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Figshare Partners With ASHA to Enhance Discoverability and Reuse of Their Research Outputs
Figshare, an online digital repository for academic research, today announced a new partnership with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) to showcase supplementary research outputs within the communication sciences and disorders discipline. As a professional society representing 191,500 members and affiliates who are audiologists, speech-language pathologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists, ASHA is committed to the publication of research, and has been for more than 80 years. Research outputs published across ASHA’s peer-reviewed scholarly journals will be aggregated under one portal...
Source: News from STM - June 23, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Understanding Aphasia After Brain Injury
June is National Aphasia Awareness Month, and I wanted to share some of what I have learned on my journey through aphasia after brain injury. According to Wikipedia, the term aphasia implies that one or more communication modalities in the brain have been damaged—and are therefore functioning incorrectly. The difficulties for people with aphasia can range from occasional trouble finding words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write; their intelligence, however, is unaffected. Since no two brain injuries are ever the same, the way aphasia affects one person can vary greatly from the next person. In my own expe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Confronting Autism Early Is The Key To Effective Therapy
This study, which we called “Grandma Knows Best,” showed that frequent interaction with a grandparent, primarily the grandmother—who isn’t as reluctant to share her concerns—dramatically accelerated the age of diagnoses, by four to five months. This is very significant; an “earlier” autism diagnosis normally refers to a few weeks rather than several months. These results suggest that close family and friends should feel comfortable saying something—and parents should be receptive to hearing it—because doing so may lead to earlier detection and treatment. Help Yourself,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clear spoken language model promotes language learning in children with cochlear implants
(University of Helsinki) According to recent doctoral study from University of Helsinki, slow, prosodically emphasized and stressed spoken language help children with cochlear implants in language learning. Also the involvement of parents in speech therapy is important. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Living with Rett syndrome, living with hope
For the first year of her life, Ava Gryniewicz seemed to be developing like any other happy baby. She had learned a few words, including “mama” and “dada,” and was picking up Cheerios with pincer fingers. But by the time she was 14 months old, everything had changed. Ava started to lose these skills and wasn’t reaching other milestones. At the recommendation of her daycare center, she started early intervention. “She wasn’t keeping up and her daycare providers were concerned that standard daycare might be too much for her,” says her mom, Joanne. That’s when Joanne and h...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 1, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Alycia Berg Augmentative communication Dr. Jonathan Picker rett syndrome Rett Syndrome Program Suzanne Rose Source Type: news

Communication Not at Root of Tantrums in Autism
Study shows outbursts occur just as frequently among children without speech, language troubles (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Communication Problems Not At Root of Tantrums in Kids with Autism
Study shows outbursts occur just as frequently among children without speech, language troubles Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Autism Spectrum Disorder (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Health Insurance A Right Or A Privilege?
Now more than ever, health insurance is a staple story in the 24-hour news cycle. Opinions vary widely on the issue, as do politician’s thoughts on the matter. Debates rage, tensions grow, and deeper divides are formed as our government wrestles with this colossal dispute. Nestled at the heart of it all though is a basic question: Is health insurance a right or a privilege in the United States? I’m alive today because my school district, where I’ve now taught for 20 years, offers the ‘Cadillac of insurance plans.’ On April 26, 2006, I checked into the hospital for a scheduled C-section. Due to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Learning to Talk Like a Woman (or Man)
A growing number of speech language therapists cater to transgender clients seeking to retrain their voices. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS Tags: Transgender and Transsexuals New York University Voice and Speech Women and Girls Testosterone Language and Languages Source Type: news

Thousands Face Lead Hazards as Trump Eyes Budget Cuts Thousands Face Lead Hazards as Trump Eyes Budget Cuts
Laicie Manzella lived in a rundown house on Buffalo ’ s east side when three of her children tested with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood. Her oldest son suffered nosebleeds, body rashes and a developmental disorder requiring speech therapy.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Hundreds More Lead Hotpsots Are Identified As Trump Prepares To Gut Programs
BUFFALO, New York (Reuters) - Laicie Manzella lived in a rundown house on Buffalo’s east side when three of her children tested with dangerously high levels of lead in their blood. Her oldest son suffered nosebleeds, body rashes and a developmental disorder requiring speech therapy. Checking her apartment, county health inspectors found 15 lead violations, all linked to old paint in this blue collar city plagued by lead poisoning. A Reuters investigation found at least four city zip codes here where 40 percent of children tested from 2006 to 2014 had high lead levels, making Buffalo among the most dangerous lead hots...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Focus on: Autism spectrum disorder
April is Autism Awareness Month and there is a lot in the news about autism. More and more children — up to one out of 68 — are diagnosed with autism. Sesame Street even has a new character, Julia, who has autism. But what exactly is this condition, how does it affect children and what can you do to help? What is autism? Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex disorder of very early brain development that is approximately four times more common in boys than girls. Autism spectrum disorder was previously recognized as several separate disorders — including autistic disorder, pervasive develop...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 6, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Carolyn Bridgemohan and Sarah Spence Tags: Diseases & Conditions Parenting autism Autism Spectrum Center autism spectrum disorder Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan Dr. Sarah Spence Source Type: news

