Parkinson's: Stem cells restore nerve function in monkeys

Scientists have created dopaminergic neurons from human stem cells and implanted them in monkeys with Parkinson's, restoring their nerve function.
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

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Stem Cells and Development, Ahead of Print.
Source: Stem Cells and Development - Category: Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 14 June 2018 Source:Stem Cell Reports Author(s): Yu-Kai Wang, Wan-Wan Zhu, Meng-Hua Wu, Yi-Hui Wu, Zheng-Xin Liu, Ling-Min Liang, Chao Sheng, Jie Hao, Liu Wang, Wei Li, Qi Zhou, Bao-Yang Hu Clinical application of stem cell derivatives requires clinical-grade cells and sufficient preclinical proof of safety and efficacy, preferably in primates. We previously successfully established a clinical-grade human parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (hPESC) line, but the suitability of its subtype-specific progenies for therapy is not clear. Here, we compared the function of clinical-grade hPESC-...
Source: Stem Cell Reports - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Parkinson's disease is strongly linked to quality control of mitochondria in neurons. The condition is characterized by the loss of a vital population neurons responsible for generating the neurotransmitter dopamine, and it is this loss that produces the tremors and other motor dysfunction observed in patients. Parkinson's disease is also a proteopathy, however, in which α-synuclein clumps together to form solid deposits that harm brain cells. In the research noted here, scientists show that this α-synuclein aggregation kills neurons by damaging mitochondria and triggering mitochondrial mechanisms that produce ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 9 June 2018 Source:Stem Cell Research Author(s): Seo-Young Lee, SangKyun Jeong, Janghwan Kim, Sun-Ku Chung Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. PD can result from a mutation of alpha-synuclein (α-SNCA), such as α-SNCA A53T. Using episomal vectors, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from skin fibroblasts with the α-SNCA A53T mutation. A huge bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) harboring the normal α-SNCA gene successfully corrected the α-SNCA A53T-mutant iPSCs. Melting curve analysis f...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Condition:   Parkinson's Disease Intervention:   Biological: mesenchymal stem cells Sponsor:   Hebei Newtherapy BIo-Pharma technology Co., Ltd. Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We report that increasing NAD+ via the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) significantly ameliorates mitochondrial function in patient neurons. Human neurons require nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) to maintain the NAD+ pool and utilize NRK1 to synthesize NAD+ from NAD+ precursors. Remarkably, NR prevents the age-related dopaminergic neuronal loss and motor decline in fly models of GBA-PD. Our findings suggest NR as a viable clinical avenue for neuroprotection in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Graphical abstract Teaser Mitochondrial damage is a key feature in Parkinson’s disease. Sch&oum...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
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