A Runner ’s Comeback: From Multiple Fractures to a 50-Mile Race

Treatment TermsOrthopaedicsAnkle pain and ankle injurySports medicine CategoriesFamily health Author MaryAnn Fletcher Overview In April 2017, Harry Mendez Jr. crossed the finish line of a 50-mile race, exhausted but triumphant. The 35-year-old Durham resident had completed triathlons and endurance events before, but none had demanded the strength, commitment, and perseverance this one had. Just nine months earlier, he ’d been in Duke University Hospital, pins and rods holding his lower left leg together, wondering if he’d ever run again. Hero Imageharrymendez_blog.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks ContentIt started with when he set out for a bicycle ride. “I put my foot down to balance myself. My bike cleats--those shoes that clip into your bike pedals--got stuck in the pavement, and I fell over,” Mendez said. “When I went to get up, I couldn’t. I looked down, and my foot was just dangling.” Section Features Text Content Section Header Image/Videogym_1.jpg Section Features Images/Media Text Content Header A Surgical Solution ContentDr. Reilly was one of nine Duke orthopaedic surgeons--includingfoot-and-ankle andsports-medicine experts--who looked at Mendez ’s X-rays and CT scan and consulted on his case. The following week, when the swelling had subsided, Dr. Reilly performed surgery to repair his fractures. This included inserting a rod called an intramedullary nail down the center of his shinbone, then placing...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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We report a case of a pregnant woman who developed Horner's syndrome and paresthesia within the distribution of the trigeminal nerve following epidural analgesia for the relief of labor pain.ResumoA analgesia peridural é hoje em dia um procedimento comum para analgesia do trabalho de parto. Embora seja considerada uma técnica segura, não está isenta de complicações. A síndrome de Horner e a parestesia do território do nervo trigêmeo são complicações raras da analgesia peridural. Relatamos um caso de uma grávida que desenvolveu a s&iac...
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Publication date: Available online 15 August 2018Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Khaled F. Al-Massri, Lamiaa A. Ahmed, Hanan S. El-AbharAbstractAnticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin (PGB) and lacosamide (LCM), exhibit potent analgesic effects in diabetic neuropathy; however, their possible role/mechanisms in paclitaxel (PTX)-induced peripheral neuropathy have not been elucidated, which is the aim of the present study. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by injecting PTX (2 mg/kg, i. p) on days 0, 2, 4 and 6. Forty eight hours after the last dose of PTX, rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg/day of ei...
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Abstract Mobile phone use is known to be associated with musculoskeletal pain in the neck and upper extremities because of related physical risk factors, including awkward postures. A chair that provides adequate support (armrests and back support) may reduce biomechanical loading in the neck and shoulder regions. Therefore, we conducted a repeated-measures laboratory study with 20 participants (23 ± 1.9 years; 10 males) to determine whether armrests and back support during mobile phone use reduced head/neck flexion, gravitational moment, and muscle activity in the neck and shoulder regions. The results...
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