​$20M Adventist Care Center's nursing facility to create 150 jobs (Video)
The new Adventist Care Center's nursing facility in Kissimmee will create 150 new jobs once it opens in April 2018. “Those jobs will include licensed nurses, speech therapists, certified nursing assistants and other various occupations,” said Michelle Givens, CEO of Adventist Care Centers, during the groundbreaking ceremony on March 30 for Adventist Health System, Adventist Care Centers and Florida Hospital ’s new skilled nursing facility. Givens said the center will hire for the positions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

​$20M Adventist Care Center's nursing facility to create 150 jobs (Video)
The new Adventist Care Center's nursing facility in Kissimmee will create 150 new jobs once it opens in April 2018. “Those jobs will include licensed nurses, speech therapists, certified nursing assistants and other various occupations,” said Michelle Givens, CEO of Adventist Care Centers, during the groundbreaking ceremony on March 30 for Adventist Health System, Adventist Care Centers and Florida Hospital ’s new skilled nursing facility. Givens said the center will hire for the positions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 30, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

Intensive Speech Therapy Helps Months After Stroke Intensive Speech Therapy Helps Months After Stroke
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Intensive speech therapy helps months after stroke
(Reuters Health) - Even months after a stroke, survivors can make major strides in communication and quality of life with intensive speech therapy, a recent study in Germany suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Hearing Loss Predicted to Grow Tremendously by 2060 in U.S.
Untitled by Joel Mwakasege is licensed under CC0. According to a recent study by Johns Hopkins Medicine, hearing loss among the U.S. population could jump from 44 million in 2020 to 73.5 million by 2060; the 2060 number would comprise 23 percent of the adult American population, compared to 15 percent in 2020. And in 2060, 55 percent of adults with hearing loss will be over 70. This sort of growth for this health condition is unprecedented, according to Neil DiSarno, chief staff officer of audiology at American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The most common cause of hearing loss is exposure to loud noise. To prevent...
Source: Network News - March 7, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NN/LM South Central Region Tags: Consumer Health Disabilities General (all entries) Research Source Type: news

Unprecedented study of hearing aid outcomes in older adults released today
(American Speech-Language-Hearing Association) The first-ever placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial of hearing aid outcomes published today in the American Journal of Audiology shows that older adults benefit from hearing aid use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Do YOU struggle with a stammer?
The Starfish Project has offered an alternative approach to stammering, called 'coastal breathing'. This approach was pioneered by the Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How These Tennis Ball Chairs Are Helping Kids With Sensory Issues
Students with sensory concerns are finding help from an unlikely source: tennis balls. Amy Maplethorpe, a speech language pathologist at Raymond Ellis Elementary School in Round Lake, Illinois, used hot glue to attach tennis ball halves on the back and seat of chairs in the school’s sensory room. She told The Huffington Post the chairs are helpful for many kids who have difficulty regulating sensory input within their body and in their environments. Some of the students’ diagnoses include autism, Down syndrome and components of sensory processing disorder. Maplethorpe explained to HuffPost that the tennis ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why These Preemie Parents Are Sharing Their NICU Photos
On Sep. 23, 2015, Jourdan and Matt Moore welcomed their twin son and daughter, Jaxson and Cadence. The babies were born four months early and went on to spend over three months in the NICU. The experience was difficult for the Moores to say the least, but now the twins are healthy and thriving at home. Jourdan and Matt are sharing photos from the NICU, along with images of their progress, to offer a message of hope to other parents in that difficult situation. On this day... One year ago October 16th Jaxson fit inside his daddy's hand. He was 23 days old and weighed 1lb 8oz. Exactly one week prior he had a breat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why These Preemie Parents Are Sharing Their NICU Photos
On Sep. 23, 2015, Jourdan and Matt Moore welcomed their twin son and daughter, Jaxson and Cadence. The babies were born four months early and went on to spend over three months in the NICU. The experience was difficult for the Moores to say the least, but now the twins are healthy and thriving at home. Jourdan and Matt are sharing photos from the NICU, along with images of their progress, to offer a message of hope to other parents in that difficult situation. On this day... One year ago October 16th Jaxson fit inside his daddy's hand. He was 23 days old and weighed 1lb 8oz. Exactly one week prior he had a breat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How I solve speech problems for a living
The mid-80s was a pivotal time for Lynda Katz Wilner. She was a then new-to-Baltimore clinical speech and language pathologist working in a hospital setting. And when the opportunity arose, Wilner jumped on at the chance to explore a new market in her field, accent modification. “That was a sweet spot for me because I’m a transplanted New Yorker ,” she said. “I know what it’s like to be noticed because of the way you’re speaking and not necessarily because of what you’re saying.” She… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 29, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Rebecca Logan Source Type: news

