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'Full stretch' NHS's stuttering winter preparations spark concerns
Pressure is mounting on NHS bosses to intervene ahead of winter, as official data suggests the system failed to make headway against key performance measures in the first quarter of 2017-18. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - August 10, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

5 Common Myths about Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Whether you’ve been to therapy or not, you’ve probably heard about cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). It’s a popular type of therapy that many, many therapists use to help their clients treat everything from severe anxiety to debilitating depression. But even though CBT is widespread, it’s still highly misunderstood—even by the professionals who practice it. Numerous myths still abound. Below, two psychologists who specialize in CBT share the facts behind the most common misconceptions. Myth: CBT is a rigid, one-size-fits-all approach where a clinician applies a specific technique to a specif...
Source: Psych Central - August 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Cbt CBT myths CBT psychologist Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Depression distorted thoughts Mood Disorders Negative Thoughts Source Type: news

Alcoholism drug baclofen 'is a stammer cure'
The treatment was discovered by chance after the man found he stopped stammering when he was given baclofen, a relaxant that eases stiff muscles caused by multiple sclerosis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

31 'Habits' Of People With Anxiety
Written by Sarah Schuster There are the quirky, small things that make you, you. Then, there are the things you do because of anxiety. While personality traits and anxious habits can blend together, to an outsider it’s not always clear which of these “habits” are driven by anxiety. Whether it makes you look “rude” (avoiding phone calls, canceling plans) or “odd” (leaving a social setting quickly, bouncing your leg) — it can be hard when others judge you based on these actions without knowing what’s going on inside your head. To find out some habits of people who have a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here's Why Some People Have More Anxious Thoughts Than Others
When my journalism career was just reaching cruising altitude, I was invited to appear on a local TV talk show. I despised public speaking but told myself this wasn’t a speech, it was a cozy chat. Unfortunately, that’s not how it felt at the studio. By the time I was seated under the bright lights on a dais that looked suspiciously like a stage, my brain was fogged with fear. When I did manage to utter a sentence, my voice quivered uncontrollably. For weeks, I woke up replaying those ten minutes, certain they had revealed who I truly was: a fraud. My choking problem dates back to high school, when I could smack...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do YOU struggle with a stammer?
The Starfish Project has offered an alternative approach to stammering, called 'coastal breathing'. This approach was pioneered by the Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our son ’s journey with CSWS epilepsy
Our son Joshua was born in 2010, a happy and healthy 9 pounds. At the age of 2, he was a loving and sweet little boy who loved books, trains, puzzles and playing with his older siblings and friends. He was highly intelligent, speaking in clear four-word sentences. He was curious about the world and loved to learn. At the age of four, Joshua began to decline in his social skills, becoming anxious, withdrawn and easily angered. He developed a stutter and had difficulty finding words to express himself. He often would not answer when spoken to and began exhibiting autism-like symptoms. Within a year, Joshua began ha...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Vinez Campbell Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories epilepsy epilepsy center Source Type: news

6-year-old girl has Batten disease which could kill her
Mila Makovek, 6, from Colorado, grew up a happy, healthy child. Then she started to stutter, walk differently and went blind. She was diagnosed with Batten disease - a rare disorder that could kill her. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study links stuttering to less blood flow in brain
HealthDay News Reduced blood flow in a part of the brain that's linked to speech may put people at risk for stuttering, a small study suggests. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Links Stuttering to Less Blood Flow in Brain
The more regions affected, the more severe the disorder, researchers suggestSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Stuttering (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Links Stuttering to Less Blood Flow in Brain
FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 -- Reduced blood flow in a part of the brain that's linked to speech may put people at risk for stuttering, a small study suggests. There are also signs that the lower the blood flow in regions of the brain tied to speech and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 6, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Stuttering 'is caused by restricted blood flow to the brain', study reveals
Researchers at the Children's Hospital Los Angeles  discovered that stutters have reduced blood flow in region in the frontal lobe of the brain linked to speech production. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stuttering linked to reduced blood flow in area of brain associated with language
A new study demonstrates that regional cerebral blood flow is reduced in the Broca's area -- the region in the frontal lobe of the brain linked to speech production -- in persons who stutter. More severe stuttering is associated with even greater reductions in blood flow to this region. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stuttering linked to reduced blood flow in area of brain associated with language
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) A study led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrates that regional cerebral blood flow is reduced in the Broca's area -- the region in the frontal lobe of the brain linked to speech production -- in persons who stutter. More severe stuttering is associated with even greater reductions in blood flow to this region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

