Not Enough Evidence to Balance Harms, Benefit of Visual Skin Cancer Exam

There is currently not enough evidence to assess the balance of benefits and harms of a visual skin examination by a clinician to screen for skin cancer in asymptomatic adults.
Source: CancerNetwork - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Melanoma News Skin Cancer (Nonmelanoma) Source Type: news

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SKIN cancer symptoms are most commonly associated with moles on the skin. But this is only a sign of melanoma - non-melanoma skin cancer has a very different appearance. Are you at risk of either type?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The treatment of skin diseases based on topical delivery of siRNA, which act by inhibiting the expression of target transcripts, offers many potential therapeutic advantages for suppressing genes into the skin. PMID: 30084329 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
S, Suárez Conde I, Pereiro-Ferreirós M Abstract Actinic cheilitis is thought to be a premalignant lesion or a superficial squamous cell carcinoma. The prevalence of actinic cheilitis in Europe is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of actinic cheilitis in the Galicia region (north-west Spain). Secondary objectives were the description of risk factors of actinic cheilitis. A cross-sectional multicentre study in patients ≥ 45 years of age was performed in 8 dermatology departments in Galicia region during a 1-year period. The prevalence of actinic cheilitis was 31....
Source: Acta Dermato-Venereologica - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Acta Derm Venereol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to quality of cancer care criteria at the different hospitals evaluated varied. Our findings could be useful for identifying areas for improvement at different hospitals. Future studies should focus on measuring both process and outcome indicators. PMID: 30093072 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Actas Dermosifiliogr Source Type: research
Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the white population worldwide. It is divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common subtypes of NMSC and it is estimated that 2-3 million new cases occur globally each year. Malignant melanoma is the least common skin cancer; however, it is the most fatal one its incidence is alarmingly increasing. According to worldwide trends, skin cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in Colombia, by 2010 reached up to 20.2% of all cancer cases attended.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background and objectives: The incidence of cutaneous malignancy in the United States continues to rise. Mohs micrographic surgery is increasingly utilized to treat both nonmelanoma skin cancer (NSMC) and melanoma. This tissue-sparing method produces the highest cure rates while leading to an esthetic result. However, due to the need for intraoperative pathologic assessment, these procedures can be time-consuming and may average several hours. New technology aimed at more quickly assessing specimen margins for malignant cells has the potential to cut down on operative times and improve efficiency.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Previous retrospective studies have reported increased frequency of both malignant melanoma (MM, using population-based SEER data) and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) on the left side of the body. Population-based studies for basal and squamous cell carcinoma (BCC and SCC) have been very difficult as a database similar to SEER does not exist for NMSC, resulting in inferences from smaller retrospective cohorts to assess laterality. As Utah has one of the highest incidences of both MM and NMSC, we explored this question for both skin cancer types using a large database of all biopsies read by the University of Uta...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), specifically, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), has been increasing for decades. This increase is multifactorial: better skin cancer detection, increased sun exposure, and increased life expectancy. In addition, biopsy rates (number of biopsies/number of patient visits) are increasing in the U.S. Utah has one of the highest rates of both NMSCs and melanoma in the U.S. Historic figures for BCC:SCC ratio in the U.S.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Introduction: Actinic keratosis (AK) may be considered by some to be an incipient form of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as the rate of SCC in individuals with AK has been estimated at 0.025%-16%. There is much less reported evidence for AK association with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and melanoma (MM). The aim of this study is to determine if an association exists between AK and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC; SCC and BCC) and between AK and MM in a large midwestern U.S. patient population.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Background: Programmed death protein (PD) 1 inhibitors have revolutionized treatment for cancers such as melanoma. However, clinical benefits and risks of PD-1 inhibitors among nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are less well known, although off-label usage has been reported in the medical literature.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
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