Factors associated with speech-language disorders in motorcycle accident victims - Silva MG, Silva VL, Vilela MR, Gomes AO, Falc ão IV, Cabral AK, Lima ML.
PURPOSE: To investigate factors associated with speech-language disorders in victims of motorcycle accidents. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. Victims of motorcycle accidents studied were treated at Hospital da Restaura METHODS: ção betw... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Stronger together: Families of girls with SPG47 find support in each other
Imagine your child is diagnosed with a rare neurological condition. So rare that there are only a handful of reported cases, and those are from halfway around the world. This was the case for Chris and Kasey Edwards of Massachusetts and Kevin and Angela Duffy of Pennsylvania. Their daughters’, Robbie and Molly, are among only 11 children in the world to be diagnosed with an extremely rare genetic disorder, called spastic parapalegia-47 (SPG47). “When they told us how rare this was, our minds were going in a thousand directions,” says Kasey, Robbie’s mom. “We didn’t know what to think.&rd...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Department of Neurology Dr. Basil Darras hereditary spastic parapalegia HSP type 47 living with rare disease SPG47 Source Type: news

Aging Care Is A Big Business -- That Fails The Patient
I was thrust into the role of being a family caregiver for my husband about six months ago and if there is one thing I’ve learned, it’s this: Aging is a big money-maker for a lot of people. No, not for family caregivers like me who don’t get paid a nickel, but for pretty much everyone else who comes in contact with an older patient. I can almost hear the ka-ching of their cash registers as they offer to “help.” The goal of the health-care industry is to keep people alive for as long as they can. And if you ask me, there is only one reason for this keep-’em-breathing approach: Y...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Elijah laughs: Augmentative communication device helps boy with cerebral palsy
A computer voice utters a simple statement. Sometimes, it’s “My name is Elijah.” Other times, “My parents are Brian and Leah,” or “I feel happy.” For the first time in his life, Elijah can tell his mother, ‘Yes, I want a hug.’ Another phrase — “I love the Patriots” — is often repeated. And a brown-eyed, curly-haired kindergartener’s eyes light up. He smiles and laughs out loud. It’s a whole new world for 5-year-old Elijah Gauthier, says his mom, Leah. Leah and her husband Brian have taken Elijah, who has severe cerebral palsy and is n...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Augmentative communication Boston Children's at Waltham cerebral palsy Source Type: news

Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly
(Reuters) – Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a “locked-in” patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks. “We’ve built a system that’s reliable and autonomous that works at home ...
Source: Mass Device - November 14, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Neurological Source Type: news

Juli Stec Named COO of Mercy Hospital (Movers & Shakers)
Juli Stec has been appointed to chief operating officer at Mercy Hospital in Fort Smith. In her new position, she will oversee cardiology services, working with Mercy Clinic Chief Operating Officer Amy Fore. Stec will also oversee oncology services, lab services, environmental services, facilities, security, food and nutrition, wound care, rehabilitation services, home-based services, the sleep disorder center and the Regional Critical Access Facilities in Ozark, Paris, Booneville and Waldron. Stec has more than 30 years of health care experience. Most recently, she served eight years as the chief executive officer of Heal...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - November 7, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