John Glenn, First American to Orbit the Earth, Dies at 95
There weren’t a lot of silly pictures taken of John Glenn—mostly because Glenn just didn’t do silly. He did happy, of course. You don’t get the crinkles he had around his sea blue eyes simply because you’ve got the fair, thin skin of the redhead that he was. But if the happy was there, the silly wasn’t. Still, in 1959, when Glenn was announced as one of the original seven NASA astronauts, he knew that he’d have to abide a lot of regrettable silliness—usually at the hands of the space agency and media photographers, who would demand all manner of dreamed-up poses of the deeply...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Appreciation Astronaut john glenn Senator space Source Type: news

John Glenn Dead At 95: He Served His Country In War And In Space
John Glenn, an astronaut, senator and old-fashioned American hero, died Thursday at the age of 95. Glenn was the last survivor of the Mercury 7, selected in 1959 as NASA’s first group of astronauts. He became the first American to orbit the Earth on Feb. 20, 1962. It was a solo flight, not everything went as planned in space, and Glenn personified cool under pressure. Those nerves had earlier served him well as a much-decorated veteran of two wars and a military test pilot ― and perhaps they came in handy later in his 24 years in the U.S. Senate representing his native state of Ohio. He was born July 18, 1921, in C...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stuttering mysteries unfold in brain imaging study
Findings provide a road map to help develop treatments for stuttering, researcher says (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Discover More Clues to Stuttering
MRI shows involvement of brain areas controlling speech, attention and emotion (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain imaging reveals clues to stuttering
Maureen Salamon, HealthDay News A blend of brain circuits are altered in people who stutter, new research indicates. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Discover More Clues to Stuttering
MRI shows involvement of brain areas controlling speech, attention and emotion Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Stuttering (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Discover More Clues to Stuttering
MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 -- A blend of brain circuits are altered in people who stutter, new research indicates. Using an imaging technique that looks at brain cell metabolism, scientists learned that changes in areas involved in speech, attention and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 5, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Long-term consequences of childhood bullying in adults who stutter: social anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life - Blood GW, Blood IM.
PURPOSE: Psychosocial disorders have been reported in adults who stutter, especially social anxiety disorder. Social anxiety has been linked to childhood victimization. It is possible that recalled childhood victimization could be linked to psychosocial pr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Children ’s Hospital Los Angeles researchers report findings of MRS study of stuttering
Researchers at Children ’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) in the US have reported findings from its study examining brain regions of stuttering adults and children. (Source: Hospital Management)
Source: Hospital Management - November 25, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Research Reveals Stuttering Related to Brain Circuits That Control Speech Production
Researchers conduct first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - November 23, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Communication Information Source Type: news

Stuttering related to brain circuits that control speech production
Researchers have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stuttering related to brain circuits that control speech production
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

6 Expert-Approved Tips For Dating With Anxiety
When you suffer from an anxiety disorder, getting through a date can seem near impossible.  It may help to know you’re not alone. An estimated 18 percent of all American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder of some kind, ranging from social anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder and general anxiety. There’s a good chance you’ve gone on a date with someone who’s had a panic attack over the thought of dinner and a movie.  There are ways to cope with anxiety, though, and meet someone worthwhile. Below, experts on anxiety share their bes...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Testing Ecopipam's effectiveness in treating stuttering
Stuttering, an interruption in the flow of speech, affects about three million Americans. Currently, no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug treatments are available. In an attempt to find a new medicine, a research team will conduct a study to determine how effective ecopipam, an orally administered medication, is as treatment against stuttering. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I, Trigger
In August, the Dean of my alma mater, the University of Chicago, sent a letter to its freshmen nixing trigger warnings and such. The ban hit the headlines , provoking lively debate ("PC or not PC?") in comment-land. Lively, but unfocussed, because "trigger" is a looking-glass word. Besides, the issue goes much deeper. To nudge the conversation toward clarity, I offer my personal experience, not with triggers but as one. Imagine this. I'm talking with people I've never met before, say at a college reception. They're all articulate, accomplished: a sociologist, a biologist, a psychologist, and a histori...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

