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Brain responds differently to food rewards in bulimia nervosa

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in how the brain responds to food rewards in individuals with a history of bulimia nervosa (BN), an eating disorder characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating followed by efforts of purging to avoid weight gain. The findings further define specific brain mechanisms involved in eating disorders and could help lead to new treatment therapies.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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, Gutierrez-Maldonado J Abstract Eating behavior style (emotional, restrictive, or external) has been proposed as an explanation for the differences in response to food-related cues between people who overeat and those who do not, and has been also considered a target for the treatment of eating disorders (EDs) characterized by lack of control over eating and weight-related (overweight/obesity) conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between eating behavior style and psychophysiological responses (self-reported food craving and anxiety) to food-related virtual reality (VR) environments in...
Source: Appetite - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Appetite Source Type: research
Individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) engage in episodes of binge eating, marked by loss of control and eating despite fullness. Does altered reward and metabolic state contribute to BN pathophysiology? Normally, hunger increases (and satiety decreases) reward salience to regulate eating. We investigated whether BN is associated with an abnormal response in a neural circuit involved in translating taste signals into motivated behavior, when hungry and fed. Twenty-six women remitted from BN (RBN) and 22 control women (CW) were administered water and sucrose during 2 counterbalanced fMRI visits, following a 16-hr fast or a s...
Source: Journal of Abnormal Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
The impact of acute stress on the neural processing of food cues in bulimia nervosa (BN) is unknown, despite theory that acute stress decreases cognitive control over food and hence increases vulnerability to environmental triggers for binge eating. Thus, the goals of this manuscript were to explore the impact of acute stress on the neural processing of food cues in BN. In Study 1, 10 women with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM –5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) BN and 10 healthy controls participated in an fMRI paradigm examining the neural correlates of visual food cue pr...
Source: Journal of Abnormal Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
Previous studies of the relationship between maternal eating disorders and adverse perinatal outcomes have failed to control for familial transmission of perinatal phenotypes, which may confound the reported association. In a unique design afforded by the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and Medical Birth Registry of Norway, we linked three generations through birth register records and maternal-reported survey data to investigate whether maternal eating disorders increase risk after parsing out the contribution of familial transmission of perinatal phenotypes. The samples were 70,881 pregnancies in grandmother-moth...
Source: Journal of Abnormal Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
Although a growing body of research has examined Purging Disorder (PD), there remains a lack of conclusive evidence regarding the diagnostic validity of PD. This meta-analysis compared PD to DSM –5 eating disorders (i.e., Anorexia Nervosa [AN], Bulimia Nervosa [BN], and Binge Eating Disorder [BED]) and controls. A comprehensive literature search identified 38 eligible studies. Group differences on indicators of course of illness and both general and eating psychopathology were assessed us ing standardized effect sizes. Results supported the conceptualization of PD as a clinically significant eating disorder, but find...
Source: Journal of Abnormal Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
Nobody gains 30 pounds by eating one cookie alone–but re-exposure to wheat/grains in people who are grain-free can ignite relentless, insatiable appetite that drives 20, 25, or 30 pounds of weight gain over the next months, all from a single “indulgence” such as a cookie. Being grain-free on the Wheat Belly and/or Undoctored lifestyles frees you from this effect, giving you magnificent control over appetite and weight. About Undoctored: We are entering a new age in which the individual has astounding power over health–but don’t count on the doctor or healthcare system to tell you this. We dr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle appetite binge eating bulimia Dr. Davis gluten-free grain-free opiates opioids Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Abstract The role of craving in binge eating characteristic of bulimia nervosa (BN) is inconclusive. A network of regions associated with cue reactivity to food and substances has been identified, comprised of the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and striatum. The goal of this study was to examine individual differences in BOLD response in this appetitive network as moderators of the relationship between craving and binging in the natural environment in women with BN. Women with BN (N = 16) completed a baseline measure of craving and an fMRI scan, where they viewed neutral cues and food cues. Afte...
Source: Appetite - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Appetite Source Type: research
Dr. Sara Forman, director of Boston Children’s Hospital’s Outpatient Eating Disorders Program and Dr. Tracy Richmond, director of the PREP weight management program in Adolescent Medicine, share five things parents should know about eating disorders. Kids don’t have to be really thin to have an eating disorder. Not everyone with an eating disorder looks like he or she has an eating disorder. The condition is often hidden in secret habits or obsessions. For example, binge eating and bulimia — or binging and purging &mdash...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Mental Health Teen Health anorexia anorexia nervosa bulimia Dr. Sara Forman Dr. Tracy Richmond eating disorder Source Type: news
ConclusionsWhilst full spectrum eating disorders, including ARFID, were less common than OSFED or UFED, they were associated with poor mental HRQoL and significant functional impairment. The present study supports the movement of eating disorders in to broader socio demographic groups including men, socio-economic disadvantaged groups and those with obesity.
Source: Journal of Eating Disorders - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Source Type: research
PMID: 28707477 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Psychiatry Source Type: research
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