The many adventures of Wesley: Specialty care helps toddler with heart disease reach neurodevelopmental milestones
Will and Alicia Ethridge knew their unborn son would need complex open-heart surgery soon after birth, due to a serious congenital defect that was detected in utero. Wesley suffered from a genetic form of cardiomyopathy, which meant the walls of his heart muscles were thickened, and blood flow to the left side of his body was restricted. The knowledge about their son’s disease prepared them for many things about the impending medical journey (including arranging for cardiac surgery at the Boston Children’s Hospital Heart Center, just a few hours’ drive from their home in Maine) but there were many mo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Erin Horan Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program Dr. Caitlin Rollins Dr. Samantha Butler Heart Center Source Type: news

Staff Time Spent on Bureaucracy Robs Stroke Patients of Therapy Staff Time Spent on Bureaucracy Robs Stroke Patients of Therapy
Staff and organizational factors, rather than patient factors, are the main barriers to more intensive physical, occupational, and speech therapy during the acute phase of stroke recovery, a study shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - November 1, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Referral patterns as a contextual variable in pediatric brain injury: a retrospective analysis - Ciccia AH, Lundine JP, Coreno A.
In this study, we examined patterns of SLP referral and factors affecting referral during the acute period following brain i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The Heart of Mental Health and Well-Being at the United Nations
In the normally staid halls of the U.N., energy exploded as Bolivian musician Hillario Soto entered a large conference room at the back, playing his home-made bass flute, followed Pied-Piper-style by a troupe of musicians, adult vocalists, and youth singers. Leading the revelry on keyboards was internationally-acclaimed composer and singer/songwriter Russell Daisey performing his original anthem "Happy People, Happy Planet" that celebrates a joyful connection between people and the environment. Bass flute player Hillario Soto leading the troupe in the event open. Photo: Mamadou Dabo. As they paraded down th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Free Webinar: A Beginners Guide to Creating Accessible Documents
Are you interested in learning how to make your documents accessible to people with disabilities? The Institute on Disability is offering this free webinar tomorrow at 12:30 Pacific Time. From their website: “Description: During this webinar, participants will learn the steps for creating an accessible document and the importance of having content accessible. Areas to be explored include the use of alternative tags, styles, headings, and hyperlink texts. Pitfalls for creating accessible materials will be explored and elements to be avoided will also be analyzed. By the end of the session participants will have the kn...
Source: Dragonfly - September 19, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Maddie Romansic Tags: Training & Education Source Type: news

Victims seeking help from speech-language pathologists: bullying, preparedness, and perceptions - Blood GW, Blood IM.
This study examined if victims seeking assistance for bullying contacted speech-language pat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Sign language may be helpful for children with rare speech disorder
Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Speech therapy for children with dysarthia acquired before three years of age
Children with motor impairments often have the motor speech disorder dysarthria, a condition which effects the tone, strength and co-ordination of any or all of the muscles used for speech. Resulting speech difficulties can range from mild, with slightly slurred articulation and breathy voice, to profound, with an inability to produce any recognisable words. Children with dysarthria are often prescribed communication aids to supplement their natural forms of communication. However, there is variation in practice regarding the provision of therapy focusing on voice and speech production. Descriptive studies have suggested t...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In Klinefelter Syndrome Patients, What are the Common Behavioral Problems?
Discussion Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a common genetic abnormaly with a prevalence of 1 in ~650 male births. It was first described in 1942 by Dr. Harry Klinefelter. It is associated with at least one extra X chromosome with the most common karyotype (~80% of patients) being 47 XXY. Other karyotypes are seen along with mosaicism. It is believed that although it is very prevalent, only about 25-33% of people with KS are identified. About 10% are identified before puberty with the rest usually identified because of hypogonadism and tall stature especially in teenage years or due to infertility in adulthood. KS is diagnosed...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 29, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

From silence to songs and silliness: R óisín’s cochlear implant journey
When her daughter Róisín started preschool, Margaret Morgan sat in her car, parked just outside of the school building. “I was waiting for someone to call and say, ‘She needs you. She needs you.’” The call never came. Róisín, now 4, is a social butterfly who loves everything about preschool — from belting out her favorite songs to dancing with her friends. It isn’t the outcome Margaret imagined when she learned of Róisín’s severe-to-profound hearing loss at age 1.We were terrified, but after months of seeking answers to no avail, we finally...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 9, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Boston Children’s Cochlear Implant Program Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement Dr. Greg Licameli Source Type: news

