotenone-induced mitochondrial stress. From phenotypic screening with an FDA-approved drug library, one voltage-gated calcium channel antagonist, benidipine, was found to suppress rotenone-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated the dysregulation of calcium homeostasis and increased susceptibility to rotenone-induced stress in PD, which is prevented by T-type calcium channel knockdown or a...
Source: Stem Cell Reports - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Contributors : Markus Schulze ; Markus J Riemenschneider ; Winkler J ürgen ; Winner BeateSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensHigh throughput sequencing of small RNAs (mature miRNA and piRNA/piRNA-like molecules) from control- and sporadic Parkinson ´s disease patient derived fibroblasts (n=15), induced pluripotent stem cells (n=26) and differentiated midbrain neurons (n=10). In parallel, cingulate gyrus samples from eight control- and eight Parkinson´s disease patients obtained from the Netherlands Brain Bank were sequenced. We found signifi cant diffe...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Contributors : Markus Schulze ; Markus J Riemenschneider ; Winkler J ürgen ; Winner BeateSeries Type : Methylation profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensHigh throughput sequencing of MSPI digested, size selected and bisulfite converted genomic DNA from control- and sporadic Parkinson ´s disease patient derived fibroblasts (n=15), induced pluripotent stem cells (n=26) and differentiated midbrain neurons (n=10). We were able to sequence more than 400,000 CpGs at ≥5x coverage in all samples. Nonetheless, statistical analysis with RnBeads did not identify major differences on sin gle CpG o...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Methylation profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Contributors : Markus Schulze ; Markus J Riemenschneider ; Winkler J ürgen ; Winner BeateSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensHigh throughput sequencing of poly-A RNA from control- and sporadic Parkinson ´s disease patient derived fibroblasts (n=15), induced pluripotent stem cells (n=31) and differentiated midbrain neurons (n=15). Fibroblasts and iPSCs do not show major differences on single gene level. In contrast, midbrain neurons derived from Parkinson´s disease patients show changes known to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
This article, unfortunately paywalled, is interesting to note as a mark of the now increasingly energetic expansion of commercial efforts in longevity science. David Sinclair has been building a private equity company to work in many areas relevant to this present generation of commercial longevity science; while I'm not sold on his primary research interests as the basis for meaningful treatments for aging, he is diversifying considerably here, including into senolytics, the clearance of senescent cells demonstrated to produce rejuvenation in animal studies. This sort of approach to business mixes aspects of investing and...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: A detailed knowledge of the pathological mechanism underlying the disorders is needed, and disease-modifying therapies are required to offer better therapeutic options to physician and caregivers of APS patients. PMID: 30294976 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: CNS Neurosci Ther Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2018Source: PM&R, Volume 10, Issue 9, Supplement 2Author(s): Thomas K. WatanabeAbstractCell-based therapies have been the subject of much discussion regarding their potential role in enhancing central nervous system function for a number of pathologic conditions. Much of the current research has been in preclinical trials, with clinical trials in the phase I or I/II stage. Nevertheless, there is considerable interest in the public about the potential regenerative role that stem cells may have in improving function for these neurologic conditions. This review will describe the different types of ...
Source: PMandR - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2018Source: Stem Cell ResearchAuthor(s): Zongbo Zhao, Sunping Ji, Zhige Shi, Hui LiuAbstractPeripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from a 70-year old Parkinson Disease patient. The PBMCs were reprogrammed with the human OKSM transcription factors using the non-integrating episomal vector system. The transgene-free iPSC showed pluripotency verified by immunocytochemistry for pluripotency markers and differentiated directly toward the 3 germ layers in vitro. Furthermore, the iPSC line showed normal karyotype.
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewParkinson ’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder affecting older individuals. The specific cause underlying dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss in the substantia nigra, a pathological hallmark of PD, remains elusive. Here, we highlight peer-reviewed reports using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model PD in vitro and discuss the potential disease-relevant phenotypes that may lead to a better understanding of PD etiology. Benefits of iPSCs are that they retain the genetic background of the donor individual and can be differentiated into specialized neurons to f...
Source: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Condition:   Parkinson Disease Intervention:   Biological: Injection of Umbilical cord derived MSCs Sponsor:   University of Jordan Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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