BioOne Announces New Partnerships, Titles for 2017
BioOne proudly announces content partnerships with Canadian Science Publishing, CSIRO Publishing of Australia, and the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, which together will enhance the full-text aggregation BioOne Complete with nine journals in 2017. With these sterling additions, BioOne Complete will now include 200 high impact titles from leading nonprofit scientific publishers around the world. Joining BioOne Complete in January 2017 will be: The Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, published by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature and available electronically for the first time thr...
Source: News from STM - September 1, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Democracy is far too important to be the preserve of the elite | Giles Fraser: Loose canon
The EU referendum has led some to claim big decisions should only be made by intellectuals and elites. But gut instincts should play a huge part in how we voteTowards the end of CS Lewis’s The Silver Chair there is a fascinating little exchange between a rather dour marsh-wiggle called Puddleglum and a brilliant sorceress that has imprisoned him and his friends below ground. Tightening her grip on their minds, the witch tries to convince Puddleglum that there is no such thing as above ground, that Narnia and Aslan are all fantasies, that his quest for something better is hopeless. The friends are close to being persu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 23, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Giles Fraser Tags: Anglicanism Christianity Religion London UK news World news Richard Dawkins Science CS Lewis Books Source Type: news

It's Finally Time to Stop Making Fun of People Who Stutter
As part of CBS's "Note to Self" series, Vice President Joe Biden released a letter to his 12 year old self, mentioning his debilitating stutter and the death of his son, Beau. The below section specifically focuses on stuttering and the bullies that he eventually stands up to, and he reads the note aloud in the video: You're only twelve. Your stutter is debilitating. It embarrasses you, and the bullies are vicious. But listen to Mom when she says, "bravery resides in every heart" -- and yours is fierce and clear. Listen to Dad when he says, "we get knocked down, and then we get right back ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just Because You Stutter Doesn't Mean You're Alone
It took a long time for me to come to terms with my stutter. Growing up, I didn't want to admit that sometimes I repeated a word or phrase or letter before getting it out. I didn't want to tell my friends and family and acquaintances that I stuttered. Even though millions of people around the world stutter, I felt alone. No one else seemed to talk like me and none of my favorite television shows had characters who sounded like me. Even though an estimated three million Americans stutter, it didn't seem like any of those people were around me. It took a while for me to learn that there were celebrities who stutter and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Tips To Keep In Mind When Talking To Someone Who Stutters
When someone pointed out Michael Turner's stutter as a teenager, it wouldn’t just ruin that single conversation. Sometimes, it would ruin his entire month.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lessons We Learned From American Idol and David Cook
A few weeks ago, we watched the finale of the 15th and final American Idol show. For many of us it was a nostalgic two hours filled with amazing contestants from all seasons. Rising from its humble beginnings, the show became one of the biggest hits on television and had a huge impact on pop culture. It gave us, the people, a chance to have a say in a musician's success and not leave it to industry executives. It gave many talented singers and musicians a chance to perform publicly and pursue a career they love. Watching that last nostalgic show, I thought about the many lessons learned from Idol over the years. I'm s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study with mice may lead to treatment for stuttering
Stephen FellerST. LOUIS, April 15 (UPI) -- Researchers think they've pinned the primary cause of stuttering down to a genetic mutation, which may eventually lead to a treatment for the condition. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stuttering mouse experiment sheds light on common human speech disorder
Genetic mutation given to squeaky rodents found halting patterns in early life squeaks, investigating causes of the human stammerThe closest thing to a stuttering mouse has been created by scientists who gave rodents a genetic mutation that causes the speech disorder in humans.Mouse pups recorded in the first week of life squeaked with more pauses and displayed more repetitive, halting patterns in the noises they produced when they carried the mutation. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Language Science Biology Source Type: news

Mice with genetic defect for human stuttering offer new insight into speech disorder
Mice that vocalize in a repetitive, halting pattern similar to human stuttering may provide insight into a condition that has perplexed scientists for centuries, according to a new study. These mice, which carry a mutation in a gene associated with stuttering in humans, may help scientists understand the biological basis of the disorder, and potentially lead to treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mouse noises from genetic stuttering experiment – audio
Recordings on mice from a genetic mutation help shed light on stammering in humansMice sounds recorded as part of scientific research Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Biology Language Animals Science Source Type: news