Deep brain stimulation surgery while asleep brings relief from dystonia
Treatment TermsParkinson's and other movement disorders CategoriesTreatments/research advancementsWomen's healthMen's health Additional SEO Keywords deep brain stimulation, dbs surgery, dbs, brain stimulation, dystonia, SEO Meta Description Thomas Galvin suffered dystonia symptoms for decades —until technology at Duke allowed him to have deep brain stimulation surgery while asleep Overview Raleigh resident Thomas Galvin suffered involuntary muscle contractions for decades —until technology at Duke allowed him to have surgery while asleep to quell the repetitive movements. Hero Imagetom_ga...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Helping Transgender People Find Their Voice
Speech therapist Wendy Chase helps transgender people make their voices sound like their gender identity. She says how people communicate affects how they are perceived. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Family and community predictors of comorbid language, socioemotional and behavior problems at school entry - Hughes N, Sciberras E, Goldfeld S.
OBJECTIVES: To identify the prevalence and family and community-level predictors of comorbid speech-language difficulties and socioemotional and behavioral (SEB) difficulties across a population of children at school entry. METHODS: The School Entr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Best Plan For Autism Starts With Behavioral Therapy
Although there is no cure for autism, various interventions can help diminish the symptoms, sometimes profoundly. Since both social and communication differences are part of the diagnosis, behavioral and speech language therapy are typically the foundation of intervention. But one challenge in planning, and a stress for parents, is that no single educational plan works for all children. From a research point of view, the most proven approach for children with autism remains behavioral therapy. While behavioral intervention sometimes seems meant only for overly rambunctious children who act out, that's not the case. It's ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Speech-language pathology in acute pediatric chemical or button battery ingestion injury - Follent AM, Rumbach AF, Ward EC, Dodrill P, Lewindon P.
We describe patterns of early PO intake, and referral to speech-langu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Observations From Below: Transitioning Into College
One of the first things I learned graduating high school and going to college, was that college requires a lot more responsibilities and work. In high school, you may have had a whole support group behind you, such as physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, etc. In college, you're on your own to find the help you need, even if you don't know what that need is yet. The following are a few tips to assist in your quest for higher education. Start early. I started visiting colleges during my sophomore year of high school. Make sure to get an appointment with the disability services (this term goes b...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Speech-language pathologists can help kids who struggle to read
(University of the Pacific) Classroom teachers may not employ the strategies that can help students master complex written language, according to speech-language pathology researchers at University of the Pacific. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stroke victims abandoned after they leave hospital as experts attack aftercare
A report, based on interviews with 1,200 stroke patients in England, reveals that many are left without the physiotherapy, speech therapy and rehabilitation they need to rebuild their lives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hear me roar: A mother hunts down answers for her son
If it’s true that raising boys is not for the fainthearted, then Nicole Laws is truly lionhearted. A nurturer and a protector, beautiful and strong, this mother of four boys will hunt down the best solution to a problem … no matter what stands in her way. Mason was born on Jan. 28, 2011, in Syracuse, New York. A month premature, he struggled with eating and breathing, but Nicole wasn’t overly worried. “This was our fourth child. The first three had reflux, so I was thinking, ‘This will be a piece of cake!’” Mason was observed for a few days at the local hospital and sent home. Unf...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 10, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. John Lee Dr. Rachel Rosen Dr. Reza Rahbar Dr. Umakanth Khatwa laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Management of persistent cognitive symptoms after sport-related concussion - Sohlberg MM, Ledbetter AK.
PURPOSE: This case review examines treatments speech-language pathologists at our clinic delivered to middle school, high school, and college students for the management of persistent cognitive symptoms after sport-related concussion. The goal is to examin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Playing Ping Pong with Disability
Table tennis players train at Majd Sports. Majd Sports is a recreational centre catering for people with disabilities in Ramallah, occupied West Bank. Credit: Silvia Boarini/IPSBy Silvia BoariniRAMALLAH, Occupied West Bank, Apr 28 2016 (IPS)Despite formally adopting progressive laws, such as Law Number 4, and ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disability, Palestinian authorities still struggle to get beyond rhetoric when it comes to supporting the 7 to 11 per cent of the population that is affected by disability. As the ongoing Israeli military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza continues to block t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Silvia Boarini Tags: Active Citizens Armed Conflicts Civil Society Featured Global Geopolitics Headlines Health Human Rights Middle East & North Africa Population Source Type: news