Psychology Around the Net: June 24, 2017

I conquered a fear last weekend, y’all. I went whitewater rafting for the first time. It wasn’t a phobia, but the days — and especially hours — leading up to it…well, I was terrified. What if I fall out of the raft? Crack my skull? Get sucked into one of those underwater cave things under some rocks? Fortunately, none of those things happened, and I’m chalking it up to two factors: One, I gave in and trusted my friends (and especially our guide), and two, I gave in and trusted myself. We couldn’t control the whitewater, but we could control ourselves, and we did. Fear and trust make for interesting bedfellows, don’t they? Let’s get to this week’s Psychology Around the Net! Get ready for the latest on enhancing creativity with music improvisation, the unlikelihood of changing your personality once you hit age 30, how horse therapy is helping PTSD patients, and more. New Approach to Teaching Music Improvisation Enhances Creativity: June 21 was World Music Day; perfect timing, considering Dr. Michele Biasutti’s (of the University of Padua in Italy) examination on how helping develop processes for music also can help enhance creativity. A Psychologist Who’s Studied Couples for Decades Says This Is the Best Way to Argue With Your Partner: Need to duke it out (figuratively, of course)? After 14 years of researching nearly 100 married couples (roughly 20 of which divorced along the way), Robert Levenson (Unive...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Creativity Health-related Marriage and Divorce Personality Psychology Psychology Around the Net PTSD Relationships Research Stress Columbia University Couples Deanna Kuhn Diet divorced Dr. Michele Biasutti Equine Assisted P Source Type: blogs

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AbstractPrevious research has demonstrated that sleep disturbances show little improvement with evidence ‐based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, sleep improvements are associated with PTSD treatment outcomes. The goal of the current study was to evaluate changes in self‐reported insomnia symptoms and the association between insomnia symptoms and treatment outcome dur ing a 3‐week intensive treatment program (ITP) for veterans with PTSD that integrated cognitive processing therapy (CPT), mindfulness, yoga, and other ancillary services. As part of standard clinical procedures, veterans (...
Source: Journal of Traumatic Stress - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Authors: Roberge EM, Bryan CJ Abstract Insomnia is the most commonly reported symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with at least 70% of patients with PTSD reporting disturbed sleep. Although posttraumatic insomnia has traditionally been conceptualized as a consequence of PTSD, it is the most likely symptom to not remit following otherwise successful PTSD treatment. This suggests that the relationship between PTSD and insomnia is more complex, such that they likely share underlying pathological mechanisms, and that factors non-specific to PTSD maintain chronic trauma-induced insomnia. Although several th...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
AbstractPrevious research has demonstrated that sleep disturbances show little improvement with evidence ‐based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, sleep improvements are associated with PTSD treatment outcomes. The goal of the current study was to evaluate changes in self‐reported insomnia symptoms and the association between insomnia symptoms and treatment outcome dur ing a 3‐week intensive treatment program (ITP) for veterans with PTSD that integrated cognitive processing therapy (CPT), mindfulness, yoga, and other ancillary services. As part of standard clinical procedures, veterans (...
Source: Journal of Traumatic Stress - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Having a baby is a wonderfully happy time, right? For many women, it certainly is, but estimates show that 1 in 5 women who give birth will suffer from some type of perinatal mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, OCD or psychosis. Chances are, this includes someone you know. In today’s podcast, Dr. Katayune Kaeni, a psychologist who specializes in perinatal mental health and a sufferer herself, discusses these often confusing and debilitating disorders, particularly postpartum psychosis, a more rare and severe form of perinatal mental illness. Who is at risk? What does perinatal psychosis look like? And what ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Disorders General Interview Parenting Podcast Pregnancy The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common, often debilitating mental health condition that occurs in some people who have experienced trauma. It can have a negative impact on mood, mimicking depression, and is characterized by petrifying episodes in which affected people re-experience trauma. New research suggests psychotherapy may provide a long-lasting reduction of distressing symptoms. Over the course of a lifetime, many people directly experience or witness trauma, such as sexual assault, violence, or natural disasters. Experts estimate that 10% to 20% of these people will experience acute (short-term) PTSD. So...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Mental Health Source Type: blogs
Could a chatbot, an online community, or a telepsychiatry solution offer meaningful help for people who are fighting mental health issues? Could virtual reality, artificial intelligence, or genetics appear as elements of assistance in the toolkit of medical professionals in the fields dealing with the human psyche? While we agree that medical fields requiring the most empathy and human touch will most probably not be swept away by new innovations, we looked thoroughly at how technology will appear in the future of psychiatry. Perhaps even help heal the cursed prince from Beauty and the Beast? The human touch is indispen...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Virtual Reality in Medicine AI apps AR artificial intelligence digital health digital health technologies health apps Innovation mental health psychiatry psychology technology VR Source Type: blogs
“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
ConclusionSpirituality underlies many of the experiences of MI, including changes in identity, meaning making, social supports, and MI symptoms. The findings of this mini-review highlight the need to consider a person’s spiritual fitness and health throughout military service and during treatment of MI and examine how spirituality can be fostered to help build resilience and reduce the risk of MI (17). While acknowledging the limited quality of evidence, encouraging military members and veterans to draw on S/R resources and practices may be a salve to psychospiritual distress. Integration of spirituality as a bona fi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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