Segmental transition of the first syllables of words in Japanese children who stutter: Comparison between word and sentence production.

Segmental transition of the first syllables of words in Japanese children who stutter: Comparison between word and sentence production. Clin Linguist Phon. 2016 Mar 30;:1-12 Authors: Matsumoto S, Ito T Abstract Matsumoto-Shimamori, Ito, Fukuda, &Fukuda (2011) proposed the hypothesis that in Japanese, the transition from the core vowels (i.e. syllable nucleus) of the first syllables of words to the following segments affected the occurrence of stuttering. Moreover, in this transition position, an inter-syllabic transition precipitated more stuttering than an intra-syllabic one (Shimamori &Ito, 2007, 2008). However, these studies have only used word production tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the same results could be obtained in sentence production tasks. Participants were 28 Japanese school-age children who stutter, ranging in age from 7;3 to 12;7. The frequency of stuttering on words with an inter-syllabic transition was significantly higher than on those having an intra-syllabic transition, not only in isolated words but in the first words of sentences. These results suggested that Matsumoto et al.'s hypothesis could be applicable to the results of sentence production tasks. PMID: 27030682 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics - Category: Speech Therapy Authors: Tags: Clin Linguist Phon Source Type: research

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Stuttering is a disorder that impacts the smooth flow of speech production and is associated with a deficit in sensorimotor integration. In a previous experiment, individuals who stutter were able to vocally compensate for pitch shifts in their auditory feedback, but they exhibited more variability in the timing of their corrective responses. In the current study, we focused on the neural correlates of the task using functional MRI. Participants produced a vowel sound in the scanner while hearing their own voice in real time through headphones. On some trials, the audio was shifted up or down in pitch, eliciting a correcti...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Abstract Myosin X (Myo10) has several unique design features including dimerization via an anti-parallel coiled coil and a long lever arm, which allow it to preferentially move on actin bundles. To understand the stepping behavior of single Myo10 on actin bundles, we labeled two heads of Myo10 dimers with different fluorophores. Unlike previously described for myosin V (Myo5) and VI (Myo6), which display alternating hand-over-hand stepping, Myo10 frequently took near simultaneous steps of both heads, and less frequently, 2-3 steps of one head before the other head stepped. We suggest that this behavior results fro...
Source: Biochemical and Biophysical Research communications - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem Biophys Res Commun Source Type: research
Conclusions This study provides empirical evidence that BI to the unfamiliar may have salience for childhood stuttering as it affected the quantity and quality of language spoken with an unfamiliar adult. Clinical implications of high BI for the assessment and treatment of preschool-age stuttering are discussed. PMID: 32073287 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Am J Speech Lang Pathol Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Fluency Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
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Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Which of the following 6 ECGs of patients with chest pain represent inferior OMI?The answer could be 1 or more than 1.1.2.3.4.https://hqmeded-ecg.blogspot.com/2011/10/inferior-st-elevation-what-is-diagnosis.html5.https://hqmeded-ecg.blogspot.com/2018/05/is-there-delayed-activation-wave.html6.https://hqmeded-ecg.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-40-year-old-male-with-several-chronic.htmlAnswer:3. and 5. are inferior OMI1., 2., 4., and 6. are limb lead early repolarizationIs it really possible to differentiate these?Yes.  Pendell did it easily getting 6/6 correct.I put this post up because I just received number 3 from a former gr...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Journal of Fluency Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Fluency Disorders - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Deficits in basal ganglia-based inhibitory and timing circuits along with sensorimotor internal modeling mechanisms are thought to underlie stuttering. However, much remains to be learned regarding the precise manner how these deficits contribute to disrupting both speech and cognitive functions in those who stutter. Herein, we examine the suitability of electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythms for addressing these deficits. We review some previous findings of mu rhythm activity differentiating stuttering from non-stuttering individuals and present some new preliminary findings capturing stuttering-related deficits in work...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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