Pyramidal tract activation due to subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

ConclusionsDirect pyramidal tract activation can occur at stimulation thresholds that are within the range used in clinical routine. This spread of current compromises increase in stimulation strengths and is related to the development of side effects such as speech disturbances with chronic stimulation. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
Source: Movement Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

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Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is a valuable alternative to pharmacotherapy alone in an advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the growing number of patients with STN-DBS, its impact on the comorbidities should be considered.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of bilateral STN-DBS on the lipid profile in patients with PD.Methods: Three groups of parkinsonian patients were included: 20 treated pharmacologically–PHT group, 20 newly qualified for STN-DBS–DBS group, and 14 postoperative patients (median 30 months after surgery)–POP group. Plasma concent...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective therapy for reducing the motor symptoms of Parkinson ’s disease, but the mechanisms of action of DBS and neural correlates of symptoms remain unknown.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) is an effective treatment for cardinal motor symptoms and motor complications in Parkinson ’s Disease (PD). However, malpositioned DBS electrodes can result in suboptimal therapeutic response.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
One of the potential side-effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in individuals with Parkinson ’s disease is dyskinesia which cannot be relieved by reducing the dosage of levodopa [1]. Previous studies reported that stimulation in the area dorsal to STN arrests stimulation-induced dyskinesia [2,3] and can also reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia [4,5]. This region dorsal to STN contains a ri ch collection of ascending and descending fiber pathways including axons from cells in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) that project through the lenticular fasciculus and thalamic fasciculus en ...
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
This study investigated the influence of dispositional optimism on motor outcomes following STN-DBS in individuals with PD.
Source: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Short communication Source Type: research
Subthalamic (STN) and pallidal (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improve quality of life, motor, and nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few studies have compared their nonmotor effects.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionsDBS telemedicine could have a unique role to play in maintaining the delivery of DBS treatment and medical care to outpatients with movement disorders during the COVID ‐19 pandemic.
Source: Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research Source Type: research
Abstract Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) includes processes of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress which are related to dysregulation in the homeostasis of iron metabolism. Hepcidin is a peptide hormone responsible for systemic iron homeostasis and simultaneously the inflammatory response protein, induced in response to interleukin 6 (IL‑6). We assessed the serum concentration of hepcidin and IL‑6 in the groups of patients with PD treated only pharmacologically with optimal individualized therapy (MT) and treated additionally with deep brain stimulation (DBS), compared to the control group....
Source: Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars) Source Type: research
This article uses an optimal control approach to investigate the hypothesis that an increased delay in the central nervous system—unaccounted by delay compensation mechanisms—produces parkinsonian tremor. This hypothesis is motivated by the excessive inhibition projected from the basal ganglia to the thalamus in Parkinson’s disease. The thalamus relays signals from the cerebellum to the primary motor cortex: previous mapping of optimal control components indicates this prospective delay exists between the estimator (cerebellum) and controller (primary motor cortex). Simulations demonstrate realistic tremo...
Source: IEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, 160,000 patients worldwide who have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS) are now experiencing critical treatment disruptions. These include patients treated for Parkinson ’s disease, dystonia, epilepsy and essential tremor as well as for psychiatric disorders, like treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome. With many hospitals overburdened1 and the potential for community-based infection still high (and increasing), shifting to various forms of telemedicine DBS care has become part of a necessary “natural experiment” to mitigate risk for ...
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
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