5 Ways to Enhance Relationships
Many of our problems come down to one singular issue - relationships. There are misunderstandings, miscommunication, and just generally taking others for granted. Even with the best of intentions, we sometimes fail to give our loved ones, friends, co-workers, and acquaintances the respect, affection, and understanding that they deserve. Think about it -- have you ever been shocked when a friend, family member, or partner shared that they felt unappreciated, unloved, or even disrespected? We've all probably experienced this to some degree, and we're left puzzled and ashamed that this person that we valued wasn't exactly fe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 Ways to Enhance Relationships
Many of our problems come down to one singular issue - relationships. There are misunderstandings, miscommunication, and just generally taking others for granted. Even with the best of intentions, we sometimes fail to give our loved ones, friends, co-workers, and acquaintances the respect, affection, and understanding that they deserve. Think about it -- have you ever been shocked when a friend, family member, or partner shared that they felt unappreciated, unloved, or even disrespected? We've all probably experienced this to some degree, and we're left puzzled and ashamed that this person that we valued wasn't exactly fee...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saying Goodbye to My Brother
Let's talk some truth, some difficult truth. Let's talk about something real, about life. This past year has been a challenging one for me. I lost my grandmother and my dog, Milou, last year, my dad this January and then my brother in August. What shocked me the most was losing my brother, he was only almost 41 and left behind two little children. The news kicked me in the gut and I couldn't breathe. I still remember when I got the phone call from my oldest brother and I knew immediately something was wrong because he was stammering, and he never stammers. When he said those words, everything in my body reacted, I felt li...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everything You Wanted To Know About Microdosing (But Were Afraid To Ask)
Long before microdosing was being touted as the Silicon Valley life hack du jour, Dr. James Fadiman was investigating the potential mind-enhancing effects of ingesting psychedelic drugs like LSD and psilocybin, more commonly known as magic mushrooms.   In the 1960s, Fadiman conducted pioneering psychedelic research, including one study in which he gave LSD and another hallucinogen, Mescaline, to scientists, mathematicians and architects to see how it affected creative problem-solving. (His research was one of the last investigations into LSD due to the Food and Drug Administration's mid-1960s research ban of...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 13, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' 2015 Quiz of the Year
In 2015, Behind the Headlines covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. Why not test your knowledge of 2015's health news with our month-by-month quiz?If you've been paying attention, you should find this quiz both easy and fun.Answers are at the bottom of the page – no peeking! QuestionsIn January 2015's health news...1. What activity was said to increase the risk of heart disease?a) playing violent video games b) sexual role playing c) angry tweeting 2. Eating like a what was claimed to reduce obesity risk?a) a Native American b) a Zulu c) a Viki...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

Ianto Roberts overcomes his stutter to ask his dream girl out on a date
Ianto Roberts, 19, from Mold, Wales, used to dread having to say his own name, but after meeting stunning Hannah Murray online, he made it his mission to overcome his stutter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ecstasy victim's plea to avoid party drug goes viral
Young Australian posts stuttering, body-shaking video as a warning for would-be users (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Is the Rate of Stuttering Recovery?
Discussion Stuttering is defined as to utter with involuntary repetition of sounds. This commonly occurs in young children especially of initial sounds (Li-li-li-like he can’t do that!) but it can be whole word repetition (Like-like-like he can’t do that!). Stuttering as a normal utterance markedly decreases by age 6, so by age 7 if the child has stuttering the child should be evaluated by a professional speech and language pathologist (SLP). Indications for referral to a SLP for stuttering and other problems can be found here. A recent review of stuttering epidemiology found: Initiation of stuttering occurs ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 23, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Mother with life-long stammer now spends all day of the phone - thanks to speech therapy
Yinka Dolan, 49, from Warrington, developed her stammer as a child after being scolded by her stepfather for talking too fast. She now runs a support group for other stammerers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Television's Nerdiest Indian Gets Real
During a recent segment on our very own HuffPost Live, a girl called in with seemingly nothing to say. She was blonde and looked to be in her teens, but it wasn't easy to tell since she was covering half her face with her hands, struggling to collect herself. Stammering through tears, she finally explained that she simply couldn't believe she was talking to Kunal Nayyar himself. On "The Big Bang Theory," 34-year-old Nayyar plays Rajesh Koothrappali, or Raj, a woman-fearing astrophysicist with a dry wit shared only with his nearest and dearest. In real life, he's a bonafide heartthrob, not to mention one of Hollyw...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers, clients turn to video to treat stuttering
Researchers investigate using self-modelling videos to help clients maintain fluency after treatment. For the study, participant videos were recorded post-treatment when their fluency skills--breathing techniques, how to start their voice, or move forward in speech--were at their peak. Participants were required to watch their videos at least twice a week. And the more they viewed, the better the results were, with a decrease in syllables stuttered and participants reporting their own perceptions that VSM helps in personal and professional situations. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 17, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news